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Old 28-03-2010, 18:09   #1
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Stuck Shift Lever

Went sailing this weekend , put the sails up and shut down the motor. Felt the max prop freewheeling so shifted to reverse to rotate the prop to prevent the freewheeling, The shift lever stuck in the reverse position, not wanting to shift. We have a yanmar 4hte turbo motor with a kanzaki transmission. I removed the control cable from the lever on the transmission and the cable seemed to function fine. I was able to shift the transmission by hand, then when hooked back up to the control cable the shifter seemed to work. Now after shifting 50 plus times no locking up. Maybe wants to hang up alittle when shifting, giving some resistance between gears. I am not sure if this resistance is normal. Not excited about locking in reverse when I might be docking. Any suggestions on cause or whaT I SHOULD DO? Thanks
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Old 28-03-2010, 19:18   #2
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How old ithe cable and when was the last time it was lubricated? Maybe worth while doing the latter and considering replacing the cable & keep the other as a spare. The GOOD news is that the gear lever at the engine works. Maybe something jammed where the cable attached to the lever and you fixed it when you reattached the cable after moving the transmisiion lever. Is it a sail drive? If it is check that the seals on the SD have not allowed water ingress. That will cause the gears to jam if there is water in the SD oil.
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Old 29-03-2010, 06:25   #3
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The cable is 10 years old,but the motor only has 50 hours on it. I recently bought the boat when it only had 16 hours on the motor. It is a standard straight shaft installation. Thanks for the reply.
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Old 29-03-2010, 06:28   #4
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Don't lube the (co-axial) cable.

The following advice is exerpted from the Teleflex/Morse FAQs:
Teleflex Marine - // Teleflex Marine, A World Leader in Marine Products.

See also ➥ Teleflex Marine - // Teleflex Marine, A World Leader in Marine Products.

There are three possible trouble areas: the control, the cable, and the throttle or transmission connection. By isolating these one at a time, you will find the problem. Engine(s) must be OFF when performing these checks:

a. Disconnect the cable at the throttle or transmission attachment point. Move the throttle or transmission arm through its arc to be certain there is no restriction or binding. If the arm is stiff or binding, clean and lubricate moving parts. If this does not solve the problem, make the appropriate repairs. Generally, the force required to move a throttle or shift arm should be no more than 5-10 pounds.

b. With the cable disconnected at the engine end, try to move the control lever. If it moves freely, the problem was the throttle/transmission arm. If the control handle is still hard to operate, disconnect the cable from the control. If the lever operates smoothly, the control cable needs replacement. If the lever is still hard to move, lubricate the lever pivot point in the control with penetrating oil and a light grease.

c. If the problem is with a throttle lever, you may have a cable brake installed to limit cable feedback to the handle. If this is the case, loosen or remove the brake. If throttle lever creep back is a problem on the boat, you should consider installing a Teleflex CH5600 SLT control. This unit will stop cable creep without sacrificing a smooth feel.


***

Installation Tips for Teleflex/Morse Engine Controls and Cables

Control cable routing paths should be chosen to minimize bends, kinks and obstructions. Cable routing with a few casual bends will result in better feel at the control than one with many sharp bends.

1. Avoid tight or sharp bends in the cable routing.
2. Take care not to kink the jacket (casing) or core wire.
3. Handle cable with care during installation/maintenance.
4. Keep cable away from excessive heat and moisture.(Do not route near exhaust manifolds or in a bilge, for example)
5. Don't lubricate core wire (moving wire inside the casing)
6. Make sure cable moves freely before connecting to control and engine. Keep cable ends dirt and corrosion free.
7. Lubricate pivot points and sliding parts of the cable with a good quality water-resistant grease.

When connecting the throttle control cable to the engine and control head, ensure that cable travel and feel are properly adjusted:

1. Adjust cable position so that throttle lever movement allows the full throttle range, from idle to full speed. This can be done at the engine end of OEM type cables and at either end of "universal" type cables.
2. Adjust lever stops in control (if so equipped) to limit lever movement to slightly less than cable travel. This adjustment will help prevent cable damage if the lever is moved beyond the cable's range of travel.
3. Adjust cable or lever brake (if so equipped) so that lever is easy to move, but does not creep due to vibration.
4. In twin station applications, do not engage cable or lever brake at upper station control. This will create additional drag and make the control difficult to operate.
5. In all cases, ensure that the cable end is aligned properly with the control lever arm (control end) and throttle arm (engine end). A control cable must swivel somewhat throughout its range of movement; ensure that the cable anchor points can swivel freely throughout its range of movement.

When connecting the shift control cable to the engine and control head, ensure that cable travel and feel are properly adjusted:

1. Adjust cable position so that shift lever movement allows the full shift range, from neutral to forward and reverse, with full engagement of forward and neutral. Ensure that control detents (if so equipped) are synchronized with transmission detents, so that lever action matches the appropriate shift arm movement at the transmission. This can be done at the engine end or OEM type cables and a either end of the "universal" type cables.
2. Adjust lever stops in control (if so equipped) to limit lever movement to slightly less than cable travel. This adjustment will help prevent cable damage if the lever is moved beyond the cable's range of travel.
3. Don't use a cable brake or lever brake on the shift cable. The cable must have some free movement to allow the transmission's shift detents to "center" themselves.
4. In twin station applications, do not engage the control's detents at upper station control. This will make it difficult to properly engage forward, neutral and reverse.
5. In all cases, ensure that the cable and is aligned properly with the control lever arm (control end) and shift arm (engine end). A control cable must swivel somewhat throughout its range of movement; ensure that the cable anchor points can swivel freely throughout its range of movement.
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Old 29-03-2010, 06:39   #5
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Were you still sailing at a good speed when the shifter was stuck? If so, it is possible that the blades didn't rotate all the way and you just had a lot of pressure on the reverse gear and the clutch didn't want to move easily. The pressure probably eased by the time you got around to trouble shooting it.

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Old 29-03-2010, 07:15   #6
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Probably only sailing at 4 knots. I can,t remember if I tried shifting again after stopping before I disconnected the cable from transmission lever.
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