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Old 16-12-2008, 18:17   #1
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Reliability of new spare parts

Over the last year or so, I have discovered a disturbing pattern which I think is significant to the cruiser.

The issue is that many people including myself will stock new parts, particularly engine parts in anticipation of a cruise or reduced availability of parts in the future.

Since taking this approach in the last year, I have received defective parts from the dealer / manufacturer including.

1 new fuel lift pump, irrepairably misassembled (in and out ports backwards)
1 new fuel lift pump, leaking, irrepairably misassembled
1 new oil pressure and warning switch sender non-functional
1 new coolant pump leaking from the bearing though the weep hole

My point is that if you are somewhere or even at your home port and your new spare is defective, you could be pretty much in the same place as had you not had a replacement part. You could be in an even worse position as you now have to fight to get a replacement part. Don't even try to get you money back. A further complication is that by the time you need to use the new part, it may not even be in warranty anymore.

Maybe if you're really lucky you could canabalize both of them to get one functioning part. If not, you've just doubled or even trippled your down time.

Short of removing an existing working component and then installing the new component to test it, I'd like to know if anyone has come up with some other way to address this situation.
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Old 16-12-2008, 18:22   #2
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Short of removing an existing working component and then installing the new component to test it, I'd like to know if anyone has come up with some other way to address this situation.
I think you have the answer here, except that instead of installing the new component to just test it, make it the in-use component and take out the old one for your spare. That way you know the part fits. It is less likely to break because it is new and you know you have a backup if it does break.

Do you have a green machine

Paul L
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Old 16-12-2008, 18:59   #3
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I do not know what company manufactured the parts but I see this in every aspect of my working life. People/companies no longer seem to care about quality. It seems to always be the bottom line in profitability even at the cost reputation. The inconvenience and in some cases danger to life is no longer a concern.
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Old 16-12-2008, 19:34   #4
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Boy does this sound like a Perkins Prima
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Old 16-12-2008, 19:41   #5
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This goes way beyond engine parts. I have had water pumps, many electronics, and a plethora of other equipment NOT work right out of the box.
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Old 17-12-2008, 07:30   #6
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I wonder if this is not a consequence of off-shore manufacturing. A fellow I know in SoCal sent a piece of gear off to China a few years ago to get quotes for having the piece manufactured there. At the time he bragged that the quoted price was less than half of what it was costing him to build the piece in south LA. The long and the short of the story is, however, that the failure rate and need for exchanges was so great that, ultimately, he abandoned the effort, but not before he had done serious damage to his company's reputation and business.

For our part, when we buy spares we fit them immediately and vacuum pack the original parts as spares (the Large Food-Saver has a world of uses).

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
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Old 17-12-2008, 07:40   #7
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I wonder if this is not a consequence of off-shore manufacturing. A fellow I know in SoCal sent a piece of gear off to China a few years ago to get quotes for having the piece manufactured there. At the time he bragged that the quoted price was less than half of what it was costing him to build the piece in south LA. The long and the short of the story is, however, that the failure rate and need for exchanges was so great that, ultimately, he abandoned the effort, but not before he had done serious damage to his company's reputation and business.

For our part, when we buy spares we fit them immediately and vacuum pack the original parts as spares (the Large Food-Saver has a world of uses).

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
I am not find this to be the case, as a matter of fact it seems that the products labeled made in the USA have the same or maybe even higher failure rates than those made overseas. It usually comes down to design flaws, poor quality components, and a general lack of quality control at the factory regardless of what country it is put together in.
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Old 17-12-2008, 07:44   #8
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Originally Posted by Paul L View Post
I think you have the answer here, except that instead of installing the new component to just test it, make it the in-use component and take out the old one for your spare. That way you know the part fits. It is less likely to break because it is new and you know you have a backup if it does break.

Do you have a green machine

Paul L
The wisdom of Hal Roth still works, no matter what kind of part it is.......i2f
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Old 17-12-2008, 08:08   #9
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i2f???? wazzat mean?
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Old 17-12-2008, 10:27   #10
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Originally Posted by Chuck Baier View Post
I am not find this to be the case, as a matter of fact it seems that the products labeled made in the USA have the same or maybe even higher failure rates than those made overseas. It usually comes down to design flaws, poor quality components, and a general lack of quality control at the factory regardless of what country it is put together in.
Think Microsoft Windows - designed and built in the USA.

Paul L
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Old 17-12-2008, 11:33   #11
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Hal Roth was an advocate of buying spares. Put the new item on, and the old one in the box. That way you knew from the beginning the spare would work. It was the originl, and working when you took it off......WISDOM
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Old 17-12-2008, 15:05   #12
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Thanks for the input everyone.

One further issue is that many new engine parts don't come painted. This means that if you are installing the new part permanently, you have to:

1. Remove the existing functioning part
2. Install the new part to make sure it works
3. Remove the new part
4. Paint it
5. Reinstall the new painted part

If you're dealing with a fuel lift pump or a freshwater cooling system, this can become quite burdensome.
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Old 17-12-2008, 15:11   #13
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we don't have any problem painting a part in place without removing it just for painting.
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Old 17-12-2008, 15:24   #14
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The only sure fire way to prevent problems with spares is to NOT have the equipment on board in the first place. Baring that, the most sensible answer would be to do as others have mentioned, put the new part on and keep the old as the spare. Another good thing about doing this, you'll know for sure weather or not you have all the correct tools needed. Kinda no brainer there, no offense intended.
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Old 17-12-2008, 15:51   #15
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RTBATES:

Wise advice with respect to the tools. You never know what you need until you get into it. I had to fabricate a special tool from an allen wrench in order to remove our starter.

Also, painting in place is great if you have the clearance. It's difficult to get 360 degree access to most of our parts like the lift fuel pump and starter, hence our desire to uninstall components.
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