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Old 25-11-2007, 07:18   #16
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I have Jabsco unit, reversible pump on top of a 5 gallon bucket, works good for both engine and trans and it will pump really hot fluids of almost any kind.

I really wonder why marinized diesels don't have the drain plug at the low point of the sump which is usually the back of the engine. Ours has a drain tube for oil changes on the drain plug which is ingeniously mounted at the front of the pan, almost the highest elevation. I can get more oil sucking from the dipstick tube, but for sure I can't get it all. I feel this is partly why diesel oil goes black so fast there is always a cup or two leftover to contaminate the new oil.

My Kubota tractor has two drains in the sump, I let it drain overnight when I change oil and I can go 50 hours before the oil starts to go black. The oil in the Kubota engine in the boat goes black about 5 hours after it's changed, both engines are within 50 hours of each other and they both work great. I know, I know, it's just soot, but I still hate that. If I ever have to pull the pan for any reason it's going to a machine shop to have the drain plug moved to the low spot in the pan, then the drain tube on it will actually be useful.
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Old 25-11-2007, 07:56   #17
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Originally Posted by jdoe71 View Post
I really wonder why marinized diesels don't have the drain plug at the low point of the sump which is usually the back of the engine. Ours has a drain tube for oil changes on the drain plug which is ingeniously mounted at the front of the pan, almost the highest elevation. I can get more oil sucking from the dipstick tube, but for sure I can't get it all. I feel this is partly why diesel oil goes black so fast there is always a cup or two leftover to contaminate the new oil.
LOL...I know what you mean. It seems the engineers never do any maintenance on their engines. Then theres the boat builder. Could they have made my engine anymore difficult to work on? I dont think so .

In order the change the impeller I have to remove the pump. The secondary fuel filter is a major PITA, and the oil filter isn't much easier. I was going to try and remove the heat exchanger to have it dipped, but I backed out because you have to remove the entire exhaust manifold ...and the list goes on, and on, and on

Thanks for all the input folks
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Old 25-11-2007, 09:31   #18
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oil change

Whatever system you use it will go much faster if you run the engine a bit to warm the oil up first. This will make it easier to pump out and will stir up any sludge on the bottom of the pan.
Steve Willett
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Old 25-11-2007, 15:53   #19
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Here is the one I use. I really like that it lies flat on the floor and is not in danger of tipping over.

West Marine: Flat Tank Oil Changer System Product Display
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Old 25-11-2007, 18:03   #20
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My little Volvo 2003 doesn't have a sump plug for draining oil, so I bought a nifty little oil change pump that pumps the oil via a tube that slips down the dipstick tube. It cost me about $15 and seems to work just fine.

another question about changing oil. assuming I am doing an oil change (and changing filters too, is there any stuff that you should pur into the engine and pump out again to clean the sump prior to refilling, or is it best to just pump out the old oil and pour in the new?
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Old 25-11-2007, 18:19   #21
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another question about changing oil. assuming I am doing an oil change (and changing filters too, is there any stuff that you should pur into the engine and pump out again to clean the sump prior to refilling, or is it best to just pump out the old oil and pour in the new?
Not recomended.
Regular oil and filter changes will keep sludge from building up.

Who changes the oil without changing the filter anyway?
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Old 26-11-2007, 21:36   #22
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Went with the Oil Boy Fluid Extractor

I returned the one I purchased the other day, and today I purchased the Oil Boy Fluid Extractor...AWESOME, AWESOME, AWESOME!

As I had mentioned, in years past I have borrowed my friends electric changer (Jasbco model with the bucket) and it was very slow, maybe 10 minutes to draw all the oil out plus it uses power fro the battery. I almost bought it but the $150.00+ price seemed to much.

The Oil Boy on the other hand is simple and easy to use. The oil was out in less than 5 minutes. I liked that I could easily view how much oil had been removed and the spout at the top made it easy to discard the waste. No motor to go bad and cost $65.00

Did I say it was AWESOME! Thanks for the input from all.

BTW...is there a place on this forum where we can post "Product Reviews" I would like to mention it somewhere here for future inquires.

West Marine: Oil Boy Fluid Extractor Kit Product Display



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Old 27-11-2007, 20:08   #23
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I am in the business here in Baltimore

I have tried them all.

Electric with and without attached pails.

I found the ones with pails were unstable if partially filled.

Sometimes there wasn't adequate 12 volt power

The Metal ones that you pump up rust.

I have two Oil Boys....one is dedicated to oil the other to water. (especially nice if you have to evacuate water out of a full head)

They are both 3 years old and I have lost count on the oil changes I have done


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I returned the one I purchased the other day, and today I purchased the Oil Boy Fluid Extractor...AWESOME, AWESOME, AWESOME!

As I had mentioned, in years past I have borrowed my friends electric changer (Jasbco model with the bucket) and it was very slow, maybe 10 minutes to draw all the oil out plus it uses power fro the battery. I almost bought it but the $150.00+ price seemed to much.

The Oil Boy on the other hand is simple and easy to use. The oil was out in less than 5 minutes. I liked that I could easily view how much oil had been removed and the spout at the top made it easy to discard the waste. No motor to go bad and cost $65.00

Did I say it was AWESOME! Thanks for the input from all.

BTW...is there a place on this forum where we can post "Product Reviews" I would like to mention it somewhere here for future inquires.

West Marine: Oil Boy Fluid Extractor Kit Product Display

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Old 28-11-2007, 08:02   #24
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I'd guess they don't need the business. On engines of our size it's not really needed.
Curious why you say it is not really needed on an engine our size. It seems with the way a boat is used it would be very benificial. The engine may not get run for a week or two so wouldn't it be good to pump oil in to the journals prior to cranking? Wouldn't most of the oil drain down while the engine sits?
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Old 28-11-2007, 08:53   #25
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Got a tempo, works great and was fairly cheap.
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Old 28-11-2007, 09:01   #26
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Got a tempo, works great and was fairly cheap.
I think Temp was bought by Moeller marine Products and now marketed by them
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Old 28-11-2007, 10:05   #27
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Curious why you say it is not really needed on an engine our size. It seems with the way a boat is used it would be very benificial. The engine may not get run for a week or two so wouldn't it be good to pump oil in to the journals prior to cranking? Wouldn't most of the oil drain down while the engine sits?
Because these engines are known for lasting north of 10,000 hours with ordinary care. If your only going to use the boat the national average of 100 hrs a year. It'll take 100 years for the engine to wear out. I could better spend the $250 on something else.

Side note, I've never had a marine diesel have a rod failure yet. Just my $.02 USD
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Old 28-11-2007, 11:20   #28
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I have one of these. The model 902, works great!!


X-change-RŪ Oil Change Systems Reversible Impeller Gear Oil Pumps Marine Service Maintenance
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Old 28-11-2007, 20:57   #29
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It could be beneficial....but when you look at the

distance that the oil has to travel in a small engine, they get oil pressure fairly quick.

On all the Tugs I have worked on, and on the Former Royal Navy Vessel I am Chief on, there is a considerable distance/volume for the oil to travel/fill. The Pre-lube time on the Paxmans are about 45-60 seconds....til pressure shows on the gauges in the MCR.

When I worked with EMDs and Fairbanks.Morse OPs the prelube time was sometime a little longer in cold weather.

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Curious why you say it is not really needed on an engine our size. It seems with the way a boat is used it would be very benificial. The engine may not get run for a week or two so wouldn't it be good to pump oil in to the journals prior to cranking? Wouldn't most of the oil drain down while the engine sits?
For our little saiboat engines it's not needed. Plus some of the *&^%* marine architects barely leave enuf room for gettin a wrench into some spots. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
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