Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 26-07-2009, 21:58   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Boat: 1993 Lagoon 37 TPI
Posts: 124
Installation of Aluminum Fuel Tanks

I am replacing the 46-gallon fuel tank on my 1979 Pearson 365 with two smaller tanks and have a question about the installation of the new tanks.

In an article on how to install aluminum fuel tanks, David Pascoe indicates that two inch strips of Haysite (or other fiber reinforced plastic sheet) should be attached to the bottom of the tanks with 3M 5200 so as to separate the tanks from the supporting platform, thus allowing the circulation of air and the prevention of crevice corrosion.

My problem is that I can’t find a local source of Haysite. Is there another material that will work? King Starboard is a thought, but 5200 won’t stick to it, which appears to be important. Does anyone have any expert advice on the installation of aluminum tanks?
__________________

__________________
Mike Sibley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-07-2009, 22:46   #2
Registered User
 
CaptG's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Honolulu,HI
Boat: 26ft Navy Whaleboat
Posts: 52
Images: 3
I replaced my aluminum tanks 1 year ago which had corroded at the point of contact with fiberglass thus trapping moisture. I used 1/4 inch thick by 3 inch wide neoprene rubber strips and 5200. It seems to be working great.
__________________

__________________
Aloha.........Gerry
CaptG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2009, 12:43   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Boat: 1993 Lagoon 37 TPI
Posts: 124
Installation of Aluminum Fuel Tanks

I guess another alternative is to coat the bottom of the tanks with epoxy, but I have heard both pros and cons of this approach. If I were going to have this done at a good boat yard, how would they do it?
__________________
Mike Sibley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-07-2009, 17:20   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Corpus Christi Texas
Boat: boatless atm
Posts: 723
Send a message via MSN to bobfnbw
Mike I used 2x2 inch by 60" long strips of HDPE from mcmaster carr. I did not try to glue it but just sat it down in the bilge. The tank I coated with marine tex epoxy and then painted with interlux bilgekote. I believe it would have worked out ok as the weight of the tank with fuel would have kept things down, but before I could finish the installation, the boat sank, the tank filled with sea water and everything got messed up.
I plan on having a new tank built, and painting it with bilgekote. and using the same strips of HDPE to keep the bottom of the tank off the bilge floor. My tank sits in bilge water so its a big problem. I put in a small diaphram pump to try to keep the water level lower than the tank.
Far as I know this stuff can't be glued with any reliability.
Hope this helps.
Bob
McMaster-Carr
__________________
bobfnbw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-07-2009, 18:27   #5
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,339
Mc Master/Carr also carries the FRP materials the original poster asked about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobfnbw View Post
Mike I used 2x2 inch by 60" long strips of HDPE from mcmaster carr. I did not try to glue it but just sat it down in the bilge. The tank I coated with marine tex epoxy and then painted with interlux bilgekote. I believe it would have worked out ok as the weight of the tank with fuel would have kept things down, but before I could finish the installation, the boat sank, the tank filled with sea water and everything got messed up.
I plan on having a new tank built, and painting it with bilgekote. and using the same strips of HDPE to keep the bottom of the tank off the bilge floor. My tank sits in bilge water so its a big problem. I put in a small diaphram pump to try to keep the water level lower than the tank.
Far as I know this stuff can't be glued with any reliability.
Hope this helps.
Bob
McMaster-Carr
Those materials can be glued with 5200.

I would hesitate to coat the outside of the tank, as any failures will cause localized and accelerated attack. I have seen this MANY times, specifically in coastal areas, in my work as an API oil tank inspector.

I am curious why internal tank linings are not common, as they are VERY common in industrial oil and gasoline tanks and have proven to be very cost effective and reliable.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fuel, fuel tank, installation

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aluminum Propane Tanks Versus Fiberglass? xxuxx Product or Service Reviews & Evaluations 10 13-07-2011 14:04
Cost of Fuel Pump Installation? stormsurf Engines and Propulsion Systems 10 08-06-2009 17:48
Dual fuel tanks knottybuoyz Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 33 29-12-2008 09:01
Aluminum Fuel Tank Problem Benny Construction, Maintenance & Refit 8 30-03-2007 16:10
Fuel Tanks 1sailaway General Sailing Forum 7 03-11-2004 03:53



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:06.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.