Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 06-08-2013, 18:15   #16
Marine Service Provider
 
boatpoker's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Toronto, Ontario or Bahamas
Boat: Benford 38 Fantail Cruiser
Posts: 2,593
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

many years ago I made new fuel lines for my Perkins out of automotive brake line tubing. As far as I know they are still working.
__________________

__________________
That hysterical laughter you hear as you sail a way in your "new" boat ..... is the seller.
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2013, 18:57   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 44
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

River Cruiser, the engine cranks at its normal speed. Yes, I should change the secondary filter, but not sure where to get one for a Westerbeke. "If it still won't start the supple pump pressure may be low, you'll need fittings & a gauge to check this."...where would I get this, and how effective is a gauge when it comes to measuring pressure pulses that jump to 1,900 psi and back in an instant--just wondering.

Charliehows, the engine was running, but after sitting for 6 weeks it would crank, but not catch. Fuel was not flowing because of sludge in the tank pickup screen. Removed the screen and replaced with a Racor primary filter. Then bled the system and cranked--it didn't catch. Moved the injector outside the engine and it didn't pop when cranking. So, I assume the injector is bad, or the injector pump is bad, or I didn't get all the air out when bleeding the system.

Maybe I will take the fuel injector to the shop and have them test it for pop pressure. That would eliminate one variable.

Alan
__________________

__________________
agilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2013, 19:46   #18
Senior Cruiser
 
River Cruiser's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: UMR mm 283 /winter in Kansas
Boat: Bayliner 3870 41' oal.
Posts: 817
The supply pump psi is normally about 50 to 70 psi on most of the diesels I've worked on. There should be a test port on the engine mounted filter, the supply pump pushes fuel to the injector pump & keeps the system pressurized. Some are built into the pump & some like Perkins have a remote mounted pump similar carbureted gas engine. If the supple pump doesn't maintain the proper pressure on the system the injector pump can't perform it's job of sending a quick shot of high pressure fuel to the injector. Some systems also have check valves in the low pressure side to help maintain the supply pressure. My Westerbeke gen uses a electric supply pump, you might check & see what type of pump you have. You said you could see fuel moving thru a clear line, that would seem to indicate the supply pump is working but it may not be building the required pressure. No air in the system is a absolute must, any doubts about the work you've done go back & make sure all fittings & clamps are tight, all rubber hoses in good condition. Good luck
__________________
River Cruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 08:55   #19
cruiser

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Tampa to New York
Boat: Morgan 33 OutIsland, Magic and 33' offshore scott design "Cutting Edge"
Posts: 1,594
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Try taking some silicone lubricant spray and using it for starting fluid. I had an episode last year when I bled and bled and bled with no start, took someones advice on this forum and tried the silicone and it popped right off. No idea what was wrong but I replaced a bunch of stuff trying to get it started before trying this. I keep a can in the engine compartment now.
__________________
forsailbyowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 11:32   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 44
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Quote:
Originally Posted by forsailbyowner View Post
Try taking some silicone lubricant spray and using it for starting fluid. I had an episode last year when I bled and bled and bled with no start, took someones advice on this forum and tried the silicone and it popped right off. No idea what was wrong but I replaced a bunch of stuff trying to get it started before trying this. I keep a can in the engine compartment now.
Interesting. So i just spray it in the air intake while cranking?
__________________
agilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 13:21   #21
Senior Cruiser
 
River Cruiser's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: UMR mm 283 /winter in Kansas
Boat: Bayliner 3870 41' oal.
Posts: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by agilmore View Post

Interesting. So i just spray it in the air intake while cranking?
WD40 will work also, just spray a little in the intake while cranking. Good luck
__________________
River Cruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2013, 04:21   #22
cruiser

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Tampa to New York
Boat: Morgan 33 OutIsland, Magic and 33' offshore scott design "Cutting Edge"
Posts: 1,594
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

i tried wd before silicone spray. In my case i didnt work, I was told the silicone had a lower flash point or something, but it worked. Yes spray in intake while cranking.
__________________
forsailbyowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2013, 19:36   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 44
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

The Fine Art of Bleeding Diesels
A.K.A. How I finally got my diesel running.

I thought it was simple, loosen the injector nut while cranking, wait for it to squirt, then tighten—not so.

This method did not work, but a subtle variation did work.

First, the problem. Apparently, the issue is that if the nut is loosened too much, the air can be sucked back into the injector by virtue of the fact that a gap can exist between the fuel tubing and the injector due to the nut being too loose.

Solution:
Tighten the nut enough to preventing air intake—but leave it loose enough that the 2,900 psi will push the fuel past it. But how do I tighten the nut to that magical torque?

Method:
1. Loosened the nut ¾ of a turn.
2. Crank the engine until fuel squirts.
3. Continue cranking, and slowly tighten the nut until snug. I used about 40 seconds to do this.
4. At this point the bleeding is done, and the nut can be torqued to spec.

Why does this work? During this slow tightening, that magical point is reached where there is enough pressure to keep the air out, but allow the fuel to squirt. Since you are slowly tightening the nut over the course of about 40 seconds, it takes five or ten seconds to pass through that magical point, and during that time the bleeding is completed.

This is my own recipe, and I have not seen it anywhere else. Please feel free to comment. I would be interested to see if anyone has had the same experience. Also, has anyone found a similar but better way?

Alan Gilmore

P.S. I should also mention that my diesel did start spraying fuel from the injector at this point, but would not fire until I pulled the cold weather start lever (silicone spray and WD40 did not help). I suppose the system needed to get an extra shot of fuel to goose the engine . . . ?
__________________
agilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 03:15   #24
cruiser

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Tampa to New York
Boat: Morgan 33 OutIsland, Magic and 33' offshore scott design "Cutting Edge"
Posts: 1,594
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Please dont crank your engine for 40 seconds continuously. thats too much cranking at one time for the starter. No longer than 15 seconds is what I read
__________________
forsailbyowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 06:59   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 44
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Quote:
Originally Posted by forsailbyowner View Post
Please dont crank your engine for 40 seconds continuously. thats too much cranking at one time for the starter. No longer than 15 seconds is what I read
My engine (Westerbeke 11A is rated for 20 seconds of cranking, and yes, I did give it 30 seconds of rest between two 20 second cranks.

Thanks for pointing this out. I should have mentioned it.

Alan
__________________
agilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 07:41   #26
Registered User
 
psneeld's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Avalon, NJ
Boat: Albin 40 double cabin Trawler
Posts: 1,834
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Not sure I would spray silicone into my engine...it was probably the propellant or solvents actually burning and who knows what the silicone is doing if left behind at high temps.

WD has worked for many although I have never tried it.

Many say no either but there is diesel starting fluid with lubricant in it. Most mechs I know just saturate a rag and hold it over the air intake rather than a direct spray. The old company I worked for used the diesel starting fluid all the time with no ill effects. I'm guessing it is an improvement over ether that some will tell you will blow a diesel.
__________________
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 08:26   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 2,438
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

I just had a spark of memory from my ill spent youth. I can see it is a day late, and I am glad that you have had success. During this whole process, did you close your raw water intake? I once went through the bleeding process about ten times and could not get a motor to start. The motor finally kicked off and shot water out of the exhaust like a fire hose for a few seconds. All of that cranking fills your exhaust system with water that can create enough back pressure to keep the engine from starting. A normal start only takes a few seconds, so little water builds up, but bleeding or any other problem that takes cranking time can cause the back pressure. Just a thought._______Grant.
__________________
gjordan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 08:53   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 44
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Not sure I would spray silicone into my engine...it was probably the propellant or solvents actually burning and who knows what the silicone is doing if left behind at high temps.

WD has worked for many although I have never tried it.

Many say no either but there is diesel starting fluid with lubricant in it. Most mechs I know just saturate a rag and hold it over the air intake rather than a direct spray. The old company I worked for used the diesel starting fluid all the time with no ill effects. I'm guessing it is an improvement over ether that some will tell you will blow a diesel.
Yes, I was a bit concerned about using ether because I thought it might be to explosive. I have never heard of diesel starting fluid, so I will keep my eye open for it, unless you have a suggestion as to where I can purchase it?

Alan
__________________
agilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 08:57   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 44
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gjordan View Post
During this whole process, did you close your raw water intake? I once went through the bleeding process about ten times and could not get a motor to start. The motor finally kicked off and shot water out of the exhaust like a fire hose for a few seconds. All of that cranking fills your exhaust system with water that can create enough back pressure to keep the engine from starting. A normal start only takes a few seconds, so little water builds up, but bleeding or any other problem that takes cranking time can cause the back pressure. Just a thought._______Grant.
Yes, I closed the raw water intake because I didn't want water backing up into the combustion cylinder, locking the piston, and breaking a connecting rod.

Alan
__________________
agilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-08-2013, 10:05   #30
Registered User
 
psneeld's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Avalon, NJ
Boat: Albin 40 double cabin Trawler
Posts: 1,834
Re: Injector Fuel Line: DIY? How hard can that be to make?

Quote:
Originally Posted by agilmore View Post
Yes, I was a bit concerned about using ether because I thought it might be to explosive. I have never heard of diesel starting fluid, so I will keep my eye open for it, unless you have a suggestion as to where I can purchase it?

Alan
It's a CRC product...

Amazon.com: CRC 05671 Jump Start Starting Fluid with Lubricity - 11 Wt Oz.: Automotive
__________________

__________________
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fuel

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:41.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.