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Old 16-06-2008, 10:51   #1
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Center engine

Was dreaming of a larger boat and came across a Tartan 30.

This one has the engine midship and appears to be easy to access. I got to thinking about the shaft and wonder if this could be a problem? Also in case of major change out will it come out?
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Old 16-06-2008, 13:41   #2
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Located off-centre to eliminate torque, the engine is set in the forward end of the main cabin to concentrate its weight (together with fuel and water tanks) over the centre of ballast, and reduce pitching moment. The engine is mounted on directly over the lead keel.

There are several advantages to the engine location in the T-30:
1) The prop is just aft of the keel where it will not snag lines etc underway.
2) Excellent engine access for maintenance and repair.
3) Improved sailing performance with the 200 lb engine amidships.
4) You can drive larger yachts crazy when you appear to sail past them with no transom exhaust to indicate that the engine is running.
5) Remember that the T-30 was originally set up with a stand-pipe exhaust in the head. I'm sure that all of these have now been replaced /w side exhaust.
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Old 16-06-2008, 14:52   #3
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Should have known

Gordy,
Thanks for the input. Should have known you would have a handle on this. Thanks again.
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Old 16-06-2008, 14:56   #4
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On a 40 foot Searunner tri, with a center cockpit, the engine is normally mounted on the port (or starboard) side of the centerboard trunk (hence the center cockpit). This, as Gord observed, puts the weight low and central. The fuel tank is located on the other side, to provide some counterweight when full. The shaft is 1" stainless, a whopping 17' long, coupling to prop. There are two pillar block bearings in the intermediate frames, about 40" apart, then the shaft log, aand then the propshaft strut with cutlass bearing, followed last by a Martec Mark III folding prop. When aligned properly, there is very little vibration, some 1/16" ripples on my coffee cup on the galley table above the shaft strut in the sterncastle. There is, of course, a CLUNK!, when shifting from forward to reverse and back, due to the props opening and closing, but nothing to be anxious about. Long shaft runs are not a problem if you have stuff well supported and STRAIGHT.
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Old 16-06-2008, 15:53   #5
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T30 prop shaft

When I hauled out Immrama (1973 T30) in March to paint the bottom and replace the cutlass bearing, the mechanic at the yard found wear and scoring on the original bronze propellar shaft. This happened at the intermediate bearing located under the raised portion of the cabin sole between the engine and the point where the shaft exits to the water. This bearing is not so much a bearing, it has no roller or ball bearings or anthing and relied on lubrication alone. When we removed the shaft it also showed signs of pinking, as a result of a galvanic reaction. We ended up replacing shaft (with stainless steel, bronze was not to be found), the intermdiate bearing, and the cutlass bearing. Lining up the shaft properly, especially with the intermediate bearing, was critical and required some fabrication for the intermediate. Since then, the propulsion system has worked great except for a harmonic squeal at 1000 RPM, a very useful speed on my boat, that seems to be decreasing as it breaks in. I also have a small grease gun and lubricate that bearing religiously, although it probably took 30 years for the first one to fail.

That said, the T30 is a great sailing boat. I have the original Atomic four engine and a three bladed prop so it also motors well, at least in forward. Throw it into reverse, and you probably have time to go below and get a cold drink while the boat thinks about moving backwards. If you get to the point in looking at a T30 that you have it hauled out, be sure the lift operator knows the location of the prop. Usually they try to snug the aft strap up to the keel which is right where the prop is located. WOrth marking lift points on the hull.

The only weakness I personally have encountered is the effort involved in the shift linkage because of the distance involved. I found myself coming into my slip not only unable to sift into reverse, but unable to get out of forward. Luckily, my engine starts easily and I was able kill and restart, then kill and drift. The repair was simple requiring a large screwdriver, a flexible rubber sink stopper, and a few four letter words.

The Tartan is a great boat, happy in 30+ knot winds (reefed properly) or in 10 knots. I regularly single hand mine or comfortably have 3 friends aboard for long weekends. Let me know what you find.
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Old 17-06-2008, 07:56   #6
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Robin,

Thanks for the input. Any other spots to look out for. On my 27 the chainplates are encased in FG kneewalls and after 30 yrs or so need replacing.

I am considering a couple. One in Fl. still has the A-4. Have looked on line not sure whether I prefer the rear galley or side. From pictures looks like the side galley frees up space under the cockpit.
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Old 18-06-2008, 08:34   #7
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more Tartan

I don't know how much of this is of general interest. so I'll be brief and you can email me if you want for more.

If you like your 27 you will like the 30. The extra beam translates into extra headroom and a great interior with the tradtional styling of your 27. I have the side galley, heavily modified, full sink, stove with oven, and a small capacity but great performing Engel fridge. There is a ton of space aft with the two berths and space under the cockpit. I am still struggling with how to best use that space. I have crates in the center behind my house battery bank, and stuff just gets tossed onto the berths now.

My chainplates were exposed so easily checked and less likely to harbor moisture. Also, I have an additional set of supports, triangular in side view that was common on boats with the baby stay (or whatever the precise term) for an additional foresail. I have the original around the boom roller furling system on the main. First thing, I had a sailmaker put in reef points and the hardwear for slab reefing. I much prefer. The rigging and hardware that was original to the T30 was excellent.

Immrama has a well installed edson pedestal and wheel steering. Most of my experience the last 7-8 years was with bigger (charter) boats so the wheel felt very comfortable to me. All the original tiller hardware was retained so the emergency steering is re-attaching the tiller itself. The wheel is always in the way. So, if you like the tiller on your T27, I would think you would be happier with a tiller than a wheel on the T30.

I don't want to ramble on too much. The T30 is just a real pleasure to sail. The 150 percent genoa contributes to great light air performance, while the boat is solid and controlled and still fun in 30 knot winds. My 35 year old boat had no blisters when hauled out for the purchase survey and still looks great.

Good luck.
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