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Old 09-02-2010, 15:19   #1
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BMW Marine Diesel D7

Does anyone have any experience with this little BMW d7? It is very small and light (which I like) . But I know no one that has had one. Any story would help steer me into or away from this thing. I do not want a nightmare for parts or labor.

BMW Marine Engines by V12 Engineering - Engines - D7 Diesel

http://www.bmwmarine.net/manuals/fix...s%20Manual.pdf
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Old 09-02-2010, 15:22   #2
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I think the page you linked says it all. The engine has been discontinued for years. Nobody except that supplier is stocking the parts, and they're still "coming along" with that.
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Old 09-02-2010, 15:33   #3
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Run Away!.....just kidding..(sort of).....but you do go for the cutting edge stuff don't you Jack..
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Old 09-02-2010, 16:32   #4
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seriously, RUN AWAY. It's next to the Renault Hunter used. As king of scarce parts. The flywheel charging system never works.
If you have an inkling it's dead, consider it dead and move on.
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Old 09-02-2010, 16:50   #5
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Thanks a bunch guys....there is a reason I have never seen one! I am running!....better no engine than a bad engine....
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Old 09-02-2010, 17:18   #6
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I had a single cylinder BMW diesel in a 30' uldb in So Cal in the late 80s. Man what a miserable excuse for an engine, had it rebuilt 3 times, not because of lack of performance but because nobody could get the blasted shaking beast to quit leaking oil for more than a few hours. RUN David
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Old 09-02-2010, 17:26   #7
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Sort of like a Harley...
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Old 09-02-2010, 17:29   #8
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I have one in an aloha 8.2 and it seems to run fine but ive only had the boat one summer and didnt use it much so i cant say one way or another,i can say that its a primative little thing (not a bad thing) but ive got to agree with the others,give it a pass.
Steve.
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Old 09-02-2010, 19:17   #9
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Thanks to all of you. Maybe we could start a new thread. I'd rather go without, than have a bad one......we could post items we could do without.
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Old 09-02-2010, 19:55   #10
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COOL!!!...I will start..
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Old 24-01-2011, 14:58   #11
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BMW Marine D7 Diesel

BMW D7 MARINE ENGINE WEB FORUM looks usefull.

Cheers.
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Old 24-12-2012, 11:03   #12
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Re: BMW Marine Diesel D7

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Originally Posted by Jmolan View Post
Does anyone have any experience with this little BMW d7? It is very small and light (which I like) . But I know no one that has had one. Any story would help steer me into or away from this thing. I do not want a nightmare for parts or labor.

BMW Marine Engines by V12 Engineering - Engines - D7 Diesel

http://www.bmwmarine.net/manuals/fix...s%20Manual.pdf
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$$$$

Sorry if this reply is years too late but it may help someone else.

BMW quit the marine business ages ago. However if it is any help the base engine for the BMW D7 is a HATZ HE673 There used to be a parts list for these somewhere on the Internet and George Huxtable also used to have a lovely website about the BMW D7.

Good points are that the Hatz has an iron head on an iron cylinder barrel so differential expansion is not a problem. Cast iron is also reasonably durable in sea water unlike some aluminium alloys.

Bad points were the weird flywheel alternator that was regulated by using tertiary coils that were shorted-out by thyristors. The high voltage spikes would cause radio interference and in the long term the windings would be destroyed. (Allegedly this problem can be fixed somehow, probably by using Voltage Dependent Resistors to snub the spikes)

The other bad point is that lubrication is by dipper so it is not possible to have an oil pressure warning light.

Renault also used the Hatz engine in their Renault Couach but in this case a normal car-type alternator was used.

You may need a prayer to St Jude to fix these engines. (LOL!) Even so they are much safer than using a gasoline engine.

At this point I must mention a tale told to me by "Captain Bligh" an accomplished blue water sailor.
Long long ago in Plymouth, England there was a Sea Cadets unit. They had what was known as a Dragon Boat (nothing to do with the Hong Kong boats with the same name) it was a sailing yacht. Allegedly ten cadets were on deck when the skipper undid the padlock and went below smoking a cigarette. The boat had been bouncing around on its moorings for a fortnight and below-decks must have been full of petrol fumes. The boat exploded and the topside was blown-off catapulting the cadets into the sea. The skipper died of his injuries. Take Care!
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Old 29-12-2012, 20:51   #13
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Re: BMW Marine Diesel D7

I have got a Hatz Diesel in a G&M Marine Generator which was bought on an online auction site. It was an extremely bad buy as the oil turned out to be so loaded with iron that it was highly magnetic.

The engine is based on an obsolete Hatz cement mixer engine that has had water cooling added. The water cooled Hatz is an HE673. The lack of an oil pump and filter means that the engine oil should be changed very frequently, say every 50 to 100 hours of running. Sucking the oil out with a pump from the filler hole is NOT GOOD ENOUGH as the drain plug needs to be removed and its magnet needs to be cleaned every time. In effect the sump plug magnet is the oil filter.
My engine is seized solid and I think that the connecting rod is friction welded to the crank-pin. So much for "Won't start or run". In British English an engine which "won't start" is deemed to be one that turns around when cranked by the starter but won't produce any power. "Seized-solid" is something completely different.

On these engines the crank-case is light alloy which does help to keep the weight down. As to the Hatz flywheel generator, this is present on the G&M but is not connected. Nowadays there are other ways of regulating charge current which are superior to shorting-out tertiary coils with Triacs. Something along the lines of a "Simple Switcher" (tm) might be a better bet. For those who still use the flywheel alternator it might be a good idea to fit Zobel Networks and/or Voltage Dependent Resistors to the parts where the voltage spikes are produced.

Sadly George Huxtable who knew a lot about these engines passed away in December 2011. His own engine worked for over twenty years although he did adapt it to use a car alternator after two stator failures.

For parts it is advisable to try an industrial engine specialist first rather than a chandler. Bolts, screws and ball races will be to ISO standards and the sea-water pump is by Johnson so get as much as you can at generic prices.

Performance wise, allegedly these engines do not really have sufficient power to "punch" a 4 knot tide in a 27 foot long keel-boat. At this power level barnacles, excess weight and a coked-up engine can really slow things down. It is an AUXILIARY engine not intended for water-skiing! At these power levels and boat lengths hull speed will only be about 5 knots so running against a 4 knot ebb-tide will result in a speed of only about one knot over the ground. Thrifty sailors will save their fuel and anchor until the currents are more favourable but these days some people will demand 30 HP or more in order to go whenever they want.

Good luck!
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Old 22-05-2013, 11:43   #14
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Re: BMW Marine Diesel D7

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davey1000 View Post
I have got a Hatz Diesel in a G&M Marine Generator which was bought on an online auction site. It was an extremely bad buy as the oil turned out to be so loaded with iron that it was highly magnetic.

The engine is based on an obsolete Hatz cement mixer engine that has had water cooling added. The water cooled Hatz is an HE673. The lack of an oil pump and filter means that the engine oil should be changed very frequently, say every 50 to 100 hours of running. Sucking the oil out with a pump from the filler hole is NOT GOOD ENOUGH as the drain plug needs to be removed and its magnet needs to be cleaned every time. In effect the sump plug magnet is the oil filter.
My engine is seized solid and I think that the connecting rod is friction welded to the crank-pin. So much for "Won't start or run". In British English an engine which "won't start" is deemed to be one that turns around when cranked by the starter but won't produce any power. "Seized-solid" is something completely different.

On these engines the crank-case is light alloy which does help to keep the weight down. As to the Hatz flywheel generator, this is present on the G&M but is not connected. Nowadays there are other ways of regulating charge current which are superior to shorting-out tertiary coils with Triacs. Something along the lines of a "Simple Switcher" (tm) might be a better bet. For those who still use the flywheel alternator it might be a good idea to fit Zobel Networks and/or Voltage Dependent Resistors to the parts where the voltage spikes are produced.

Sadly George Huxtable who knew a lot about these engines passed away in December 2011. His own engine worked for over twenty years although he did adapt it to use a car alternator after two stator failures.

For parts it is advisable to try an industrial engine specialist first rather than a chandler. Bolts, screws and ball races will be to ISO standards and the sea-water pump is by Johnson so get as much as you can at generic prices.

Performance wise, allegedly these engines do not really have sufficient power to "punch" a 4 knot tide in a 27 foot long keel-boat. At this power level barnacles, excess weight and a coked-up engine can really slow things down. It is an AUXILIARY engine not intended for water-skiing! At these power levels and boat lengths hull speed will only be about 5 knots so running against a 4 knot ebb-tide will result in a speed of only about one knot over the ground. Thrifty sailors will save their fuel and anchor until the currents are more favourable but these days some people will demand 30 HP or more in order to go whenever they want.

Good luck!
Davey-
Hope you are still around! Anyway, I've got a BMW D7 in my S2, and knock on wood...it still runs quite well. Parts availability and pricing from V12 Engineering (mentioned above) seems to be pretty good. My question is that you mention a drain plug for the oil. It was my understanding that these engines don't have drain plugs [the owner's manual doesn't mention one]...but I'm willing to be wrong as I hate sucking the oil out through the dip stick hole. Do you think you could point out where this drain plug might be found? Thanks!
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Old 22-05-2013, 13:09   #15
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Re: BMW Marine Diesel D7

[QUOTE=Rhys;1241671]Davey-
Hope you are still around! Anyway, I've got a BMW D7 in my S2, and knock on wood...it still runs quite well. Parts availability and pricing from V12 Engineering (mentioned above) seems to be pretty good. My question is that you mention a drain plug for the oil. It was my understanding that these engines don't have drain plugs [the owner's manual doesn't mention one]...but I'm willing to be wrong as I hate sucking the oil out through the dip stick hole. Do you think you could point out where this drain plug might be found? Thanks![/QUOTE

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

Hi everybody! As of May 2013 I'm still around, not bad for a 1947 model as quite a few later models have already gone kaput!

I will photograph the engine "direkly" and post the photographs. As to spare parts, crankshafts are still available from Bryco at Daimler Road. The cost is in the region of 400 however. When it comes to reclaiming knackered crankshafts forget "spray building" AKA "metal spraying" as a good bond with the parent metal is unlikely to occur. The process of choice is welding using the Gleason Process. As far as I know the crank-pins are MIG welded as the crank goes around in a lathe. Allegedly hard wire is used on most of the journal but a softer wire is used at the fillet radii - clever stuff!

As yet I've not got the beastie apart owing to two rounded-off Allen screws on the sump plate. (removal of this plate gives access to the big-end bolts) Some welding will surely be needed to enable the screws to be turned.

Boat Jumble on Saturday, maybe a spare crank will turn up?
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