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Old 05-07-2010, 17:19   #31
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Can you guys clarify how the belt is to sit? (not about tension) Someone told me it is not to rub an exact "flat" on the pulley but ride a side or edge?? Maybe a better question is - What is the right wear mark on the pulley and belt?
Erika


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Correct, it rides on the side.
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Old 06-07-2010, 08:22   #32
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Quick question before I run to work.
Where can I find the stuff that marks a nut and bolt for checking to see if the nut is backing off due to vibration? (hope that made sense but don't know the name of it)
A friend from way back showed me his engine aboard a union 36, he had painted a yellow stripe on many of the bolts, this stripe would indicate if the nuts position changes. He was also a helicopter pilot/mechanic so maybe this is an airplane thing?

Anyways, can I locktite the alternator adjuster arm bolts? Do you all locktite everything on an engine? The amount of vibration I'd think this is a normal routine but have not heard any reference to it.
Thanks for the info, vacation over, off to work.
Erika
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Old 06-07-2010, 08:27   #33
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Where can I find the stuff that marks a nut and bolt ...
Paint pen.
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Old 06-07-2010, 18:38   #34
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Quick question before I run to work.
Where can I find the stuff that marks a nut and bolt for checking to see if the nut is backing off due to vibration? (hope that made sense but don't know the name of it)
A friend from way back showed me his engine aboard a union 36, he had painted a yellow stripe on many of the bolts, this stripe would indicate if the nuts position changes. He was also a helicopter pilot/mechanic so maybe this is an airplane thing?

Anyways, can I locktite the alternator adjuster arm bolts? Do you all locktite everything on an engine? The amount of vibration I'd think this is a normal routine but have not heard any reference to it.
Thanks for the info, vacation over, off to work.
Erika
OG:

Fingernail polish works well. I have used it to mark locations and it is resilient, long lasting, and inexpensive (at the dollar store). I'm sure you have a nice bright color to use.
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Old 06-07-2010, 18:53   #35
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OG:

Fingernail polish works well. I have used it to mark locations and it is resilient, long lasting, and inexpensive (at the dollar store). I'm sure you have a nice bright color to use.

A nice bright PINK . So a go on the locktite?
Erika
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Old 07-07-2010, 07:39   #36
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I sometimes also use "White Out" or "Liquid Paper" from the office supply store.
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:39   #37
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A nice bright PINK . So a go on the locktite?
Erika
I don't know enough to answer that question. Come on guys I'd like an answer too.
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Old 07-07-2010, 11:31   #38
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A nice bright PINK . So a go on the locktite?
Erika
Pink is a good color. Would't go for locktite; there comes time you need to loosen the nuts. Firm tightening (when you feel it snap simply reverse a quarter turn) should be more than adequate. I'm pretty sure there is not a car driving around with locktite; V-belt tensioning is no different on cars. Never used it on my boat.
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Old 07-07-2010, 12:02   #39
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Ocean Girl,

Here is what you ar looking for. Its called

(page 166 of this catalog http://supco.com/Appliancecatalog200...2-18-06pmd.pdf).




BJ10 - Belt-Jack Instant Belt Tightener
Designed to set belt tension and to help align pulleys on all belt driven units including blower motors,
compressors, transmissions, and automotive components.
• Opens from 4 1/2" to 15" with extender • Heavy duty 3/8-16 thread
BJ10PLUS - Belt-Jack Instant Belt Tightener
Same as BJ10 Plus an extra 6” extension

I dont know if they sell it to you directly, I got the plus from a tool supplier in the Annapolis area from about $24 but in the end did not need the extension so measure the distance between the 2 pulleys before you order it. The regular tensioner was like $16 good luck

V49
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Old 07-07-2010, 12:30   #40
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Got the following at JC Whictney over 30 years ago. Just searched there web site and could not find it. It was under $10.00.
The two top items are extentions.

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Old 07-07-2010, 12:42   #41
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Just had a chat session with Whitney. They don't carry the tentioner anymore.

Gordon
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Old 07-07-2010, 12:43   #42
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It can be a good habit to use some type of thread dressing, either Loctite or anti-seize as appropriate, on every fastener that is subject to vibration or corrosion, as the case may be.

With Loctite you have to remember there are different products and in theory you never want to use the red (permanent) on something you'll be working on again. In practice, Loctite goes stale after about 2 years in the bottle and doesn't work as well, and even the red stuff can be popped with a little heat or a breaker bar.

I can't remember an alternator bolt ever coming loose on me though, without any Loctite. The bolts are usually robust enough that you can torque them down very well and vibration won't move them.

If you're just plunging into wrenching...I might suggest a torque wrench, the kind that goes "click" and pops when it reaches the weight you've set for the job. Not because it is always needed, but because it can teach you "How much is ## pounds?" and once you get the feel for that, you can work without it for most things.

It is possible to overtorque bolts and snap them off, so "as tight as I can" can be just as bad as "I'm afraid to break this".

Loctite also works as intended when it is put on clean metal surfaces--so you can expect it won't help much on old oily ones.
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Old 07-07-2010, 12:44   #43
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Thats the same gizmo as in my previous post. I think that I got a couple of retailers from the Supco.com website.
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Old 07-07-2010, 13:18   #44
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... In practice, Loctite goes stale after about 2 years in the bottle and doesn't work as well, and even the red stuff can be popped with a little heat or a breaker bar.

I can't remember an alternator bolt ever coming loose on me though, without any Loctite. The bolts are usually robust enough that you can torque them down very well and vibration won't move them.

If you're just plunging into wrenching; I might suggest a torque wrench, the kind that goes "click" and pops when it reaches the weight you've set for the job. Not because it is always needed, but because it can teach you "How much is ## pounds?" and once you get the feel for that, you can work without it for most things.

It is possible to overtorque bolts and snap them off, so "as tight as I can" can be just as bad as "I'm afraid to break this"...
Indeed.

Four (or 5) excellent points.
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Old 07-07-2010, 19:49   #45
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It can be a good habit to use some type of thread dressing, either Loctite or anti-seize as appropriate, on every fastener that is subject to vibration or corrosion, as the case may be.

With Loctite you have to remember there are different products and in theory you never want to use the red (permanent) on something you'll be working on again. In practice, Loctite goes stale after about 2 years in the bottle and doesn't work as well, and even the red stuff can be popped with a little heat or a breaker bar.

I can't remember an alternator bolt ever coming loose on me though, without any Loctite. The bolts are usually robust enough that you can torque them down very well and vibration won't move them.

If you're just plunging into wrenching...I might suggest a torque wrench, the kind that goes "click" and pops when it reaches the weight you've set for the job. Not because it is always needed, but because it can teach you "How much is ## pounds?" and once you get the feel for that, you can work without it for most things.

It is possible to overtorque bolts and snap them off, so "as tight as I can" can be just as bad as "I'm afraid to break this".

Loctite also works as intended when it is put on clean metal surfaces--so you can expect it won't help much on old oily ones.
Thanks to all for the great feedback. I will look into a torque wrench, not for fear of over torque but for under, I am not as strong as you guys (aka: delicate wild flower ) My engine is new and my bolts are clean (thank you very much) so I think the surface will be good. I thought loctite is intended to secure the bolt from vibration but also prevent fusing/corrosion, so ease of release (?).
Erika
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