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Old 30-05-2016, 13:05   #31
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

When dragging the engine up the ramp the alignment was off and the end of the drive shaft hung up on the stern tube a bit but didn't cause any damage. I should have just disconnected the shaft at the coupling prior to dragging the engine off the bed and onto the ramp. It would have been easy enough once the engine was ahead a few inches and probably not impossible with the engine in place. Alternatively, the not very precise ramp could have been shimmed at the bottom to get better alignment.

I used a bit of vaseline on the engine bed and ramp prior to winching the engine forward and it slid quite easily. For installation I plan on using wooden pry bars to ease the engine back down the ramp and into position. I did a test and can move it backwards OK by myself but will probably get a helper when it's time to move it back on the engine bed.

I'm still not sure what the best approach is to checking the alignment. With a new cutless bearing and the shaft in place I'm going to check the shaft alignment in the stern tube. If it looks well centered I'm going to then install the new hose and repacked stuffing box and assume the shaft is still well aligned with the stern tube.

At that point the engine will be moved back into position and attached to the bed and I will try to use feeler gauges to check the coupling alignments. Will try to adjust the old mounts as required to get a good alignment. After that I will re-connect the couplings with the engine in position.

Considering the difficulty I had getting the lock nut loose on the stuffing box as well as getting any useful torque on the stuffing box once it's in position I wonder if I should use some kind of anti-seize compound on the stuffing box threads. Has anyone ever tried that? Once everything is back in place it's going to be a big issue trying to get the drip rate set up. Every time I make an adjustment the alternator and air filter will have to be removed. Maybe a few other things as well.

I had another look at access through the port cockpit locker and it looks very poor on my boat. The fuel tank is quite far forward and what little space is available is presently occupied by the fresh water filler hose and manual bilge pump hose. I can pull those out and might be able to get an arm through to "maybe" put a wrench on the stuffing box lock nut while some thin guy with long arms works the
tightening nut but what a PITA that will be.

Geez, after thinking about all that maybe I should install a PSS system.
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Old 30-05-2016, 13:43   #32
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

The PSS is a pain in its own special way. But as it does not need to be serviced for six years or so, it can be tolerated.
The alignment at the coupling is very important. If the engine does not meet the coupling absolutely flat, I am told you could be in for expensive repairs later. That having been said, I did not find it that difficult to achieve.
Get the smallest feeler gauge that you can find, like .001 or so. Without turning the shaft, check for gaps top, bottom, and on each side. Yes, I know this is a pain, but it has to be done. By turning the engine mount bolts and pushing the engine from side to side, this can be done by one man in about one very sweaty hour, or much faster with a helper so you don't have to bounce back and forth. The slop in the cutlass should help some. Also, those Yanmar engine mounts are plenty sloppy in their own right.
Be sure to check for gaps on all sides. Then tighten down the engine mount bolts.
It's not that bad. You are well past the worst of this.
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Old 30-05-2016, 14:03   #33
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

"Considering the difficulty I had getting the lock nut loose on the stuffing box as well as getting any useful torque on the stuffing box once it's in position I wonder if I should use some kind of anti-seize compound on the stuffing box threads. Has anyone ever tried that?"
If the threads are bronze on bronze they usually will break free readily. I have used lanolin or Lan-O-cote on bronze threads though.... they do get dry and crusty for sure...
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Old 30-05-2016, 14:05   #34
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

Do a rough alignment then fine tune it after its in the water. Boats flex abit and alignment will change in the water.
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Old 30-05-2016, 14:38   #35
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
"Considering the difficulty I had getting the lock nut loose on the stuffing box as well as getting any useful torque on the stuffing box once it's in position I wonder if I should use some kind of anti-seize compound on the stuffing box threads. Has anyone ever tried that?"
If the threads are bronze on bronze they usually will break free readily. I have used lanolin or Lan-O-cote on bronze threads though.... they do get dry and crusty for sure...
I have some Lan-O-cote so will probably apply a bit of that when putting things back together. I think the stuffing box hadn't been adjusted for a very long time leading to the seize up.
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Old 30-05-2016, 14:58   #36
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

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Originally Posted by Badsanta View Post
Do a rough alignment then fine tune it after its in the water. Boats flex abit and alignment will change in the water.
Some of the local help mentioned that to me as well. I think with the short shaft, compound curves, and bulkheads in that part of the B-32 it may be stiffer than most but would be an interesting thing to check.

It's going to be interesting checking the alignment while out of the water as well. With everything put back together but the engine mounts untouched I'm curious if there has been any significant droop with the 20 year old [guesstimated] Yanmar mounts.

Really, the more I think about it the more I realize I should have disconnected the shaft instead of dragging everything forward in one piece. I could have checked the current alignment at the point for any significant issues related to the engine mounts.
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Old 16-06-2016, 12:27   #37
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

Got my B-32 back in the water more or less on schedule. The engine removal ramp system I used worked quite well and I didn't require any help getting the engine back in position. I was able to walk the engine back down the ramp using a 2x2 as a pry bar.

The engine had been removed at the bed so once reinstalled the engine was "theoretically" unchanged from its previous position. I checked the alignment on the hard and it was within the Yanmar 5/1000 tolerance so I didn't bother making any adjustments.

The only motoring I've done so far is to get the boat from the slip to the berth. More extensive motoring trials to be done next week to set up the drip rate on the stuffing box. Also, will probably try to check the shaft alignment again with the boat in the water.

I've attached a couple of photos of the ramp system. It was easy to build and worked well. It is possible to drag the engine, transmission and drive shaft forward as one unit with this set up but the ramp alignment would have to be very precise for boats with longer prop shafts. Better to disconnect the drive shaft if able.
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Old 16-06-2016, 15:16   #38
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

Good job. I bet it feels good to get that out of the way. Actually... I know it does. I'm sure the sea trials will go well, also. Wish I could come see the job you did! My B32, Eider, splashes tomorrow. I know they can be a pain to work on, but they are good, sturdy sea boats, and I can't wait to get back on the water in mine.
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Old 18-06-2016, 05:40   #39
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

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Originally Posted by MaritimeBristol View Post
Got my B-32 back in the water more or less on schedule. The engine removal ramp system I used worked quite well and I didn't require any help getting the engine back in position. I was able to walk the engine back down the ramp using a 2x2 as a pry bar.



The engine had been removed at the bed so once reinstalled the engine was "theoretically" unchanged from its previous position. I checked the alignment on the hard and it was within the Yanmar 5/1000 tolerance so I didn't bother making any adjustments.



The only motoring I've done so far is to get the boat from the slip to the berth. More extensive motoring trials to be done next week to set up the drip rate on the stuffing box. Also, will probably try to check the shaft alignment again with the boat in the water.



I've attached a couple of photos of the ramp system. It was easy to build and worked well. It is possible to drag the engine, transmission and drive shaft forward as one unit with this set up but the ramp alignment would have to be very precise for boats with longer prop shafts. Better to disconnect the drive shaft if able.

Looking at your engine space brings back not so fond memories of lying on top of the engine in the tunnel to service the stuffing bix on my old Luders 33.

Neat parquet cabin sole, incidentally.


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Old 18-06-2016, 09:14   #40
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Re: A problem with a Bristol 32

I'm starting to think that working on old boats is a bit of an art form. It seems to require some imagination and patience. When connecting the coupling bolts I was able to kneel on the ramp and work my way into the tunnel a bit further than previous attempts. I think a proper sized platform or maybe a small folding table placed in front of the engine might allow some further improvement.

The parquet sole was probably installed over 20 years ago! It needs a refinish but is otherwise in good shape. In the early/mid 1990s the boat got some extensive work done to make it a comfortable [but small!] live a board. From what I've seen the boat had a small microwave, TV/VCR combo unit, refrigeration unit in the ice box, shore power hot water tank, and wiring for an air conditioner although I have no idea how that was mounted. Maybe a small unit that could be mounted in a hatch when berthed.

The refrigeration unit and hot water tank are no longer serviceable but the engine/drive train have held up well, the wind generator still works after 20+ years, and the external work done to hull, deck and rigging was high quality and probably the main reason the boat is still serviceable after 50 years.

For my plans I can do without some of the luxuries but will concentrate on maintaining the basic structure and systems.

For many folks, the small cabin is probably a show stopper and the B32 does have some quirks but I'm starting to appreciate the clean and simple design and agree with Mainebristol, it's a good sturdy [and forgiving] boat.
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