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Old 10-04-2006, 11:30   #1
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Panama City Beach, Florida
Boat: Jim Brown, Searunner 37, Moon
Posts: 19
Wanted: Searunner views

Getting ready to head off for parts unknown in January 2007 with our Searunner 37. We would love to hear any stories or advice on this boat.
We think she is ready to go, but we need a topping lift and a bottom job and 2 small sail repairs. I'm familiar with cats...this is my first trimaran and my first center cockpit. I have tons of questions...too many to list!!!
Is there a formula for weight in the amas?
What degrees can she successfully heel?
Why would she come without a topping lift? She has a full canvas canopy that my husband has stated will never come down unless we're in a storm, (whatever makes him happy!!!!), but it restricts the adjustments we can make on the boom.

If you can think of anything about a Searunner, I have probably have a question about it. Feel free with any info. Thanks already from Don and Ellen Jamison and "Moon".
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Old 16-04-2006, 00:15   #2
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Minneapolis MN
Boat: Searunner 40 Trimaran, Siruis 22 mono, 16 foot MFG daysailor
Posts: 515
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searunner views

Quarter Moon
I have owned a Searunner 40 for about ten years. They make wonderful cruising boats with a easy motion, good performance and plenty of storage space. They will heel 10-15 degrees with no problem. I like the center cockpit layout for a couple of reasons. It creates the large storage areas under the cockpit and this is where you carry the heavy stuff, low and in the center of the boat. With the mast also in the cockpit everthing is at hand for controling the boat and you seldom have to leave the safety of the cockpit in heavy weather. The layout of my boat has the galley, dinnette and nav station aft with the head, dressing room and bunks forward. I like having the bunks separate from the more active parts of the boat.
Do not be tempted to load up the amas with alot of heavy stuff. I know there is alot of space there, but there is plenty of space in the deep bilges and wing lockers. Put the bulky light stuff out there. I use mine to store stuff like oars and sailing rig for the dinghy, a couple of sails, sun awning, fenders, empty buckets and pails, and the deflated sportboat. Maybe 125-150 lbs per side. When you load up the amas it affects the ride and handling and can increase underwing pounding when driving the boat hard upwind. The Searunner 37 has a 2400 pound payload capacity.
Get a copy of The Searunner Constuction Manual and The Case for the Cruising Trimaran both by Jim Brown. They are out of print but I see them on Ebay now and then.
On the topic of centerboards, you can use a large diameter line to use to pull it down but have a second 1/8" line that holds it down. It will act as a fuse if you hit something. Fasten a piece of 1 1/2" sanitation hose to the forward end of the trunk to act as a bumper if the board comes up hard. Your boat is most likely already set up like this but if not do it.
If you have any specific questions feel free to ask.

Steve R
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Old 23-04-2006, 17:12   #3
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Location: Panama City Beach, Florida
Boat: Jim Brown, Searunner 37, Moon
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Searunner...

Thanks for the info. On the payload of 2400, (excuse the total cluelessness), does that include water, gas, electronics, diesel, electronics...if so we are leaving with just 2 cats and some litter...sigh. We carry our water in deep in the main hull, but our fuel is in the port wing, about 24 gallons. I wondered about that...We inherited a hard bottom dinghy and a 15 hp Yamaha. Nice dink for sure, but really heavy and awkward. Currently carried on rear of starboard ama and we've been blessed with fairly easy sails so far. Any ideas on that?!
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Old 24-04-2006, 00:29   #4
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Location: Minneapolis MN
Boat: Searunner 40 Trimaran, Siruis 22 mono, 16 foot MFG daysailor
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My understanding on the payload figure is that it includes water, fuel, food stores, clothing, tools and spare parts, personal effects, etc. The basic equipment required to operate the vessel would not be included in this. It can be a hard thing to pin down as we all have differant ideas on what to take with us. Some may have a larger battery bank, larger outboard motors, extra anchors and chain, maybe two tenders, etc. Try and keep the fully loaded waterline no higher than 5 inches above the bottom of the transom. I like to have the waterline on the amas a few inches below the ama transom. In reality I see many with the waterlines a bit higher and it is probably true that many trimarans are more heavily loaded than their designers intended.
It is okay to carry the tender on the wing. In the past I carried two tenders, a inflatable sportboat and a hard dink. Sportboat(when inflated) carried on the sterncastle and hard dink on the wing. When we leave for full time cruising I will take both again. Because you can vent the wing lockers and they are sealed off from the rest of the boat they are great for the messy, smelly stuff. I have five wing lockers, one each side fore and aft and one on the port side amidship. Aft on one side is the propane locker with 1-20lb and 1-10lb horizontal bottles and on the other side is storage for the barbaque grill with 1-10 lb bottle. The midship locker is for two 5 gallon fuel containers for diesel or gas and also a few gallons of motor oil. The battery bank was originally in this locker but has been moved below next to the centerboard trunk. Up forward one locker is for the secondary 35lb CQR and the other locker stores it's chain and nylon rode. The storm anchor and rode store under the floor in the berth area.
One thing I have always like about these boats is the incredible amount of storage space. You don't look like a gypsy caravan or a bunch of Okies headed west with stuff piled up on the cabintop or strapped along the rail.

Steve R
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Old 12-05-2006, 08:03   #5
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Thank you for the information.
I have been weighing everything! I'm currently looking for the information you recommended.
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Old 20-08-2008, 14:32   #6
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Location: Hampshire UK-Summers. Winters, cruising Caribbean
Boat: Searunner 40. Maxolar
Posts: 11
It is August 2008, so expect you have set off by now. My weight rule, Dont take anything you think you could do without. It is amazing how simple life can be.

Dave M
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