Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 15 votes, 4.60 average. Display Modes
Old 01-08-2008, 15:35   #106
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 18
Manawa
I have a question about the fatigue of the SS cables. The question is – do the cable itself suffers fatigue, or this fatigue occur only on its ends, I mean, on the points where the cable is attached to their terminal like turnbuckles & similars ? I believe that out of this points, per example, in the middle of the cable there is no fatigue. Can you or somebody else give me a clue on this matter ?.
__________________

__________________
Luis Sa Figueir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 16:22   #107
Senior Cruiser
 
Roy M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southwestern Yacht Club, San Diego, CA
Boat: Searunner 40 trimaran, WILDERNESS
Posts: 2,927
Images: 4
Look also at the spreader ends to check for fracture of the rigging wire. Run a rag up and down the entire cable to see if it snags on a broken wire.
__________________

__________________
Roy M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 17:10   #108
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
As promised, here are some more detailed shots of the trimaran trailer.
http://www.cruisersforum.com/gallery...imageuser=1390
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 17:41   #109
Registered User

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Hobart tasmania
Boat: Cross 38 trimaram
Posts: 18
hi luis,
The problems are primarily at any load or stress points. eg; swages, terminals, the spreaders, etc
Stainless steel wire is very strong but is subject to brittleness and breakage if worked at a fixed point hence the need for toggle fittings at both ends of the rigging. Also a saggy or slack leeward shroud can be an issue over time as it quietly flogs away.

Clean any staining off, get a magnifying glass, take your time, and have a reallly good look and feel.
__________________
manawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2008, 06:23   #110
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 18
Thank you Roy, thank you Manawa.
__________________
Luis Sa Figueir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2008, 16:24   #111
Registered User
 
Jmolan's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mexico/Alaska/Oregon
Boat: 34' Searunner Tri
Posts: 712
Scarfing wood boats

Luis....Bon Dia! ( I work with many Portugues fishing in Alaska) I have some photos of a repair I had to make to my Searunner. Although it is a plywood boat, the ideas are similar. My hull is 1/2" or 12mm thick. To make a repair as strong as the wood you have to "scarf" in a piece. you need to have the wood "overlapp" without making a patch show.....
The rule is: A scarf is 8 times as wide as the wood you are repairing. So in my example I have to take and taper or scarf the wood 4" wide. In the photo you can see you go from full thickness down to nothing over the 4". You then build a replacement piece with the same 4" wide scarf that will mate up to this scarf. This gives you a wide glue joint, and the wood will remain the same thickness. No bumps or ridges.
The best way I found to do this, is use a circular saw (power) and set the depth over four passes. Start at the top with 1/4 the depth, got to 1/2 the depth, the 3/4 the depth, then full depth. Then you use a grinder (the disk I show turned out to be best for me) Or planer or belt sander. With ply wood it is easy to see how much you remove as you can follow the plys down. The saw cuts give you the depth you need. Any dips will be filled by epoxy. It does not have to be perfect, just remove enough wood.
The wood work will take time but will less money to fix if it is not too big when compared to your rig. In Mexico (warm water, very salty) We use 10 years as a rule to replace the wire. We are starting to use synthetic line as a replacement. We have a racing cat in the Carribian waters right now and they are really happy with it. We can keep in touch. It would be WAY charper to ship as it is so light in weight....but you still have the darn import fees....:-)
The last shot is the bow all fixed, it was damaged on a frinds trailer when I was not present....what are friends for?
Look foward to reports on your boat adventure.

Jack
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP5503.JPG
Views:	357
Size:	250.9 KB
ID:	4553   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP5504.JPG
Views:	352
Size:	243.6 KB
ID:	4554  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP5505.JPG
Views:	382
Size:	250.1 KB
ID:	4555   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP5506.JPG
Views:	374
Size:	275.3 KB
ID:	4556  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP0797.JPG
Views:	359
Size:	252.8 KB
ID:	4557  
__________________
Jmolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2008, 16:28   #112
Registered User
 
Jmolan's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mexico/Alaska/Oregon
Boat: 34' Searunner Tri
Posts: 712
Rigging

This is the best site I know of forr rigging questions. They have a very good forum with many knowlegable people checking in. You can do a search and I am sure you will find a discussion that will answer a lot of your wire questions....:-)

SparTalk - SparTalk
__________________
Jmolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 08:02   #113
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 18

Dear friend Jack
Thank you for the “Bom Dia” and I wish the same to you. I did not know that there are many Portuguese fishermen in Alaska. I know that there is a lot of them in the Terra Nova (New found land) because of the cod fishing
Thank for your explanations about how to repair a wood boat. I am aware of this technique which is also used for fiber glass. My doubts are about cold mold. Everybody says that repairing cold mold is not easy. Personally I do not see why the technique mentioned by you cannot be used, maybe because the flexibility of cold mold panel is not compatible with the rigidity of a solid patch. Any way, as a last resource I will do exactly as you mentioned. This next Saturday 9th, I am going so see the boat. Only after that visit I will be able to have an idea of the situation. The “small”repairs needed to be done – as the present owner mentions in his advertisement – are not my biggest concern as far as cost is concerned (depending of its extension of course) what worries me is the rigging which can be very expensive even utilizing the synthetic ropes. Unfortunately we do not have them here in Brazil, and to import them the import duties are so high that might turn that possibility out of question. Once again thank you for your help. Luis
__________________
Luis Sa Figueir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 08:06   #114
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 18
Jmolan
Thank you for the site about rigging. Very good in deed.
Luis.
__________________
Luis Sa Figueir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 16:26   #115
Registered User

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Hobart tasmania
Boat: Cross 38 trimaram
Posts: 18
37 or 40

Hi, just a general question about size difference between the 37 and 40' searunners. Not the dimensions, but the usable feel when sailing and living aboard. [it's a vague openended qn. but,,,]
Also any thoughts on fitting an inboard to a 37' that currently only has an outboard? Saildrive, shaft n prop, hp???

cheers,
m.
__________________
manawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 17:46   #116
Senior Cruiser
 
Roy M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southwestern Yacht Club, San Diego, CA
Boat: Searunner 40 trimaran, WILDERNESS
Posts: 2,927
Images: 4
Manawa, the ONLY thing smaller about the 40 is the back of the sterncastle. Steve Rust can attest to the sailing difference - it's huge. It's not vague, it's powerful. It's the difference between a six cylinder and a V-8. And the storage capacity (payload) makes it possible to carry a RIB on the quarter deck without losing anything.

Install a Yanmar diesel. Period. Use a long 1" shaft with a folding prop (Gori?). You will NEVER regret it.
__________________
Roy M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 18:22   #117
Registered User

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Hobart tasmania
Boat: Cross 38 trimaram
Posts: 18
thanks Roy,
I didn't realise the larger sailplan we be so different.
With regard the motor I was thinking around 20hp. A friend suggested the yanmar with the sail drive. ??

m.
__________________
manawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2008, 00:07   #118
Senior Cruiser
 
Steve Rust's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Minneapolis MN
Boat: Searunner 40 Trimaran, Siruis 22 mono, 16 foot MFG daysailor
Posts: 515
Images: 82
Manawa
The forward cabins of the 40 are the same as the 37. The extra 3 feet is added between the aft companionway and the aft main bulkhead. On my boat this space is used for the galley, nav station , and a single bunk. This space has a more open and spacious feel than on a 37 and is about 6 feet long and 12 feet wide including the wing extension. I call it the big room. My boat has the short sterncastle so aft of the main bulkhead is the dinette. Some 40's have a longer sterncastle and have the dinette and galley located aft of the bulkhead just like in the 37. This leaves the big room for something else. The other arrangement has the main sleeping cabin in the stern and the galley and dinette in the big room. These are the three main interior options with the 40. You also have 1200 lbs more payload capacity with the 40. I have sailed on a few 37's and I think the 40 has a more powerful substantial feel to it and it just comes from being larger all around.
I have a small 17 hp diesel with a saildrive and it has proven to be just adequate. In light head winds or calms it will get me 6 knots at cruising rpm and 7 flat out. 20 hp for a 37 would probably be okay, 25 to 30 would be ideal. The issue with the saildrive will be location. It will have to be further aft than a conventional prop shaft. With the conventional installation the engine is either on one side of the centerboard trunk or directly behind the trunk at the base of the companionway. If you put a saildrive here the prop and possibly the drive itself may be lower than the keel. Not good IMO. In my boat the engine is under the dinette, but remember my dinette is shifted about 4 feet forward of the location in a 37. The bilge is deeper here but even so there is a hump in the floor under the table to accommodate the engine. The saildrive has proven to be reliable and trouble free so I have nothing bad to say about it. I think Roy has more experience with different engines and installations so he may have some good insight on this.

Galley to port with bunk, nav station, and eventual fridge to starboard. See the vertical beam between the painted and unpainted cabin side next to the bunk. This is where the main bulkhead would be in the 37 separating the sleeping area forward and the galley and dinette aft.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	3 galley.JPG
Views:	407
Size:	161.3 KB
ID:	4573   Click image for larger version

Name:	3 starboard interior.JPG
Views:	397
Size:	124.5 KB
ID:	4574  

__________________
Don't trust your dog to guard your lunch.

Patrick, age 9
Steve Rust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2008, 02:09   #119
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Waiheke Island
Boat: Searunner 37 Aroha
Posts: 333
Thumbs up Searunner

Hi Manawa
I have a 37ft Searunner on Waiheke Island NZ. I have just put a 30HP Yanmar in the centre of the boat. Its directly behind the centre board case centred in the boat. A box making the first step covers the motor and the stairs then going up to the cockpit. I reckon its the spot to put the motor because its so much more excessable. Central for weight and the shaft runs out central of the boat with the shaft then behind the mini keel creating less drag. I did look at sail drives but kind of backed off. More costs and they protrude further below the waterline than a shaft with prop. Also there is more mantainace I was told. I do believe that the 30HP Yanmar is the best option. New they are compact and light. In 50 knots of wind its nice to be able to motor forward. Tricky part is what kind of prop to have. I am looking at a 3 bladed folding. 16inch Gori.. Its a quess but hoping it will work well doing 2000 RPM. Full throttle you should still reach optiman rev's at 3600.

There is a 43 foot Searunner on Waiheke. Its huge and the rig looks so powerful. I must admit the 40 would be a superior boat in every way except docking in a mariner. Not that I go into mariners.
Bigger does mean more cost. I feel lucky and happy to have a 37.

These Searunners are clever boats. If you can get one with little or no rot then its a better base to start cause there is so much you can ad.
__________________
rossad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2008, 07:33   #120
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 18
Rossad
Can you give us an ideia of the cruising speed/RPM/Diesehour of the 30HP.
Thank you
Luis
__________________

__________________
Luis Sa Figueir is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
paracelle, Searunner, trimaran

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bahia 46: Now Proud Owners - FP Bahia 46 'Maestro' Kiwikat Fountaine Pajot 24 09-11-2011 21:30
moorings owners program jvrkmarina The Sailor's Confessional 2 06-07-2011 07:45
Searunner 31 Spreaders Siskiyous Multihull Sailboats 0 05-07-2011 17:46
For Sale: 1975 Searunner Trimaran scotiasailor Classifieds Archive 0 02-07-2011 14:03


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:39.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.