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Old 22-10-2010, 09:03   #646
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Hey friends....sorry for my long silence.I just landed in Oregon after a two month gig in the Arctic Ocean. I fished my regular assignment, then jumpped over to this rig. It is a converted 115' King Crab vessel. It has been converted to a yacht/research vessel. We had 5 to 18 scientists onboard, and we got as far up as 72 degrees north. That is 350 miiles above the Arctic Circle. Made it around the top of Barrow and over the the Canadian border. Very interesting work. Running the boat is a breeze, except I have a lot to learn about ice movement. The lee shore up there is 500 miles long, and it is the ice that bears down on you, not the wind...:-)
I will be around. I leave for Mexico and my little 34' in a few days. Ahhhhh.
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Old 22-10-2010, 11:55   #647
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Originally Posted by Dwaine View Post
He is asking between 1,000-1,500. This is why I thought it may be worth it. It was said to be a searunner 31. I wonder if it is even 31, because most piver 31's I have looked at online look a little different. But after looking at Pivers it does look more like a Piver than a Searunner.


Thanks for the speedy replies guys. Any other comments welcome.

Dwaine
Hilarious. You have to give the guy credit for his nerve.

I heartily second JMOLAN's advice. Come home and go sailing. On anything. On everything. Puget Sound is a great sailing ground year 'round esp. the upper reaches of it and there are many clubs and races and regattas and so forth. The Northwest Multihull Association was pretty active when I lived up there and would be a place to look for a ride or a buy on a multihull. As to the structure of these boats, I'd say borrow or buy a copy of the Gougeon Bros. book on epoxy construction. You'll learn what to look for in wood/epoxy composite construction, if that's the type of boat you've settled on (not the worst choice by far). And, of course, there is the Internet. More text than you can digest and some of it is even useful and accurate and informed by reality. But you have to get the education yourself in order to tell the difference between compost and mere crap. I recommend a close reading of JMOLAN, Mark Johnson's, and drew23's posts to this forum, esp. as Mark's account of his project just staggers me. Biblical.

As for buying a boat, all I can tell you is to be patient and very, very hard-nosed about it. It helps immensely if you have a sane partner, as in infected by neither the boat insanity or a general tendency to follow the wild hare (hair?) wherever it may lead. I was hell-bent on building a Constant Camber boat. Had the tools, the skills, the room and the money. Absolutely poised on the edge. My wife somehow cajoled (tequila?) me into promising to give a year to a thorough search for an existing boat before we committed. Being the reasonable person that I am and knowing that the boat I wanted was pretty rare, I caved. I looked and looked while I also researched temp. boat sheds and how to get the gloriously finished vessel from the yard to the water. As god is my witness (or not), just a week before my drop-dead date, I found THE ONE. Great boat, pro built, priced well less than the materials in her, and on the correct coast. The other guy paid for the divorce, not me. The downside, of course, is that I will NEVER live down the fact that SHE WAS RIGHT. There, I said it.

So hang in there, educate yourself, have cash in your hand and the world will turn in your direction.
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Old 22-10-2010, 16:10   #648
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Welcom back Jack! What an adventurous life you live. And they pay you to have all that fun!

I'm going to give the Dux rigging a try on my runners for starters. (a perfect application). They come in soon. I wish we knew what the "ultimate" lifespan of this stuff really is. With metal rigging and correctly installed Sta Locs, I have observed that given constant vigilance, IF it is not a constant tropical sailing, acid rain, hard use situation, the typical thing of "use it untill it gets obvious corrosion or a meat hook", even over 20 years, is relatively safe. Not as safe as changing it out earlier, but 99.9% of us get away with it.

With Dux, It could be that only the outer layers get weaker from UVs, but being twice as strong from the get go, you could also get away with it as well. (accepting that it's likewise, not as strong as it used to be), We just don't know yet. What is the longest lifespan in any comercial application that you know of?

If one opts for the "jacket", Is this something that Colligo does? What about around the terminator?

Keep us informed about your rig... Staying tuned, getting fuzz, etc.? It is exciting stuff!
Enjoy your Searunning on the Sea Of Cortez, Mark
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Old 22-10-2010, 22:16   #649
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Mark, so glad to hear about your trying out Dux. You will not regret it. I really do not have the time right now (I am packing to drive 2k miles to Mexico) But I am sure you will love it. The only way we were able to switch over the entire 125' Trawler from wire to Dux, is that it lasts so much longer. At least 3 to 1 over wire rope. Of course it is different applications I know, and no UV exposure....buut in high wear, high loading usage, dragging it over rusty decks with big loads, subjecting it to repeated abuse....it last way longer than wire. Hard to believe, but that is one reason we switched to Dux. It made economic sense.
I will write more in a week or so...you will love it (did I already say that?)
Here are a couple pics I found of my last ride. see ya!
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Old 23-10-2010, 07:09   #650
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I look forward to it Jack.

Cool pics! Looks like one of those places where the ice cliff "calveing" at that moment, could've cause a mini Tsunami, and more than just "an embarassing situation" for the vessel!

I also tried a different kind of "trimaraning" this summer. This is me doing over 35 knots on the beach where "Chariots Of Fire" was shot, in St Andrews Scottland...
It's all good! Mark
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Old 23-10-2010, 19:31   #651
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Hey, Jack. Good to see your posts again on the forum! Doreen and I will be in SoCal in about two weeks. We are in eastern WA celebrating my mother's 86th birthday today along with family from this area.

Mark, I still have a little Manta Landsailor that I have sailed on some dry lake beds in the deserts of SoCal. I hope to get back on it again one of these days. Sure is big speed compared to a Searunner, and just as fun too.

The rudder is coming along, and I did the first glass work on it recently with Dave W before he headed to Antarctica. He brought me a burgee from the Ross Island Yacht Club. I will have to get a picture of it on here

All the best from Washington,

Rann
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Old 24-10-2010, 23:58   #652
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Dwaine -
You are welcome to come sailing with me in Olympia when you're next in the area. I have a Searunner 25 in the water and a 31 in refit (full disclosure: my 25 is for sale). Happy to share refit experience too.
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Old 25-10-2010, 09:03   #653
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Originally Posted by md7a View Post
Dwaine -
You are welcome to come sailing with me in Olympia when you're next in the area. I have a Searunner 25 in the water and a 31 in refit (full disclosure: my 25 is for sale). Happy to share refit experience too.
That is so cool! I was just scratching my noggin' about your boat for sale and am stoked to see your offer!

http://seattle.craigslist.org/oly/boa/2023949365.htm

I was just going to post your boat to show what a better deal your boat was. I have never seen your boat. But it is a great example of what we have been talking about.
How we can get into trouble looking for a cheap boat. I wanted to show how buying a 6k boat is cheaper than buying a 1.5k boat. (I like your design better too!) Assuming your boat is sound and would be able sail from day one. I know it will need all the usual maintenance that any boat requires (not repairs or rebuilds)
The other boat you will spend two years and well over 6k in yard rental fees, materials, labors, etc. and still have not got a good boat to sail!
I guess there is nothing wrong with building/rebuilding boats if that si what you want to do. But if you want to go sailing, that is far different from rebuilding an old clunker of a tri...:-)

I am currently in the middle of my road trip to Mexico. Just hit a new personal best on MPG. Went 707 miles on one tank, 46.5 MPG. So now I can join the 700 club (A very loose group on TDI nutz, much like here)Next leg I go 5 MPH slower and see how much improvement I get. VW Jetta TDI...:-)
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Old 26-10-2010, 20:23   #654
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Question Dux runners & deck lamps

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
I'm going to give the Dux rigging a try on my runners for starters. (a perfect application).

If one opts for the "jacket", Is this something that Colligo does? What about around the terminator?
I've just learned that I will have to replace all the wire on my 31' before launching. I'm intrigued with Dux, but the rigger I'm working with recommends a conservative approach. I'm thinking of following your lead on Dux running backstays, however, and would be interested to hear where you are buying your runners and in what form.

I would also be interested to hear whether forum members like their mast-mounted or spreader-mounted deck lights. I will also have to replace my spreaders due to rot, possibly related to the light mountings. Do you actually use these things?

Interestingly, the '25 has had no wire problems, no spreader rot (aluminum) and no deck lights, and I haven't missed any of them.
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Old 27-10-2010, 07:21   #655
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Hi Will,
My Dux runners just came in from Colligo Marine and they look great! (480-703-3675) John franta did the splices himself, and I am glad that for "getting my feet wet" I got him to do the splices. On my own boat as well as in my business, I have done hundreds of splices, but not this one. With my runners, I understand the terminator is spliced in, then the runner is PRE-stretched, before the second terminator is spliced in. Doing this with accuracy in length & match up, as well as neet strong splices, is an acquired skill. (I plan to acquire it in the future.)

Although I have been a consultant in many areas of building / repairing & equipping a boat for the cruising life, these rig decisions are out of my specialty. I have been seeking as much advise as I could lately, and by far the best has come from Steven Mann (Pacific Offshore Riggers).

What I am currently leaning toward at present is this: Stick with 316 grade 1X19 wire on all 4 my uppers, but switch to "Dyform". Next to rod, Dyform has the least stretch, and this stretch has always been a problem on my SR 34's tall rig. (only on the upper 1/3rd of the mast) I was going to use wire in my roller furler & as a radio antennae backstay anyway...

For all of my others, I may go either way... standard 1X19 or Dux. I would however loose my additional lightning ground if I go with Dux. (I have all of my inner chainplates grounded to the keel's copper plate.)

In NC where we live, with an occasional cruise to the tropics, I am confident now that the Dux will last as long as wire. (I hope 15 years) And, I doubt that the terminator would be in great shape beyond that point, so would not opt for the "jacket" version at twice the price. (overkill) For full time life in the tropics... I suspect that well maintained 316 wire will last longer, but I don't know that.

The extra windage of Dux does not seem to be as much of a minus as the lighter weight is a plus.

The extra strength of oversized Dux to reduce creep, is good for "still being safe" after a 20% loss over the years, but since we would use our orrigional turnbuckles / pins / & chainplates, this extra strength is otherwise a moot point.

On our boat, we have chosen to have a taller rig with radar and a radar reflector & small TV antennae. We have a windlass on the bow and a 110 W solar panel hanging off of the stern. All of the things that have made Delphys a fully equipped, energy self sufficient, safe, comfortable, full time cruiser... have made her slower and with more motion than she would,ve been. Saving weight on the rigging is a bit "too little too late" for us on that front. (unless we also went with a carbon mast) Everything is a trade off.

We STILL may go for Dux on the lower 2/3rds of our rig, as every little bit helps. (still thinking about it) For sure, using it on ones runners & perhaps the removable staysail stay as well, seems a great application for Dux. Being so light it will not flop around as much when they are not "made up tight". John Franta says that bronze piston hanks are probably OK as well. If I use them on a staysail stay however, I would polish out the interior surfaces of the piston hanks.

On your boat, if it is not already festooned with "stuff", and you sail her light, the light weight rigging would be really nice... Especially if you "daysail empty" more than "cruise loaded". If your mast is not skinny, tall, & flexy, you may be a candidate. It does seem to be the wave of the future, (and of coarse, the way back past).

About spreader lights... If you are never out at night, no need. Otherwise, if you cruise at night, or anchor out, when doing deck work of any kind, they are REALLY useful. MUCH better than a strap on headlight! We use our deck light's all the time.

Regards, Mark
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Old 30-10-2010, 14:44   #656
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Trimarans can do more than just sail fast

Good evening,

Another thing I like about trimarans. Get the board up and you can do this.

Exiting the river after taking the boat to my front garden for it's anual overhaul. Depth over the bar a mere 1.1 meters. (neap tide!) Then punch through the surf and back to the harbour on the other side of the bay. Haulout charges nill.

Kromme River, St Francis Bay, east coast of South Africa.
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Old 01-11-2010, 17:11   #657
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I Have My Dux Runners all rigged up. I like them! They "feel" better than wire. Frst, I noticed that the throat of the splice was more flexable than the rest of the line & seemed a bit vulnerable when being moved around or loose, so I whipped & wrapped the throat of the splice. (no stitches on the whipping, & I used "non stickey" rubberized tape) This tape will get refurbished avery few years. I ran this by John Franta first to make sure it was not a bad idea. He said it is more of a "personal preference" thing. It is important not to whip up past the beginning of the splice...

To issolate the aluminum "terminator" from my mast's SS tangs, I made some 1/16" thick tefflon washers, and lots of TefGel on the pin & hole.

As always, my running backs can be removed or rigged up in about 45 seconds, and the turnbuckles' handles make it quick AND easy to determine when one side is the same as the other. I just hook em up, and put 8 turns on each one.

When being stored in the forward possition, I secure them with a 4/1 block & tackle with bunji chord instead of rope. This way the mast can lean a bit, and the small (storage only) blocks, will not blow up from overload. (It's happened) I could not have used bunji with wire runners, because the extra weight would require more tension than bunji chord could provide to not flop around.

Finally I secure the loose end of the turnbuckle to a stantion with another bunji. It is a great system. Mark
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Old 01-11-2010, 17:58   #658
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Something else that just got replaced was my boats BALLS. It has 7 of them. Tennis balls! This goes back 30 years, and you "old timers" know this, but I seem to have the only boat around here that uses them these days. It is to make "stand up" or "stand off" blocks. The problem with the factory spring loaded jobs, is that the small shackle is not very strong, and NOT meant for a totally side load.

With my "tennis ball" version, I use 2-1/4" Schaefer 2,700 lb WL blocks, with matching shackles, and they can take full load from any angle. The tennis balls keep them from flopping on the deck (outboard sheet leads), or the ama bows (spinaker blocks)... Or the front of the mast (staysail halyard block). NO DECK DAMAGE, NO RATTLES, NO CLUNKS! And they last several years. After that, $6 replaces them all!

You just cut 1 -1/8" holes on opposite sides of the ball with a hole saw or strong snippers. Then you put the shackle on its pad eye base, or stantion base bale, & pin it. Now stick the shackle in the ball. Next reach in the ball with vice grips, grab the pin, and push HARD on the ball to colapse it almost FLAT. You may have to use other tools to help, or prise the shackles pin out the other side. (After that you're home free). Now use vice grips to keep the ball flat, remove the pin, locktite the threads, and pin on the block.

After the block is shackled securely, pop the shackle & pin back into the inside of the now round ball. There you have it... The ultimate stand up / stand off block!

I wish I could claim this one, but it was not mine. It surely belongs in the "boat solutions hall of fame".

Keep Searunning, Mark
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Old 07-11-2010, 20:49   #659
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Will,

I will be home in the winter, and always enjoy passing threw Oly. I was a Greener not to long ago. I would love to come see your boat and talk to you about it. If your taking it out in the winter, then I would love to come along.

I will send you a message in a couple of months.

Thanks for the offer,

Dwaine
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Old 10-11-2010, 23:02   #660
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SR 34 and TDI MPG

Finally getting close to a deal on a Searunner 34 which has the aft cabin setup like the 37 but with single bunks outboard of the galley. Perfect for the kids. Needs a bit of work, but hope to be off in about 18 months time from New Zealand towards Tonga and Fiji.

I had a 2000 Jetta TDI auto as well as a 1998 bettle TDI manual and 1997 Jetta manual. Also had a 1986 golf NA diesel. On the 2000 you could "burp" the tank and get about another gallon or so in when filling. There is a little black plastic piece inside the filler neck about an inch in. When you fill it up after she's full press the piece down with the filler hose for about 10 seconds or so. Will hear the air exchange if it's working. Been a few years, but will clear some airspace or something and the level in the neck will drop a bunch. May need to do a few times to get max fill.

Cheers,
Jeff
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