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Old 25-04-2010, 21:28   #571
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Jeff,
I wasn't aware there are two or more for sale. This is the one I referred to:
34' Searunner Trimaran
Rann
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Old 26-04-2010, 08:45   #572
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boatguy30 View Post
Not much happening on the forum lately.......

For those interested SR40 Maxolar did sell to a Frenchman that makes his home in Tahiti. He supposedly has plans to sail the boat to Tahiti and departed Miami for the Bahamas the day of sale. Hope he has a lot of patch kits and duck tape! And does a serious refit somewhere in the Caribbean.

Also there is a SR 34 on Ebay. I was on this boat last month. It APPEARS to be quite nice, but the exact origin/type of plywood is unknown. He has sent me some cutout pieces for boil testing. I actually bought another boat last week, but still plan to test the plywood and post the results here for anyone interested. I'd be happy to share any other observations about that particular boat via PM.


Cheers,
Jeff
Hi Jeff,

Tahiti? He's a braver man than me.

I'd certainly be interested in those results - still looking

Cheers
Cliff
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Old 31-05-2010, 06:57   #573
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This is a neet little story by Jim Brown, off of YouTube:
:

Roy, Do you have that Center Board operational yet? How's it work?
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Old 31-05-2010, 10:21   #574
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Mark, I hope to haulout later this next month, when I'll install the board. In the meantime, I'm working to make some money, to reassemble the engine (preventive maintenance on the starter, etc.). Then I'm going to pull the stick for overhaul, painting and radar installation. THEN, I get to go sailing. I'll post some pics of the installation when I get started on it.
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Old 31-05-2010, 11:03   #575
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Roy, your plan sounds good. Still lots to do based on your board, stick, engine, etc. The "...then go sailing..." is the best part of all!

Looking forward to those pics when you get them uploaded.

Fairwinds,

Rann
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Old 03-06-2010, 01:41   #576
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NEW 35' TRIMARAN FOR SALE

I found this add while cruising the craigslist want adds. It led me to this site.

DESIGNER/BUILDER - MARPLES 35'*CC35A*TRIMARAN

I would say it is worth reading for all of us, but should be required reading for anyone considering building a boat.

As for me, I only had a short period of time to be in Mexico ( I depart for AK. in the morning) So I never launched Corazon. I would have to say though, the design once again came through in flying colors. We had a tropical storm here last Sept. that dumped 30 inches in 24 hours. The roads and homes were destroyed in many places. Many of the boats in storage got a a lot of water inside. I spoke to one guy who had a 50' 750k boat. He found it with 18" of water and the floor and bottom cabinets ruined.
The little Searunner had all the vents open in the wings and ama's. The cockpit drained like it does so well. I had NO WATER inside, or what little came in was evaporated by the time I got there. The combination of dry and vented makes all the difference. The boats that got soaked also have all the vents shut...they turned into mold farms. Just ugly.
We did use the Hobie Power Skiff a lot. instant fun, just push the throttle!

I tried to post a few shots but could not. I will try later.
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Old 04-06-2010, 15:25   #577
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Jack,
Good to hear that your boat made it through that monsoon, DRY! You must have done everything right. Searunners have SO many openings. We only got water in Delphys a few times over the last 14 years. There was the time we were beating hard to weather, really fast, into square waves & 40 knts of wind... Our Beckson mushroom vents on the cabin top leak like a sieve when they go under a wave that poops the entire boat! (WAY over the top of the dodger) Funny thing... This never happens if I FALL OFF in a gale. "Learn slow, remember long".
Then there was the time our PSS shaft seal, had it's rotor slide up the shaft, letting in a LOT of water. Both a Monomaran, And a catamaran would've been in big trouble. We caught it just before the engine got water in it. Having a dusty dry bilge, (normally), our bilge pumps had no automatic function at the time. Since then, we put a doughnut zinc on the shaft, inside the boat, just on the forward side of the rotor. This makes it impossable for the rotor to slip forward again. We also added float switches to the bilge pumps. Then, seperate first alert bilge water alarms, to both cabins & the amas.
Then there was the time that we were away in one of those huge rains, & our SS cover Nicro 24 hr Mushroom vent, let water past the openings & into the fan, which slung it everywhere. With 4 of these on the boat, and after several replacements, I found that the factory just doesn't seal them well. I took the last batch apart, & silicone caulked the cover to the guts, all cracks & openings except the bottom weep holes, and also caulked the wire openings. (really thoroughly) Then used silicone plumbers grease on the battery compartment "O rings", and the plastic cylinder that slides into the deck trim ring. Other than change the "Radio Shack" batteries... It's been 10 years on these 4, with no problems & no leaks. (on really dificult electrical connections like this, I use "Jet Lube" copper powder loaded, "electrically conductive" grease) It keeps the moisture out of the connection, while maxamizing conductivity. Great for house Battery cabels too! On battery cables, When I follow the connect up with solvent washing off the excess "jet lube", then paint with 5 coats of "Liquid Lectric Tape", the connection is perfect, & 100% waterproof for the life of the batteries. (10 years?) I have removed old connections like this many years later, & found the battery post as shiney as day one. In fact, having made an electrically complex boat, (forgive me Jim & John), I have found that by making all connections crimped & soldered & heat shrunk, then connected with this level of care, and the wire fastened every 4" or so... only the batteries, or the device on the other end can fail. It makes it easy to figure out when they crap out. By having mechanical redundancy, and not relying on these things too much... Well, "so far so good".
I checked out that info about the above CC35 project. Really nice job! I love my SR 34, and having more room & storage, it is the better boat for us. Before I knew that however, I almost went with the CC35. For a "couple" who want to cruise for months on end, rather than years, this is the perfect cruising trimaran! And, to my eye, one of the most asthetically pleasing boats ever designed.
Some thoughts on boat projects in general that I can pass along... The boat needs to be kept out of the sun, not just the rain. If it's in a building, it needs to have a roof & walls that are at least 50% opaque. This varies with the time exposed. Was it 3 months or 5 years? UV damaded epoxy looks like it. It is more yellow, no longer clear, and when rapped with a round piece of wood just hard enough to dent the surface of the plywood, it doesn't crack. (lots of luck getting permission to do that!) To prevent condensation from dripping from the ceiling of your boat building, when it's cold & damp out, completely seal the floor with 6 mil poly. The ground is where most of that moisture comes from. Also... UV is an ongoing problem. For this reason it is best to use opaque "Grey" primer under a White LP paint job. (with no bare spots) This blocks 100% of the sun rather than 50%, like White primer under white paint does. It makes the boat's interrior much cooler in the tropics too. (I did experiments on comparative samples) This concept also applies to protective canvas. Green or dark Blue Sunbrella, block MUCH more of the UVs than Toast, Beige, or White. Color choice can double the life of your sails!
One important thing to apply in boat projects, is stick within the concept of the design, or call for a designer consultation about the changes you have in mind. (This is regarding the things that change the stresses, weight, safety factors, or balance of the sailplan.) When we started our project, I had just recently been out on a guys SR 34, that had a Gougeon Bros Wing mast. The boat went from headsail driven to mainsail driven. The Mast was way forward of the designed location. (not where the strength & stiffness is) It had a loose triangular rig that flopped around at anchor, and the wing mast did not self feather. It wanted to sail at anchor, & in a hurricane... Anyway, the boat actually was beautiful, & sailed great. It just wasn't a better cruising boat! I talked to John Marples about a more perfected version of this, with a smaller wing, on our project. After he explained all of the reasoning why it was a bad idea, it all made sense to me. He sugested a Taller version of our standard SR34 rig, rigged as a cutter, but sailed as a sloop. I drew it to scale & sent it to him to double check everything. (like spreader location, etc.) The boat & rig are designed together to compliment each other. Our helm is perfectly balanced at all times. In the case of the CC35 project for sale, it could be that these folks did this change along with John? OR, perhaps they had sailed on a CC35 that was Mainsail driven, with the same ball & socket pivoting mast. With a large roach main, I assume the mast is in a different location to balance the sail plan?
Anyway, if it balances perfectly, it may be an improvement, but if not, the rudder drag would eat up any advantages from a slicker rig. That rig is great on a beach cat... IF they really did their homework on this, it looks like they really put in the love, & care, & expertiese, to make something special. It may be 2 years & $20,00 from a complete sail away cruising home, but it sure looks like it was built well. If John surveys the boat, & passes these issues, their asking price of $50,000 is not an unreasonable amount of money. It is hard to describe how much work this really is... My hat's off to them.
BTW... The way to test for good glue joints on a project boat, is to chip off an epoxy goober or run out of a stringer or frame glue joint, in about a dozen concealed locations. The glue goober should come off with a thin piece of wood still attached, NOT clean. This tells if the connecting surfaces were prepped properly before glue up... There I go, rattling on about boat projects again. Hope this is of use to some one. Mark
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Old 06-06-2010, 08:26   #578
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Roy,
With your upcoming mast refurbishing project, you may be just the guy to answer a question for me. I assume Your mast is painted? With your boat being 30+ years old, I bet that this is not your first time for this? My rig is a year or two from needing to be repainted & new rigging. It is painted with AwlGrip, & the paint is 95% intact, but chalking badly. It is covered with scratches, chips, & dings. It is only "failing" on the welded on parts like the gooseneck, masthead, base, winch bases, & boom ends. I know that the "proper" way to paint it is to 100% strip the paint everywhere & start over. The thing is, I don't care about the ultimate cosmetic perfection of the paint job, don't want to go to the trouble, and don't want to loose even 1% of the aluminum mast in the process. (it is a spagetti stick already) What I'd like to do is remove the stuff in the way, strip the failing paint & bare spots only, and only fine sand the rest of the mast (95% of the surface area), to remove just the surface, & get a bond. The thing is... the first step in repainting is Alumaprep, & Alodine wash. (to etch the surface of bare aluminum) If I spot treat the bare areas that need it this way, I must overlap the "prepped paint only" parts of the mast. Then I would prime & paint the entire mast. I know that the first couple of shiney years, the different levels of paint at these repairs can be seen, but being a mast, I don't think it matters. I do wonder however, how Alodine sticks to AwlGrip (VS bare aluminum), and how AwlGrip will stick to itself, with (in small areas) a layer of Alodine in between? Would this be a mistake? Nothing Like: "been there done that" Mark
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Old 18-06-2010, 20:41   #579
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i picked up a book today at the local salvage place because i thought someone here might be interested...

"Searunner Trimarans" by Jim Brown, copyright 1973

the book is in excellent shape with lots of info pertaining to these boats...
if you want it make me an offer that will cover shipping and its yours...
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Old 19-06-2010, 05:05   #580
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Jim's Searunner book

Quote:
Originally Posted by pressuredrop View Post
i picked up a book today at the local salvage place because i thought someone here might be interested...

"Searunner Trimarans" by Jim Brown, copyright 1973

the book is in excellent shape with lots of info pertaining to these boats...
if you want it make me an offer that will cover shipping and its yours...
I am interested in purchasing your copy. Please contact me if it is still available, Scott
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Old 19-06-2010, 10:23   #581
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Howdy,

Hey Pressuredrop. I sent you a PM last night. Do you still have the book?

Thanks

Dave
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Old 19-06-2010, 10:33   #582
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Mark, Sorry to not have gotten back to you (I thought I had, but my brain is leaking, apparently). I'm working way too much to get some bucks together for my haulout. The short answer to your question is, YES, you can spot treat with Alodine, epoxy primer, then repaint. I have decided to just bite the bullet and completely chemically strip my mast, after drilling the new holes, fillig the old holes, etc. Then I will put a uniform base coat followed by linear polyurethane, Sterling, in my case, because that's what I have gallons of. I'll take pictures of all of this and send them, when it happens. Right now, I'm reinstalling the starter motor (had it stripped, serviced for the hell of it), changing the start/high draw battery bank (I eliminated it when I created my new monster house bank), and finishing last-minute touches on the new centerboard. I hope this helps.
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Old 21-06-2010, 11:42   #583
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I don't remember if this has already been posted here or not:

Good news: the re-issue of Jim Brown's book 'The Case For The Cruising Trimaran' is now available for sale on the outrig.org website AS A PDF DOWNLOAD for $15.

Bad news: the PDF is protected with a password, so it won't (easily) load onto an eBook reader.

I purchased a copy. I'm now reading the introduction while sitting in a marina atm awaiting my first-ever haulout this afternoon... wish me luck!

EDIT: the book is here:
http://smalltrimarans.com/book/cruising-trimaran.html
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Old 24-06-2010, 17:38   #584
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Roy, Thanks for the advise. It is good to know that spot treating with Alodine & priming will work. After decades of striving for a really TOO high level of cosmetics, I am looking for shortcuts. Only stripping what is failing or scratched off, when I redo my mast, is one of them. I may do the boom first... (next winter), because it needs it most, and can be removed easily. At the same time I have an interesting mod in mind. We seldom use the boom as I should, (for using a block & tackle to lower our 8 HP motor to the dinghy.) It works great to do this, but with 2" between the boom & bimini, we have to tie up the main sl really close, to keep it off of the bimini. This makes it where it chafes the flaked sail, to move the boom out, because the main is tied tightly around the boom. The main sheet, just under the boom, is the problem. Now that I see the writing on the wall, for manually handling this OB motor, I HAVE to solve this. So I plan to use split PVC pipe as a mold, and make a fiberglass tunnel under the boom for the main sheet to run through. Then it will work, even inside a tight wad of sail, sail ties, & reefing lines... inside an even tighter mainsail cover! If I can swing the boom out, without uncovering & un tieing the main, I will use it as a hoist. At least that's the plan. When you describe all of the changes to your boat over the years... It sounds like the hull alone is original! Is every system & removable part, second generation? We have replaced most of the electronics at the end of the wire, more from obsolesce than failure. Oh well, gives us something to do. Mark
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Old 25-06-2010, 09:41   #585
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Mark, There is a very interesting modification that I am going to use for my boom. I just finished the last stages of it on a customer's boat. I'll take some pictures this weekend and post them. Basically, it's a "basket" of lightweight aluminum support tubing, that also doubles as a super handrail when working near the boom. The sail cover is secured to the tubing, with the cover zipped along the top with a long line. The lazy jacks secure to the tubes, which flare outward and upward from the boom. It looks very cool, as you will see in the photos, and keeps the entire sail well flaked and above the boom. Then, as I will probably do, one can simply install two sheaves, one at the forward and one at the after end of the boom where the mainsheet can travel. It's harder to describe than photograph, so have patience with me.

I built my boat over thirty years ago. Because it was the first Brown in Southern California to be completely sealed in West System, it has held up very well. Everything else, non-structural, has pretty much been changed as new materials came to market. At the moment, my interior is almost completely gutted as I sand and repaint everything, including the underdeck above the headliner. It's been hard, but it is completely going to transform the interior. All of the electrical has been completely replaced using L16 batteries as the house bank, a Magnum inverter charger, custom electrical panel, and a distributed 12 volt electrical system in five major conduits from the locker above the new Yanmar 3GM30. I installed a Lewmar windlass on the bow, with pressure water for the saltwater washdown and remote windlass controls at the bow, cockpit, and even in the bilge so I can pull the 1/4" high-test chain through a chase into the bilge aft of the forward mainstrength bulkhead, when I want to seriously trim the boat for long passages. The electrical system was organized on Excel, so if you want a copy I can send it to you. All wires are coded at their terminal ends so I can identify them when doing changes or maintenance.

After I get the mast pulled this summer (after the haulout next month and new centerboard installed) I will pull out the floorboards and replace them with the prototype I used in the galley: 1 X 2 hollow rectangular aluminum tube stringers, drilled out with large, aircraft style, "lightening holes", and 1/2" high density foam soles with sand nonskid. I figure I'll save well over a hundred pounds with that changeover. The old plywood boards are getting pretty funky after so many years of abuse.

Since I ripped out so much stuff, I took out the entire plumbing system (with the exception of the toilet and waste tank) for replacement. All of it was showing its age, and the materials today are too cool to be ignored. I have planned for a watermaker, so this pushed the entire plumbing project to reflect new uses and sources of freshwater. And, for the first time, I'll be including a pressure water system, and possibly a small water heater, to meet my pleasure craving needs as I age with the boat.

I have most of the parts for the new reefer/freezer which will fit under the sterncastle table. And my wiring for the solar panels will go in right after that. I'm going to be using high output panels with an MPPT charge controller to keep the ice cubes cold.

Right now, however, all is chaos, with the exception of the forward cabin bunk, where I can sleep. But it seems to be coming together. I have promised Jeff and Josie to meet them, next year, somewhere in the Pacific. One must have goals and deadlines, I suppose.
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