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Old 11-02-2010, 05:33   #511
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Thanks Roy. Yep, that's J&J. We were back & fourth to "boat dinners", from Anapolis to Trinidad. Jeff used to get that funny grin every time he would squeeze into the settee. (remembering his old 40"er) There is nothing like a Searunner sterncastle! I hope Jeff will contribute his "sea stories" to Jim Brown's OUTRIG project. I plan to... Jeff has this story about being at the wheel for DAYS, surfing HUGE waves (>50'?), in the Bay Of Biscay. Now, there is their more recent, hitting a whale, or getting caught in a hurricane off of Costa Rica. Really scarey stuff!
Hey guys... Check THIS out! These shots are Stravaig... their SELF built cat. Now sold & they are on a Cross (42?), also Stravaig, & under renovation.
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Old 11-02-2010, 07:36   #512
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Drew, Good luck with that big haulout. If the CB trunk is rotten in a big way, give yourself a LOT of time & replace ALL the bad stuff. Keep it dry! Heaters? If it is limited in size, & only one lam deep, you can prep the area down to "0" shiney spots on the epoxy, with 80 grit, and take the ply down to clean wood. Then dry the ply area for say... 10 days, with frequent brushing on of acetone, to draw out the moisture. Then fill with silica... perhaps with fine glass fiber on the first, lower application? Then RE glass the repair with at least one layer of 10 oz, or two of 6 oz. FILL the weave of the fabric with three coats of epoxy, RIGHT after the cloth is stable & firming up. Sand the next day to level the surface & feather the edges. Don't sand away the glass over the repair! Then 3 or 4 more coats the next day, and sand again the next day. You will remove most of these top coats. The idea is to have no glass fiber showing. The sanding in there can't be done with a power sander. If it is beyond reach, you will have a real problem. After you DO get it prepped & filled, you could go on the new surface with glass, & right away cover with PEEL PLY, (squeege it flat), to make the feathering of the edges unnecessary, & possibly some sanding. (WE SHOULD ALL HAVE: "THE GOUGEON BROTHERS ON BOAT CONSTRUCTION") You can sand near the top or bottom with a hand block, but further down, requires the "butter churn" sanding device, pictured on the previous page. The pad is a 5" DA. soft, peel & stick pad. It is mounted to a block with a hinged 4' handle. The back side of the block is mounted with two strong spring loaded rollers, that move on about 3/8" long slide slots. These were either roller casters or cabinet catches... I forget. (Lowes or Home Depot) The whole device starts sanding from the moment you FORCE it into the trunk, so sanding ONLY the middle would require a slick sheet of something over the pad, untill it is in possition. This pad will be under perhaps 30 or 40 lbs of sanding pressure! EASILY 10X what you can apply by hand. It's not fun!
Mark
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Old 11-02-2010, 08:28   #513
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The Saga continues:
Now, to "The Ups & Downs of Centerboards". This gets into other INCREDIBLY time consuming brushes with "life on Earth". First off, the copper loaded, slick, & shiney as a penny, gell coat permanent bottom job, that cost a fortune, & took a MONTH to apply: Mailport: 05/09 This mistake perhaps added a year to our project. From the changing our zincs ONCE A WEEK, at our electricity infested marina, in the VERY foul waters of Beaufort SC... To the fact that the entire first day of our weekly visits to the marina, (3 hours away), was devoted to scraping the bottom, and cleaning the dive gear, & filling my tank!
All my friends who built there own boats, tried different brands of this concept. NONE really worked well as an anti fouling, but they could be bottom painted over. (which they ALL eventually did) Mine could be painted over on the bow & the amas, but peeled away, every one of the next 6 tries! Even trying to epoxy over the stuff failed. It would also peel. My brand had just changed hands, & the new owners changed to a copper FLAKE instead of it's previous fine copper powder. Anyway... I think that this is what made it electrically conductive. I have since sanded OFF & re epoxied ever larger areas of this stuff, untill I got to the point that bottom paint would work.
I was an ABYC member & wired Delphys accordingly. I also had a HUGE copper plate on the bottom of the keel, as both a worm shoe, to hold on the rubber fairing flap, and as a lightning ground. The Mast was groubded to it as was the shrouds & stays, but the mast electronics were issolated. (the black GROUND side, too... like the antennae bracket!) I was using underwater metals that were close enough on the galvnic scale, (according to the book & my readings) But the whole mess was bonded inside ala ABYC. I later had a conversation with Stan Honey, the well known marine electrician. (thanks Stan!) On his advise I seperated the bonding of the copper plate. I have since gotten rid of the rudder hardware seperate zincs, and now only have ONE shaft zinc. It is on a shaft that is bonded to the strut with a shaft brush, so protects the prop, shaft & strut, perfectly. I have also replaced my copper wormshoe with a copy made of a fabricated sheet of fiberglass, 3/8" thick. NOW, the small grounding plate is un protected with a zinc, and on the SIDE of the keel where it is easy to keep clean. The radio is grounded with diodes that allow RF energy to pass, but NOT DC current. My zincs now last 6 mounths or so! It is different with each boat... just takes a lot of trial & error sometimes. The above is just what worked for me. So, that's the Zinc consumption, and paint failure problems, solved...
BTW... We have found that IF we use the underwater prep kits carefully, we can bottompaint the shaft, & strut sucessfully. Even the plain ol 304 stainless, gudgeons & pintles! Works great for us. (not the folding prop)
Mark
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Old 11-02-2010, 10:47   #514
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Now, that last shot of the "COPPER-NADA", is one of the many times I prepped it to get bottom paint. The next shot is after days of grinding with an 8" pad & 36 grit, to get this HARD stuff off, without ruining my glass job. Followed by epoxy coats to re-smooth & surface the hull. This was all on this side seen, & the bottom from the keel to the transom. All of this was near the minute "juce", from underwater metals... I seriously doubt that the previous version of this product, sold by the previous company, (with the fine copper powder) had this same charicteristic. All of my friends WERE sucessfull in painting over their various brands of these products that were being tried. It really was a GREAT, environmentally concious, concept... Just didn't work.
Having finally gotten rid of those issues...
We FINALLY got our Centerboard, "just right". The Searunner plans I had were the 1980 version. They may have evolved over time. I wanted a perfect Rudder / skeg, and Centerboard. I shaped the board carefully, & made enough room to glass it 1/8" thick on the sides, top, and bottom and 3/8" thick, just on the leadingedge & "touch corner". My plans called for a full length rubber flap to fair in the centerboard, and keep the trunk closed when up, (which eliminates growth!), as well as reduces turbulence when sailing. It was a great concept, but problematic. I tried a hard conveyer belt rubber first, but soon switched to a thinner softer rubber. I did experiments in my boat yard, by digging a hole under the board. Even wet things, to simulate the real World. The best I could do was to seperate the front 40% of the flap, from tha back 60%, with an athwartship slit. This allowed the front flaps to stay out when the board was down, but the aft part to invert, when the board was coming up. Seemed to work OK in the yard. Then two years more work... from launch to the first sail. I got a jamb trying to raise the board! One of the invertrd flaps had doubled over on itself. It was SO stuck! Took DAYS to get un done. I tried banging down on the flap with 1/4" thick by 4" wide flat bar & 5' long, (from the cockpit), with a SLEDGE HAMMER. Hours of this to no avail. Next, I got a couple of scube tanks, and with a standard hand saw with its sides cushioned with duct tape, I sawed the aft flaps out of the trunk. This was hanging upside down, under water, while stradeling the keel. (used BOTH tanks) It was then that I decided NOT to replace the aft portion of these flaps. The front 40% part is where the board is going more for & aft, rather than up & down, so it is not a problem. The front flap has worked well over the years. I wanted a quiet centerboard. things like flapping halyards, barking dogs on deck, clunking centerboards, and Air X wind generators, drive me up a wall! So I do have the split tube at the top of the centerboard, and would not want to get rid of it. Our fit is quite snug. Underwater, with the board down, I can move the end of the board < 1/8" side to side. This snug fit, along with the fairing rubber flap, means that, bouyency asside, there is perhaps 20#s of resistance, when the board is half way down. add to that the 150#s or so to overcome the bouyency of the board, and the down line has a load of about 200#s? Certainly not more than 300#s. The forward block reverses it's lead, so would have a maximum load of twice that, or 400#s?
Well, this summer we blew up that forward block, for the THIRD time. Our boat is overweight, and this block was underwater. The previous two times, I waited untill a convienient haul. This time I learned that local hauls will be like $1,500, in & out! Didn't want to do the bottom now, so had to figure out other options. I didn't have the plans with me, And John Marples, "Searunner Trimarans", was kind enough to email the sheet I needed. He agreed that having this block a 3" inches higher, was a good idea, and he did so when his blew up. This would put it where I just could reach it. This is rather than the old way... tape the block to a stick, that I lower into the trunk, & try to line up bolt holes. TEDIOUS, and only possible OUT of the water.
I needed to raise the trunk about an inch and a half or so, which = raise the stern 6". I Dove under the boat & put a tractor trailer inner tube just forward of the skeg, and then inflated it under water with a compressor. Then put every float, fender, & closed cell cushion I had, under there too. IT WORKED! I raised the hull just enough to change this block. The really creepy part, was that for 6 weeks, our area was in the middle of a disgusting fish kill. So, I was diving in a mass of rotten fish, while doing this project. The SMELL!
We changed this block, and for good measure, we upped the strength of the other two as well. It has always been that aft reversing cheek block, & never with a sevear load. (perhaps 500 or 600#s MAX) The old ones did not seem very corroded either? The cheek pulling off was always in the act of lowering the board. The blocks I was using were Ronstan / West Marine RF871WM. If memory serves, they had a W.L of 1,700#s, and B.L. of 3,000#s? I KNOW the load on this block never reached even HALF of it's W.L., but we broke THREE of them! One reasoning is for this to intentionally be a weak link, so as not to tear out the centerboard trunk wall. The thing is, this last time the loose sheave didn't fall through like previously. It jamed between the trunk and the C.B., with the board part way up. There had been almost no load on the line, and there was no damage, but there could've been. We don't want the turning block as a weak link. We lower the board gently, & preferably at no more than 1 or 2 knts. if moving at all. Then rather than cleat that strong 3/8" line, we have a webbing sewn into it, into which we attach a cleated 1/8" parachute chord. This acts like a break away fuse. (it has done so twice, perfectly) When we need partial board, like sailing in REALLY shallow water, we do a rolling hitch to connect the main down line to the parachute chord fuse. It is a good system.
We wanted these new blocks to solve this problem once and for all! I found what I think will do the trick. Rather than 4 smaller machine screws, mounting the base plate, & a rivited axle & outer cheek... These new blocks have two 3/8" bolts. One of which is the axle! Harken all 316 SS 57 mm ESP foot blocks... #H6076 mounted with 3/8" dia, 316 grade bolts, into thick glass backing plates. These are almost TWICE as strong as it's predicessors. These retail for $177! It was worth it to finally have ALL the bugs out of our centerboard. A great end wall block for the up line is: Ronstan RF50171HL single upr. This new down block, located 3" higher in the trunk, does mean that we effectively loose some of our centerboard area. The board is a bit more sweapt back. It is fine however. The amount is small, and now the block is where we can reach it... Just in case! The helm balances better. And, yes, a few days later, I DID dive back into a mass of rotten fish, to undo the "float lift".
The other Searunners are all a bit different in the way their C.B. controls work, & the load on them. I don't know how the 40'er works? Roy, I'm sure you figured this in, but isn't that "work of art" foam center board that you are working on, going to be hard to crank down? It is a great way to get a couple of hundred pounds off of the boat though.
Mark
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Old 11-02-2010, 10:50   #515
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Yep, I dove in THAT! twice... Makes me wonder, "do I own the boat, or does it own me" ?
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Old 13-02-2010, 06:30   #516
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As a quick addendum to the above painfull, but ultimately sucessful story... When I don't have "spell check" I see just how bad my spelling is for one thing, but what I want to correct is this. Early on, I mistakenly called this offending "down" block, the forward one. This was not correct. It is the AFT "full reversing lead", down block, that has always been the problem. The second block that broke, BEFORE the last one this summer... broke a couple of days after we were just launched, from our 3 months in a yard in Trinidad. (Where I did the bottom & built the windlass installation) We were extremly ready to leave the country! So, as tired as I was of the boat yard, I begged them to pick me up, so I could fix this block. (we carried spares) They agreed to let me hang in the slings, with the board down, from sundown untill sunup the next morning. I only had overnight to get this done, and they would launch me the next morning, weather or not the job was done! They had NO spot to put me, and needed to start launching boats at 6:00 AM, with the lift that I was dangeling from. The pressure was really on! The photo below, was after staying up all night, doing this tedious job. This explains the extreme desire to have this "weak link" fixed once & for all! It was just too important a piece of hardware to be breaking regularly, but on a random basis. We crossed the Gulf of Mexico once without the board down, when block # 1 broke. Believe me, Searunners need the board!
Then, there is putting stuff under the boat to pick up it's stern, and diving into a fish kill... This fish kill, was a unusual & long event. (months) If I COULD fix the block, we could quickly sail away from the rot, & resume our weekend cruises to Cape Lookout. Otherwise, we had to hang up our sailing gloves for the rest of the season.
Before resorting to what I did, I spent a week riding my mototcycle all over, in a 80 mile radius, looking for a yard that could lift us for < $1,000, or had a crane next to a sea wall, or appropriate trailer, etc. I even looked for strong limbs over a public ramp, or EVEN a bridge that would serve the same purpose. We have no regular tide. The water here varies sometimes by 4', and is wind driven. The "dive in muck & fill an innertube under the boat" solution, was my last & least favorite option. As much as this entire story sounds a bit insane, I guess you had to be there. "Desperate times call for desperate measures".
Mark
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Old 13-02-2010, 10:23   #517
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Mark, once again you are killing me man! Oh baby, what we won't do for our boat (and kids) huh?
Couple things for you. I got an email from Jim Brown who wants stories written. You are a natural! Better take a look at the site, it is getting there all the time. I am so glad they are resurrecting Jo Hudson cartoons. If you look close you can see this was drawn in 1962!

The first sampling of The Ballad of Zachary Bone by Jo Hudson.

Also, I was looking at your center board drawings. (I do not have any drawings) And I see a notch in the back of the board. I have this same notch, and I was wondering do you know why it is there?

As far as spell checker goes, if you use a windows machine, google IEspell check. You can down load a free program that will install on your tool bar. I am dead meat without it....:-)

Thanks again for all your postings. I have had "0" problems with my board, but I am going to take a serious look at all the workings. Things like messing with the board are when I am real happy the guy built to plan!
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Old 13-02-2010, 11:05   #518
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Mark, I never had a problem with pulling the board down before. Due to the new board being lighter, I suppose it might need some more force to pull it into position, but I don't think it will be an issue. I use the portside halyard winch to provide the muscle to crank it down. But this is pure speculation, on my part, since I will be removing the old board in May at haulout. I've never had the need to use an "up" block as the board wants to float in that position when the down control is slacked. I'll send pics and details then. For the moment I'm finishing details on my new battery box in the bilge, the inverter/charger, and associated projects. Then it's back to remodeling the galley, including the new freezer/reefer under the sterncastle table. This summer will be devoted to overhauling the mast and rigging, then building the dodger. Yours is the coolest design I've seen yet. Great job!
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Old 13-02-2010, 14:11   #519
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Jack,
I have also communicated several times with Jim about the new Outrig project. I do plan to contribute... I have also sent an email to Jeff Allen, (builder of Sravaig) to share his Sea & building stories. He just closed the loop, on his circumnavigation, started about 40 years ago! Jim tells me that Russ Brown's girlfriend, (sorry, forgot her name), Is the "WEB wizard" putting the site together. So far, it all looks great.

Wonderful that they are bringing back the Jo Hudson cartoons. They are my favorite. In fact, the one from the old Searunner Construction Manuel: "You Weldum Aluminum"? Is the funniest I have ever seen! Jim says, it's everybody's favorite.

I will try to get thet spell check program. I have one with my email, & with Microsoft WORD, but not here on this forum. When they were teaching this stuff in school, I was, well... preocupied with other things! (left home @ 15, finished through as far as 1st year of mechanical engineering anyway.) Nevertheless, this spelling thing never took hold.

I'm pretty sure that the notch in the back of the board, is to facilitate pushing it down with a boathook, if it jams. Mine doesn't have the notch, & I haven't had a problem with the boat hook push without it. I do have a large well glassed notch in the aft end of the mini keel. Back to the construction manuel, (think, another Jo Hudson cartoon with an elephant...) This is for a HUGE rope around the keel, if I want to haul out on a beach, using log rollers & being pulled out with an elephant. I'm sorry to say it, but I havn't actually hauled with an elephant, yet.

REALLY Glad that neither you or Roy have had these block problems. Truthfully, I thought that since I went through several, as did John Marples, that this was common. When I was having problems with my rubber flap, I called several 34 builders, and they all said the same thing: "Oh yes, jammed right away, I cut mine away!" Now, it could be that my CB controls, based on 1980 plans, was too small a block, and has been upgraded? It could also be that my little bit of extra friction, from the remaining rubber flap, & snug fit, are part of what has happened to me? The way the 34 is drawn, there is not a lot of leverage working for you.

Jack, If you reach down in the aft of your trunk, as far as you possibly can, and can touch the block... Then this has been raised already, or the boat was built to upgraded drawings. If it is several inches beyond your streatched out finger tips, it is where mine WAS, but no longer is. In this case, It is like I have described to change... really trickey! John had also reasoned that he wanted this where he could reach it, when his went. If it all works well as is, both of you might want to consider carying exact spares of what you have , so even the hole pattern on the mounting bolts line up... Just in case!
IF you do decide to upgrade someday... I went from the Ronstan / WM cheek blocks with a 3,000 BL, (but actually broke with a load < 800#s), up to a block with a BL of 5,000#s!!! These Harken blocks are a design that is more likely to really achieve their rating, through superior design. They are all 316, the sheave is plastic, (no aluminum), and the load is on a reliable sleeve bearing wraped around the 3/8" mounting bolt, with the ball bearings being almost redundant, and to withstand only the side loads. I really looked around to find these blocks.


Roy... Thanks for the compliments on my dodger. I REALLY like it. In fact, having made thousands of "things" in my life, it is my favorite. Having said that, I think it just took to damn long to build, all curvey & sexy like that. I'd never do it again. I was a younger man then. I would consider a "stitch n glue", faceted, three pannel front face, (all flat ply), with flat ply sides, kinda like mine. Then you could have a arched laminated ply top, that over hangs the rest, & round the corners. (if viewed from above) You could even put a large deck hatch in the middle "face pannel". (that hinges down) The front pannel of mine was vacuumed over a mold, as was the top, on a different mold, then the transition PAINSTAKINGLY rounded to a 6" radius. WAY WAY too time consuming.

Good that you havn't had my centerboard downblock problems... I also have a portside mast winch to haul it down. I think it is a whimpy little #6, and I only put two turns on the winch, with a short handle. This is how I know that my 3,000# BL blocks, have been breaking at something WAY less than 800 lbs. They always broke in the act of cranking it down. I know that with this little winch, to achieve > 800# of pull, I would need to have 3 turns, someone tailing, and to really strain... like with both hands. I have done none of these! Perhaps these old blocks were rated only for "lab conditions", not with a slight out lead, & under salt water? My CB UP line, is just to give the lowered board a little 20# tug, to move it the first few inches. Then it too floats up. The 40'er is a slightly different sort of set up though.

Good choice on your batteries. I went with Trojan L-16s then L-14s (HUGE discount from regional destributor) If money & lifespan count, best bang for the buck. "Hydrocaps" make it where you only need water 2 or 3 times / year... IF they are still around. They work SO well, that I ruined my first set of batteries, because this Hydrocap advantage, made me forget them all together, and they went dry. I won't do THAT again. "Learn slow, remember long".

I have a small pure sinewave inverter, mostly to recharge sensative things like NiCad battery chargers, (like drilldrivers). These are sometimes ruined by square wave inverters... What I was surprised to find was, that when I ran my 13 LCD TV with the inverter, It used so much more than the TV's A. rating. Just having the inverter ON took about 2 A. It even uses more power in stand by, depending on how many UNused sockets it is wired to! I have since gotten, (from a laptop computer power supply company), a cigerette lighter plug to a black box converter. This steps up my boat's 12 V. DC power, DIRECTLY to the 18.5 V. DC that the TV actually runs on. (after the TV's wall transformer, converts 120V.AC to 18.5V DC) No inverter losses this way. I run everything that WILL run on my DC system this way. TV, Computer, soon even a "Car" DVD player, etc. I can watch a movie now, on less than HALF of the amp hours of using House current stuff, with the inverter. Plus... inverters BUZZ! Just a thought...

We have our fridge where you are putting yours. Works GREAT. It is way easier for people to pick up their feet for a moment, than to clear the counter to get in the fridge. Our little Sea Frost "fridge only" unit will make ice in theory, but it doubles the Amp/Hr consumption, so we seldom do it. A boat the size, of yours can really be a home!

We also have to do the mast & rigging at some point. The stuff is 14 years old now! Looks good, but... I may do the rigging piecemeal, then in a while strip it all & repaint the mast. Man boats are a lot of work.

As you do these, please show us photos, & descriptions. (Jack's have been great) Most of the stuff I have done that works well, was the result of trial & repeated error, or serious picking of other peoples brains. That is why I have been trying to share these ideas. I'd like to pick your brain too... From what I have seen, it looks like your boat has lots of innovation & superrior craftsmanship.
Mark

These photos: First three... Tiny boat / tiny inverter, The diodes that allow the radio to use the lightning ground, without introducing DC current into it. (= galvanic hell), The clutch on the end of your roller furling line. These have been a real hit in my installation business. They allow you to pull with BOTH hands, the clutch holds the load, regrip, and then pull again with both hands. OR, the helmsperson heads up & luffs for 3 seconds, pulls the line with one hand, (steering with the other), then fall off to stay out of irons. Repeat 4 or 5 times untill it is rolled up. Prevents a lot of fights from two people doing this job!
The last three... Beating HARD to windward, all the way up the East coast of Andros, in the "Toung Of The Ocean". Winds 35 knts. steady, gusting to 40. Seas 13 to 15'. Try THAT in a 34' monohull, while snacking on crackers!
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Old 14-02-2010, 15:47   #520
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Jack,
Thanks for the tip about downloading spell check through Google. It worked! You can see from the way I spelled "tongue" in the above last sentence, it was just in time...
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Old 14-02-2010, 15:59   #521
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Jack,
Thanks for the tip about downloading spell check through Google. It worked! You can see from the way I spelled "tongue" in the above last sentence, it was just in time...
Hey Mark, Thanks again for all the contributions.
I am such a bad speller, that the spell checker has trouble figuring out what I am trying say!

Leave Monday for the Bearing Sea, I will be able to check in about once a week if I am not too busy when we hit the dock. Or if we get blown in, I can get internet out in the bay. Blowing 100, XM radio and internet....sure makes the anchor watches more livable....
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Old 19-02-2010, 08:05   #522
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FROM ROY M :
Mark, I'm trying to be ready to leave on my series of mini-cruises in a year and a half. First I'll spend several weeks in the Channel Islands, ashing to weather in the Santa Barbara Channel, where the winds regularly reach 35 knots in the afternoon and the seas are nasty. After ducking into a protected cove when I've had enough, cleaning up the vomit and broken stuff, you can head out again the next day until stuff doesn't reak any more and you have discovered your sea legs.

The next trip will be to Hawaii for a whirlwind spin through the chain - there are very few good anchorages in that part of Paradise. Then north to about 50 degrees and east into Puget Sound for the summer, departing in September back to San Diego. Then, when the southern weather is ready, off to the Marquesas for three months (the limit I can stay in French Polynesia), and north again for the Hawaii-Pacific Northwest-San Diego circuit. Gradually I'll shift my three month Polynesia visits westward, but continue the loops back to San Diego, where my Social Security checks will all go to paying my yacht club slip fee and expenses. I see it as a sort of condominium payment, allowing me to return regularly to another place in Paradise. I like the idea of cruising, and I like the idea of returning to old friends, income streams, medical and dental care, and easy reprovisioning and yacht repair. I'll keep doing this until I croak, or become sick of warm water and frangipani, or cold, green water with oysters and salmon.

Roy,
Sounds like you have a good plan! During the years of our full time cruising, we had no land connection except renting a storage unit. We always had the extensive search, when we came back, for trimaran dockage, a place to haul, doctors, dentist etc. Like you have observed. We also missed many important family events, (weddings / funerals, etc.) because we were stuck in a remote area of third World country, where flying out would cost a huge portion of the amount we were hoping to get by on for a year! We had NO income. Only "outflow" of the savings from selling a house I had built. We also couldn't afford to go ashore & "see the sights" as much as we wanted to. (at least not the ones that cost $) We have found more & more, that in many of these Caribbean places, spreading the money around, is necessary to be welcome! The result of more and more cruisers, trying to share in their fragile & limited resources. Charging for everything thins the heard, but also makes cruising on a "shoe string", less of a successful tactic. It worked fine 20 years ago...
For now we will be content doing our local "brown water cruising", working for a livin..., and using the boat as an accoutrement to our lives. IF we still can, come retirement time, we will start with winters in the Bahamas. (diving in clear water is what it is all about for me) I hope we get in some central America cruises too. We liked it MUCH more than the Eastern Caribbean.
Like you, we will consider this our home base, and keep our slip. We have a perfect situation here, except it gets cold. Also, cruising with an income, rather than while watching ourselves slowly go broke, will open up a whole new dimension in cruising, from an emotional point of view.
Enjoy the Pacific! Jeff & my other cruising friends, ALL tell me that that is the BEST cruising. It may not be in the cards for us?
Mark

Photos: "I can't remember", in San Pedro Belieze '00
Divin for dinner, somewhere on the reef of Belieze '00
Our current stomping grounds in NC '10
Cruising Lake Isabal / Rio Dulce Guatemalla '00
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Old 26-02-2010, 18:52   #523
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Mark - thank you very much for the excellent write up of your early days with the 34' Now only if I had read that one 3 years ago (I am sure I would have still made the same choice, but at least...)

Drew - I have a rough trailer built from a mobile home frame to handle a 37 searunner and haul out from a normal boat ramp if you are interested and can find a suitable location to do the work. You would need to slightly modify (simple) to fit your boat as my minikeel is about 4" shorter than standard. Trailer is about 10 ft ??? wide. In WA state. I would need it back by the end of the summer (if everything goes as planned, that is)...

I am quite excited to have stumbled across the new outrig site as well!
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Old 28-02-2010, 15:21   #524
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Just waiting for spring around here!
Mark
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Old 09-03-2010, 09:54   #525
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I just posted the pics of my new centerboard (Cruisers & Sailing Forums - Roy M's Album: WILDERNESS pictures - Centerboard).

Also, because no one has done it yet, I started a social group for SEARUNNER TRIMARANS in the photo album section. We need an avatar photo (JACK! Are you listening?). Send in your Searunner photos to share in this singleminded group.
Roy,
Were you using the Gougeon Bros "Rudder & centerboard paper" as a reference when building your new centerboard? It looks like you used a lot of similar thinking when building your new board.
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