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Old 12-07-2015, 11:43   #3196
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimske View Post
Just an update on my head stay I guess it was much ado about nothing. I put the Jenny on the furling and it seems fine at the 500 pounds.

But I'm glad to have this conversation because I took the time to peek into the forward compartment where the head stay is attached and took some photos. Doesn't seem to be any problems.

Thanks for all the suggestions.
.

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Good news, have fun sailing, you'll like the conveniance. Boats are like airplanes in needing to be inspected regularly and having the preflight check list done, cotters in etc...
The big thing on ply boat is to preserve the sanctity of the skin membrane to keep water out. Making sure the sealant is good on everything that goes through the deck is the key. There are lots of things through the deck on Searunners from lifting tangs to stem fittings to check. On my boat I upgrade to sealing the sides of bolt holes with epoxy so if it ever leaks its a drip, not a rot spot. Worth the time if you have to pull anything to rebed.

Cheers
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Old 18-07-2015, 09:33   #3197
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Hi guys... "Long time no post". Referring to the "crash of 2014"... Thanks much to those of you with kind words and good wishes. Last year was indeed, a huge setback on every level, and Delphys' maintenance has gotten way behind. Almost all of it, btw, (meaning the hours needed to repair what needs it), is the boat's "structure", not the "systems" that make our boat a home.

Last post: I had previously mentioned my winter project of building a shop.

Since we launched Delphys and sold the farm (literally), almost 20 years ago, I have owned neither my own house nor work shop. Luckily I did still have my tools, tool boxes, cabinets, shelves, counters, and perfectly flat "epoxied" vacuum bagging table... in storage all this time. Unfortunately, this was in a building that a tree fell on, so there was damage to repair! I now, once again, have most of the tools accumulated from 45 years as a shipwright, (- what I lost in H Ivan).

After converting this recent rental garage and adding lofts, installing these refurbished items went far quicker than it would have been if I were starting my shop from scratch.

It is no surprise, but I find that doing many of my projects here, vs the beach, lean-tos, or borrowed spaces of the last 20 years, is much more gratifying!

The first order of business in my new shop was to install an aftermarket air horn on my recently re-built motorcycle. This horn is 139 db = LOUD, and hopefully the next farm tractor I pass will know that I'm there.

The next item on my long list was to re-build, re-finish, and re-upholster the antique chair on which I had sat for most of the >10,000 pre-Internet hours, while researching all aspects of my craft. All of this reading (in the early hours, before starting a 10 to 12 hr day), helped to assure a good result, and it helped keep me "juiced" while building my boats. Lots of this "research time" was in front of a wood stove, and it had taken it's toll on the chair.

Then, in Spring/Summer, I finally started getting caught up on Delphys issues, the first of which was repairing a couple of "zippers" on our boarding ladder's base/bracket. I have only had a few zippers over the years, one near a hinge screw that had allowed water past the coatings and into the wood, and the others were in locations like this one. I had a number of places where I glue/mounted something down to the deck, which had previously been VERY carefully glassed on the bottom, and then double or triple glassed over the top... overlapping the bottom glass. This was followed by sanding and triple coating with epoxy, TWICE! This works fine for 10 years or so, but not over the long haul. YOU NEED FILLETS!

To really stand the test of time, with things like this that are pre glassed and then mounted to the boat, you need to apply epoxy fillets all around the base's perimeter. Furthermore... In high impact areas like underwing fillets near the bow, epoxy coating these fillets is not enough. Here, you need a couple of staggered layers of bi-axial fabric as well. Again, this is IF you want multi decade reliability. It is easy to build things to last 10 years or so, but > 20 year reliability becomes exponentially problematic. The ocean, and cruising upon it, is such a harsh environment, and everything wears out!

THE LADDER:
I have gotten request for information in the past about my ladder bracket, SO:
The thinking here was to be as close as possible to the center of the boat, have it facing forward, (= into the current when anchored out), have it deployable in 3 or 4 seconds, and built to last decades rather than just years.

This design is very strong, and if I do NOT lean back... I can climb it with a tank on, but prefer not to. It is easier to lift the SCUBA tank with a rope attached to it, from a position on deck straddling the ama/aft wing crotch.

The wood/composite bracket is a laminated plywood rectangle that is about 3/4" thick on the inside and 1-1/2" thick on the outside. This is sanded to make a level platform on the aft wing deck, (next to the sterncastle), where the deck otherwise slopes out.

Then the aft 1/2" thick ply "horse shoe" is glued onto this un-mounted platform, at a 90 degree angle. The underside edge gets fillets that are high D followed by lower D fillets, getting up to a 6" R. Then the sharp outer edge is ground away to match the underside, past the wood and into the fillets, just like our hull's hard chines. Follow this by applying about 1/8" of carbon tows on the outer part of the radius and down the legs. Then apply half that much on the underside, followed by 3 or 4 layers of bi-axial fabric over the entire cantilevered portion of the bracket.

This is all sanded into shape and triple glassed with 3 layers of E glass. After mounting this base to the wing deck with screws that are later filled over, you "fine non-skid" the top, but not soo harshly that it tears the knees out of your wet suit. Finally, apply fillets as I recently got around to, and finish the paint job with LP paint. Oh yes... Be sure that the SS ladder's hinge brackets get 2" long machine screws, that thread into epoxy/glass fiber "solid places" that were pored and tapped ahead of time into the platform, prior to painting with non-skid. This is a high stress item, and it works these screws...

This has been by far the best boarding ladder on a SR that I know of, for utility and ease of use. It avoids the extremities of the boat and avoids having to climb over or under a stern rail, once you are on deck. For people like me who go cruising for the free diving once I get there, it was time VERY well spent. (Took about a week to build). For folks that only need a ladder rarely or in emergencies, something more quick n dirty may be called for.

BRUSHING LPs:
In my recent repairs to the ladder's base and extension of the fillets underneith, (which had only been around the top previously), I finished up by painting the AwlGrip with a 1" brush (4 coats over 4 days). It is not as nice as sprayed, but for repairs, this is what makes sense. The real down side of "brushing on" LPs is this... to remove the brush texture and sand into the paint "valleys" for a good bond, this "brushing it on" now requires a bit more 320 grit sanding 12 - 15 years from now, when it needs paint again. (AS ALWAYS... on newly painted areas use opaque GRAY primer first, as a base layer to keep UVs from shrinking the epoxy surface underneath). After this opaque base is there, all future topcoats require topcoat only, with no more primer needed.

Good sailing to you all,
Mark
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Old 18-07-2015, 16:16   #3198
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Nice to have you back Mark. That ladder looks awesome. You sure stuck to it with those tools and finally they are being used again.
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Old 22-07-2015, 18:48   #3199
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Great to see you are back at it. The forum missed your input.


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Old 23-07-2015, 13:02   #3200
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Thanks to both of you for the kind words! Now that I am productive again, I have been really busy on clients boats or more often... on our own.
Also, the year off from maintaining Delphys had reached critical mass. After a point, it becomes hard to bring them back up to "ship shape and Bristol fashion", but I am giving it my best. For most of her almost 20 years (since we launched in '96), we have kept her condition worthy of a circumnavigation and we both miss that, even though we have no such intention.

THE BIG CLEAN:
We live in brackish water that turns to fresh water in the winter. This is easy on the under water metals, and minimizes hard fouling, but makes the boat a mess above deck. This is especially true of the AwlGrip non-skid on the North side. It had turned greenish/yellow! Soap, a brush, and a 1,000 PSI power washer (@ 3') works like a charm, IF your paint is well stuck.

Except the new underwing paint... The exterior paint elsewhere, is 11 years old and mostly flat. Although I actually prefer the "flat sheen" aesthetics, it no longer repels stains and washes easily, as it did in its first 8 years. (We will likely re-paint in a couple more years).

THE OLD HALYARDS:
My sheets and halyards had all turned green, and in some cases, grown a crop of Lichen! All of this running rigging was 11 years old, but I wanted to get another year out of it, so did my best to wash everything, as I have successfully in the past.

First it soaked for a week, then... On one halyard, I tried sleeving it with a soapy rag to no avail, then used a brush. The brush got off most of the grape sized lichen but really fuzzed up the cover of the rope.

On the next halyard, I tried a Practical Sailor technique, and put the "daisy chained" rope into a pillow case, that was in turn washed in a horizontal "commercial" washing machine machine on "gentile cycle", along with other items. (Afterwards, using "Downy" in the rinse cycle) This did not remove but about half of the lichen, and ALSO fuzzed up the already UV damaged jacket. Strike TWO!

NEW HALYARDS:
On my most precious lines, (6mm T-900 I use for my headsail halyard and topping lift), I just used a soapy rag gently, followed with the Downy rinse by hand. Because these had less UV damage and less lichen, they are now fine for a few more years.
Everything else was simply worn out from age, and not washing them earlier in this moss/mildew and lichen event, was the last straw.

As is usually the case, I try to replace and upgrade at the same time. On the sheets & traveler controls, however, I would stick to good old NER Sta-Set. I use 5/16 for the traveler controls and 7/16 on the sheets, which swell to 1/2" in about a year.

Years ago... When the first 1/2" dia sheets were damaging the plastic "cap spring" on my Anderson winches, it was because the winches were made for 1/2" max lines, and mine had swelled to 5/8" over time! Regardless... 7/16" is plenty strong enough for any boat < 40', and fits best in the winch and in the hand for us.

All of the halyards (besides the creep resistant "Kevlar" T-900 headsail halyard), were previously 7/16" Sta-set X, and I wanted something smaller in dia, but more supple and with far less stretch. The Sta-Set X, unlike regular Sta-Set, gets stiff as a board over time! I hated it.

This time around I tried 3/8" Samson XLS Extra T (Dyneema Blend) on the staysail halyard. It was indeed supple and better than the performance of the old Sta-Set X. I did not want to go smaller, because raising the stasail is often done in a hurry with decks awash, so the halyard needed a good grip. This line was very tricky to get a good splice, but quite serviceable.

The main & spinnaker halyards were to be NER's 8mm Endura Braid. It was a GREAT choice! 8mm is quite small in the hand, but this means less weight & windage aloft. Even though much smaller... The new line handles and coils like a dream, as well as has way less stretch and way more strength, than the previous Sta-Set X. It is a bit tricky to splice too, but not like the Samson XLS.

With Endura Braid, I found that tucking in the cover at the end of the splice, rather than just sewing it along side the splice, worked best in this 100% "core dependent" line. I still got some extra slack in the cover, however, so attached the finished splice to a pole and milked the excess cover slack down the line to the opposite end. This gave me blisters, but otherwise worked fine.

For about the same price as my old halyards... These new smaller dia halyards make for a vastly superior line, that has a MUCH smaller coil hanging from the mast. It leaves more room to pass in the cramped space next to the mast, which is really nice when they are wet and I am not!

THE MAST:
The first order of business was to climb and inspect the rig, (which was perfect), and wash it on the way back down. It too, especially under the spreaders, was covered with green mold... I do this cleaning by taking up a stack of about 50 folded paper towels that are soaked in 70% iso alcohol, that is in turn stuffed in a huge freezer baggie. This baggie is hanging in the bosun's chair right pocket, and the used ones go in the left pocket.

After an hour and a half, the little bit of isolated mold, and complete covering with chalky paint, is nice and clean. The mast's paint job is 20 years old now, so it also is due for a re-paint in a couple of years... (when I change out the 20 year old standing rigging).

MY BOSUN'S CHAIR RIG:
Having been mostly single handed on my first two multihull cruisers, (until I met Mariam 25 years ago), I had to have a solution to the single handed mast climbing gadilla.
I have two chairs. One is the old West Marine Deluxe model which we have beefed up with doubled webbing, after a safety re-call. It is a great chair, with two huge double pockets to take stuff up in. I can spend hours working in this chair, because it is so comfortable.

On a client's boat... To get to maximum height, I have a set of 2" wide webbing "stirrups" that I temporarily attach to the mast head. In these I can stand up above the mast head if needs be. On Delphys, I have two folding mast steps mounted at the top of the mast, that are positioned perfectly for the same purpose.

For shorter but far more acrobatic trips aloft I use a SpinLock repelling style rig that is uncomfortable, but impossible to fall out of. It is great for working laying down, like to get to the end of spreaders. This chair, btw, connects up about 18" lower down, so gets me higher up the mast.

THE TACKLE:
The mast climbing rig configuration I have used for decades is a 3/1 purchase block & tackle, utilizing Harken ratchet blocks, and 1/2" line with a really rough texture for good grip in the hand and over the block's "one way" sheaves.

This one shown is 20 years old, and still works perfectly! I now use NER Regatta Braid Polyester for low stretch and better sheave grip than the Samson Trophy Braid I used 30 years ago.

It uses Harken's #1549 and 1550 ratchet blocks. They have a 1,800lb working and 5,000 lb breaking strength. Do not be tempted to use their smaller blocks! I did on my previous rig, and one of the 750lb wl blocks CRACKED!

I hoist the upper ratchet block (the one with the becket), using my new LOW STRETCH halyard. (If it is someone else s boat, or in question at all, use a bowline rather than the shackle). Mine is SO massive, I use it.

Next, you attach the lower block to your chair, and remember... both ratchets are carefully engaged.
With this rig, each pull is with both hands, rather than hand over hand, and the ratchet blocks hold you between pulls. You can probably even let go, but I don't do it.

When I want to stop somewhere, I fold 2' of the bitter end leg and put a loose half hitch through the bosun's chair ring. Then I can un-do the hitch and get moving again. Either job takes about 5 seconds!

To come down, I actually have to shake that final tackle leg's line, to get it slipping. If I am coming ALL the way down, I switch off the lower block's ratchet, and let the line slip through my fingers.

For this system to get you hurt, BOTH blocks' ratchet features would have to fail, which is not likely. These days, however, I get Marriam to handle a separate "safety" halyard, just in case... It has been a very long time since I used to climb the mast with NO chair OR tackle, by grabbing a halyard and going up hand over hand!

This system works better imo than ladders, or permanent mast steps, (even the ATN trick, or rock climbers handles). This is because with all of these, your hands, feet, or both are occupied in going aloft. With my rig, my feet are always available for fending off, and most of the time, my hands are too!
Oh yes... BE SURE to make your 3/1 tackle's rope 3X the maximum height of the tallest mast you intend to climb.

I STILL have rigid mast steps in order to go to the lower spreaders for spotting coral... and two folding steps at the mast head, and under the mainsail cover.

Hope there is something useful in here guys,
Mark
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Old 23-07-2015, 17:22   #3201
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

I've had good luck cleaning the green ropes by just soaking them for a day or two and using a. softer scrub brush. Mild dish soap is the next step up.

I like 4 to 1 on my mast climb rig and am interested in trying the rock climbing harness I've been using roofing.

Good to see those chores getting done again.
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Old 23-07-2015, 17:25   #3202
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

I've really liked amsteel for halyards and have found no slip problems using rougher wood cleats.
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Old 25-07-2015, 21:57   #3203
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

I've been reading this forum for a few months and am seriously having that "you're an hour late and a dollar short" sensation We are in search of a Searunner that won't break the bank but are willing and capable of doing minor work, scrubbing, cleaning, etc to get her ship shape, just not into doing a total refit or any major repairs. It has been my brothers dream since he got out of the Navy and actually bought plans back then from Jim Brown, long lost in travels though. This is his bucket list wish, so we are in the hunt before we get too old to manage the work required to safely blue water sail. So if anyone has or knows of a decent Searunner for sale could you give me a heads up? I have a dozen or more bookmarked but they are all ads from 2-5 years ago and since no one has answered the emails we've sent or answered the phone, I'm assuming they sold long ago. We'd prefer a 37 or 40 for liveaboard cruising for the 3 of us, but a 34 would work. Thanks PS Purvisgs if you are still on here and have your Searunner still moored in WA is there any chance we might be able to hook up sometime and take a look at her? Be nice to see one here in Washington
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Old 25-07-2015, 22:37   #3204
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

We''ve seen Marples old 37 in Ganges At Salt Spring Island BC. The story was it was bought by some Yanks going to cruise but they hadn't got around to it. I don't know if its still there but I can think of 3 37s in the BC Gulf Islands area. None are on the market but you never know, might be worth an inquiry.
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Old 04-08-2015, 08:51   #3205
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

So here is a pic of my canvas work so far. Still a work in progress but it's getting there.

Going to need some zippers and some adjustments. Still hoping to make the awning into a stand alone "windshield. " We'll see.[IMG][IMG][/IMG][/IMG]

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Old 04-08-2015, 08:52   #3206
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

I'll try to post a pic when i can figure out how on my phone. Sorry

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Old 06-08-2015, 15:51   #3207
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Chris Glass got his 37 hauled at the Driscoll Boat Works yard in San Diego, this week, and they were already sanding bottom paint from it when I arrived to check it out. It looks like one of the newer designs in that the chord of the rudder and the skeg are the same fore and aft length. He will be going from a leaking "non-packing" shaft log to a conventional Buck Algonquin unit. The shaft strut is located too far forward of the hub of the first generation Gori prop (squared off tips). Because of this he had always had a fair amount of vibration, he will be removing the shaft to test for straightness, installing the new strut and cutlass bearing, as well as the shaft log improvement. The hull leaks associated with these two units will be corrected by using appropriate materials and correctly installed. A couple of dings and missing chunks in the stem, keg and hullsides will also be addressed. When this work is completed, and the bottom painted, he will head south to Ensenada, about 100 miles south, to keep the boat in a marina for his family's use for vacation time. Over the next few years he will address the remaining smaller issues that he has run into. I'll send some pics in coming days.
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Old 06-08-2015, 19:29   #3208
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

A boat here nearly sank a few weeks ago when a drip less packing failed. I always placed a spare zink in front of the collar. Ended up being a nice insurance windfall for the owner, anyhow. The third I've had personal knowledge of in the last year. No wonder we can't get out nots insured!
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Old 28-08-2015, 21:47   #3209
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Did you Searunner guys sea the post on the Cheap multis thread of one in Costa Rica US$1500...???

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Old 05-09-2015, 11:51   #3210
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

So after a long hiatus, I'm back in San Diego! I'm not really in the market for a boat for a long while, but I just wanted to check in and see how everyone is doing.

Hey Roy, if you're here in town I'd love to come check out your boat at some point. Still have the searunner bug, if not the money for one! ;P
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