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Old 23-07-2012, 06:27   #16
smj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tropic Cat

No, I think its a very short conversation. If you've sailed in the tropics, then you've been struck by lightning. It's happened to me as well. The outboards get fried and diesels are unaffected. No electric or electronics to get toasted. This could mean the difference between having a nasty afternoon or losing your boat.

Southwinds, an American sailing magazine, featured an article on lightning strikes and boats in their June 2009 issue, and mentioned my experience in their story.

Click here to read my Lightning hit story in print. (It's on page 44.)

Like I said, it depends what you're going to do with the boat.
Actually for the open minded it's a long topic of conversation. We've done quite a bit of sailing in the tropics and never been struck by lightning. I sure would like to see the data that shows everyone getting struck by lightning that sails in the tropics! In fact the data that shows the percentage of boats that get struck by lightning in the tropics would be interesting as I'm sure it's a very small percentage. Anyway I haven't and probably never will base my decision on what kind of propulsion to have in a boat based on lightning strikes.
I do believe your correct in saying it depends on what your going to do with your boat. As a sailing enthusiast I prefer the outboards for the better performance at sail. If I had more of a motorsailing maybe diesels would be my preference. With our boat which is slightly performance oriented with outboards we tend to sail more than motor. This means less hours on the motors so less maintanance and lower fuel costs. As well as much more enjoyment for me. I love my outboards and you love your diesels.
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Old 23-07-2012, 06:53   #17
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Re: The Gemini 105

different folks/different strokes etc. Our immediate experiences upon becoming multhihull owners was very similar to Tropic Cat's. On our first trip, taking the boat home from Jacksonville to the Turks and Caicos Islands we were hit by lightning.

One diesel started immediately, and the other after I figured out how to get power to the starter.

Twin Diesels is now my favorite.

I also can see a lot of reasons for twin outboards, but in my opinion the list of cons for the outboards is substantial. The down side of diesels is basically just drag on the props. One con. Lot of pros.
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Old 23-07-2012, 07:05   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canibul
different folks/different strokes etc. Our immediate experiences upon becoming multhihull owners was very similar to Tropic Cat's. On our first trip, taking the boat home from Jacksonville to the Turks and Caicos Islands we were hit by lightning.

One diesel started immediately, and the other after I figured out how to get power to the starter.

Twin Diesels is now my favorite.

I also can see a lot of reasons for twin outboards, but in my opinion the list of cons for the outboards is substantial. The down side of diesels is basically just drag on the props. One con. Lot of pros.
I understand your liking diesels. Let me state a couple of other negatives to boats with their running gear in the water full time. The need for a good anti fouling to stick on the props otherwise you will be cleaning them every week in the tropics. The need to keep the zincs change to ward of electrolysis. And the fact that you will have 2 more holes in your hulls with twin motors. These would include both diesels and permanently fixed outboards of which there are few around. We also owned a cat with a single diesel and a sonic drive leg. Access to service the diesel was great. Manuverability under power with the steerable out drive was almost as good as twin diesels and sometimes better. No drag from sailing as it pulled free of the water when not in use. But the drive leg did have its maintanance problems. No perfect solution.
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Old 23-07-2012, 07:07   #19
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Re: The Gemini 105

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Originally Posted by smj View Post
Actually for the open minded it's a long topic of conversation. We've done quite a bit of sailing in the tropics and never been struck by lightning. ...
Limited experience in the Caribbean / Florida / Bahamas? Yet I would think Texas weather patterns can't be all that different.

As others in this thread have pointed out, lightning hits are very common in strong storm cells in this part of the world but then again we sail here all the time. I've now been struck twice. I have repeatedly stated, it depends what your boat use will be.
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Old 23-07-2012, 07:37   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tropic Cat

Limited experience in the Caribbean / Florida / Bahamas? Yet I would think Texas weather patterns can't be all that different.

As others in this thread have pointed out, lightning hits are very common in strong storm cells in this part of the world but then again we sail here all the time. I've now been struck twice. I have repeatedly stated, it depends what your boat use will be.
Limited? I guess it depends what you mean by limited. We have almost 40,000 miles sailed in the above locations including the Gulf Coast. This is on 8 diffrent types of cats and 5 different propulsion systems. Never been hit by lightning but never say never? Still wouldn't make a choice on propulsion systems based on lightning strikes.
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Old 23-07-2012, 08:29   #21
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Re: The Gemini 105

That is a very good point about the number of holes in the hull below the waterline with inboard diesels. Two more per side. The raw water in for the diesel, and the stuffing around the propshaft. I hate holes below the waterline....almost as much as I fear gasoline in use. I don't mind jerry cans of gasoline so much, they are relatively safe if managed intelligently. But when gasoline is being routed to places via hoses, filters, clamps, valves......especially in anything like an enclosed space, I get real nervous. We have a lot of bilge pumps on Twisted Sheets and they can handle a substantial leak. But they're no good for fuel fires.
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Old 23-07-2012, 08:31   #22
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Re: The Gemini 105

I have wind Gen, Solar and a single diesel, Most of the time the drive leg is out of the water,
The only time I ran low on power and used the diesel was when I first got my Gemini, I had every thing running, Two people on board, so the batterys went down quite a bit,

I ran the diesel for about half an hour and that charged the batterys enough,

I then only used power I needed and the batterys stayed fully charged,

Between the Solar and wind generator, I am fully self sufficient with power,

The P/O had a generator for power, But he sold it as it was totally unnessesary on board the Gemini,

One thing I will mention, is that not once did I feel unsafe sailing in my Gemini,
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Old 23-07-2012, 09:01   #23
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I absolutely agree with Canibul., Any gasoline propelled system has to be done right to be safe. On our Seawind we have two 12'gallon tanks mounted in a pod under the bridgedeck that are self draining. All fuel lines run under the bridgedeck into the outboard pods. No chance for gas or fumes to enter the interior or a spark source.
Considering there are probably thousands of times more gas outboard type boats than diesel and I can't think of one that has exploded they must be well thought out.
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Old 23-07-2012, 09:30   #24
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Re: The Gemini 105

As we seem to off the Gemini 105 and more onto cat engines.....

Does anyone have experience with a sailing catamaran having just one inboard in one hull?
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Old 23-07-2012, 10:40   #25
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Re: The Gemini 105

yeah. We did about half the thousand miles between Jax and here on one engine. In one hull. Our cat does about 5.5 kts on one engine, and motorsails even better. We saw single engine/sail speeds of 8 kts and the winds were forward on a close reach.

I developed my own techniques for maneuvering into marinas and making left and right turns with only a stbd engine. I'd use the engine to build up boat speed, then put it in neutral and use the rudders to make turns to the left. Backing up on one engine and making turns, or holding for a drawbridge with following wind and current was a whole nuther education in itself. I wonder if there's a book on the best way to handle all that.
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Old 23-07-2012, 16:15   #26
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I really appreciate the input. Here is a question for you concerning intended use of Gemini-
Is there a way to make it more blue water prepped? Like to go from panama canal to s. pacific and on to Indonesia - Indian ocean to med?
I know the cockpit drains should be enlarged - but to what size and how much would that cost to have done? How about getting pooped - how strong is the top and can it be made stronger? How much moolah? And what about the companionway 'door' seems kinda lite. What would have to be done to a Gemini to make it blue water and safer. Not north Atlantic or cape horn type blue water - but panama pacific indo route blue water. And I know 'slapdash' did it - but I am older and more of a cautious sailor. Any input?
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Old 23-07-2012, 21:44   #27
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Re: The Gemini 105

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I really appreciate the input. Here is a question for you concerning intended use of Gemini-
Is there a way to make it more blue water prepped? Like to go from panama canal to s. pacific and on to Indonesia - Indian ocean to med?
I know the cockpit drains should be enlarged - but to what size and how much would that cost to have done? How about getting pooped - how strong is the top and can it be made stronger? How much moolah? And what about the companionway 'door' seems kinda lite. What would have to be done to a Gemini to make it blue water and safer. Not north Atlantic or cape horn type blue water - but panama pacific indo route blue water. And I know 'slapdash' did it - but I am older and more of a cautious sailor. Any input?
You might want to get in contact with these guys. They just completed a RTW, and in fact their Gemini is for sale.
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Old 23-07-2012, 21:47   #28
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Re: The Gemini 105

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......... And I know 'slapdash' did it - but I am older and more of a cautious sailor. Any input?
Sorry, I tried to delete my post on Slapdash, as I didn't read your post until after I posted it. Seeing you are aware of them, you may want to contact them.
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Old 24-07-2012, 04:47   #29
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I am not bashing gems. People have sailed around the world in all kinds of boats not intended for it. Pick your weather windows. Get reliable weather data equip. Get a rabbits foot. And go!. The Uhuru a 30' Endeavourcat sailed across the pacific and down to Australia. I owned one and while they are a tough as nails boat. Not sure id replicate in the same boat. How much experience do you have sailing and also on the Gem? I do recall the builder. Owner of the gem that crossed the Atlantic saying never again but not sure if it was the boat or the ocean that made him say it.
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Old 24-07-2012, 05:38   #30
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Re: The Gemini 105

I have no personal experience with the Gemini, but will be doing a Pacific circuit with my Vardo.

The best way to keep a small cat seaworthy is keep it light and floating high. I feel this really limits the provision carrying on a boat like the Gemini which isn't intended for offshore load carrying.
I would actually have LESS gear for offshore (refer, ice maker, extra batteries, heavy reinforcements) except the safety gear of course. Just a few solar panels to keep the autopilot going. Get an air-floor dinghy with small outboard, no RIB on davits, etc. If you want all that gear you need at least a 40' cat to have something that will sail well with all the gear.
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