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Old 21-08-2008, 05:56   #46
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Boat: St Francis 50 under construction
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Hello Gludy,
Congratulation for your choice, we just also order a St Francis 50, and I register to this forum just now. It is my first post.
We are living in Cape Town and going to travel to the boatyard at least one time a month.
As you, we are now trying to define the different options, layout design etc...
Our hull#7 is done and the interior on its way with a galley up like nutmeg and seating a little bit different (less round) and we are still discussing with the boatyard to finalise the drawing (an electric piano will be integrated inside the return of the kitchen).
4 cabins, as we are a family with 4 kids we should be 6 on board probably 6 months and later 4 (1 will enter university and 1 boardind school for matric)
At that time I am working on global design and electrical consumption but I will be soon in detail.
I am quite happy to see that there is a lot of contribution on that forum and will try also to bring some little pieces of info.
Our program is also a very flexible cicumnavigation, starting from Cape Town at the end of 2009.
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Old 21-08-2008, 06:23   #47
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Originally Posted by Adaero View Post
I will have to disagree with you there about the boom crane. We chartered a Voyage last year and I found the boom crane to be a right pain. It always took 2 people to use it (or a lot of clambering around for one), everytime you have to disconnect the main halyard and then re-attach making sure there were no twists anywhere, sometimes in bumpy seas the halyard would jump off the crane pulley plus numerous other niggles. I do really like the rear platform but I didn't like loosing this area once the dinghy was on board.
Gludy, can you have some form of davits fitted rather than the boom crane?
My little 4"9" & 90 lbs wife can lift our 12ft Caribe with floor, chain locker, fuel, anchor, and rode. I could easily handle the 9ft. Caribe by myself with some added line. Positioning the 12ft is much easier with both of us once it's aboard.

I think 2 minute's worth of work is worth having the dink on the boat itself. Of course we did it daily for years, so to us it was not an inconvenience. It was part of the daily routine. Down in the morning, and up at night
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Old 21-08-2008, 06:43   #48
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Banana
Great to meet another waiting for their St Francis 50.

We are having the galley up but still with the pantry down in the port hull. The galley will be a horseshoe- we are cutting back on the seating area so that it is not so round - sounds a bit like what you are doing.

When is your boat due for delivery?

Our current plans will well may change is to crusie a bit in the indian Ocean so that we can leave Cape Town at a better time to go where we know not as yet.

We will be making regular trips to the yard as well.
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Old 21-08-2008, 06:46   #49
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Ireaney
Can I also add that this was the biggest, heaviest and yet fastest cat I test sailed. A lot of the weight of this cat is at the centre - she just seems to have it right.

When you see the video (voice over now in progress) you will see that no great effort was made to squeeze out every last drop of performance - she seemed to be very tolerant.

One factor that does concern me about much lighter , performance cats is that they seem more sensitive to extra load.

NordicCat - I will be asking the yard to do as you say.
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Old 21-08-2008, 06:58   #50
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Go and read the 'oops it fell over' thread again.
Tie down points under the bridge deck, mark out the cut here area, secure basic safety kit under the bridge deck or rear bulkhead where it can be reached in any situation. Doing things like that helps you to consider simpler what-if's.
Duplicate the lightweight stuff, filters and such. Stuff you fitted for emergency use isn't going to wear out, you won't need a spare!
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Old 21-08-2008, 09:31   #51
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Gludy,
Our boat is for a delivery in June 2009,
We will have the deep freezer in the hull, I think should be close of want you plan to do. I will try to post some pictures after my visit at the boatyard on the 28 and 29th of this month.
I try to fit a workshop also and still not sure the best way to do it because i need the 4 cabins and want to keep an desk on starboard.
Will keep you inform.
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Old 21-08-2008, 10:07   #52
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Well we arrive in the yard the day after you!
I think St Francis are thinking of expanding the production line a bit so my boat may be about the same time.
As we plan the boat around 2 is a bit easier for us but I am sure we can help each other with ideas.
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Old 21-08-2008, 10:30   #53
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Hi Banana, saw at the Southampton boat show last year a helm seat which was demountable with alternate tops to put on the stem. Like a saloon table, or a workbench and vice. Really made sense for marina entertaining and for workshopping anywhere. No names but keep an eye out at shows wherever you are.
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Old 21-08-2008, 12:03   #54
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24 volt system

With all the enthusiasm for large numbers of electric and electronic devices on large cats on this thread, I would say that you should go with 24 volts rather than 12. Just bolt a second alternator onto your engines to run the house banks, unless you plan on having a generator. What you spend on upgrading to 24 volts in equipment you will save in wire / cable diameter cost, and it is much more efficient - much less heat loss. I'd say your intended engines are too small if you plan on having all this stuff running on electricity. 135 amp / 24 volt alternators use about 5 hp each. Since you are going whole hog on the electrics, you should read Nigel Calder's book on the subject, if you haven't already. Calculate the wire runs for cables from the engines to the house bank, to the windlass, and to the winches, and you'll see what I mean. As for solar power, my recollection is that you plan a lot of northern European cruising where the sun is rather, well, tepid.
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Old 26-08-2008, 08:16   #55
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Eleven, thank you for the advice, I will have a look during my next visit to a boat show (probably Paris in december).
If I see it I will give the details on the forum.
Cheers
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Old 26-08-2008, 08:35   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
My little 4"9" & 90 lbs wife can lift our 12ft Caribe with floor, chain locker, fuel, anchor, and rode. I could easily handle the 9ft. Caribe by myself with some added line. Positioning the 12ft is much easier with both of us once it's aboard.
So are you saying the boom crane works for you? If so, how do you do you have yours rigged? I always liked the rear platform on Frolic. Did the previous owner put that on?
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Old 27-08-2008, 08:40   #57
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The base is mounted about a foot above Imagine's grated platform. The outer end has a sheave that the attatchement line runs through. There are also a small line left, and right from the sheave to the rear wall to keep the boom centered. I attach the main halyard to the line in the crane, and that's it.

If you want me to post some pics let me know, and I will take some for you. The cost about $50, and a few pounds of weight. SIMPLE! Oh yes, the previous owner/builder was a German engineer. He came up with a few handy, simple, and inexpensive ideas for the boat.
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Old 27-08-2008, 16:43   #58
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Hi Gludy.

Some different styles on launched Sunreef´s.
Launched yachts - Sunreef Yachts Luxury yacht building

From "Hanse yacht style" to more classic "boat style". You can look at each interior...and who know...you maybe find some detail you like?
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Old 01-09-2008, 12:14   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCat View Post
With all the enthusiasm for large numbers of electric and electronic devices on large cats on this thread, I would say that you should go with 24 volts rather than 12. Just bolt a second alternator onto your engines to run the house banks, unless you plan on having a generator. What you spend on upgrading to 24 volts in equipment you will save in wire / cable diameter cost, and it is much more efficient - much less heat loss. I'd say your intended engines are too small if you plan on having all this stuff running on electricity. 135 amp / 24 volt alternators use about 5 hp each. Since you are going whole hog on the electrics, you should read Nigel Calder's book on the subject, if you haven't already. Calculate the wire runs for cables from the engines to the house bank, to the windlass, and to the winches, and you'll see what I mean. As for solar power, my recollection is that you plan a lot of northern European cruising where the sun is rather, well, tepid.
I do not very often agree with Big Cat but this is the time , 24 volts is the way to go in combination with a buss electric control system saves a lot of weight and is simple to install.

Gideon
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Old 01-09-2008, 13:38   #60
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No magic bus for me-KISS

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I do not very often agree with Big Cat but this is the time , 24 volts is the way to go in combination with a buss electric control system saves a lot of weight and is simple to install.

Gideon
I'm not endorsing the bus system of wiring. I have been in two vehicles of different makes that simply stopped while driving because their onboard computer systems fried. The mechanics' take in each case was that it is simply random how long these things will last-there was no cause such as too much current, manufacturing defect, etc. Wiring is intrinsically low-tech, and I like low tech. Low tech = reliable and easily fixed, IMHO. I just wish that we were allowed to have traditional all mechanical diesels, but emissions controls have ruled them out, and now we must rely on yet more electronics to keep the engines running. I cannot imagine designing a sailboat that needs electric winches to operate it, either. KISS is my motto.
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