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Old 05-05-2008, 09:17   #16
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I love my solid foredeck when anchored. It becomes my front porch and offers tons of stowage in the forward lockers. Although I would appreciate slightly better windward performance (less leeway) , overall I have no complaints about her sailing ability nor would I attrribute performance to the solid foredeck.
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Old 05-05-2008, 20:21   #17
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thanks guys

My internet was down so im just now getting on, thanks for all the info on the decking, this will hopefully make my desision easier.
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Old 06-05-2008, 09:56   #18
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I'm sorry, but it's spring, and the thought of having to clean 160 sq ft more of deck space would kill me. Many boats also like ours have a central bar going up the middle of their netting which provides a solid surface. Over the years manufacturers gradually moved away from the solid fordeck as people have pointed out. If you look at the Prout Manta with the solid foredeck vs the prout 45 which came out in the later 90s with small tramps vs the broadblue 42 which came out after the Prout 45 with much larger tramps you'll see basically the evolution of the design. BTW, additional waterline does really help, my PDQ 36 would lift her bows very easily and give you that wilder ride (BTW, this isn't dangerous, it's just the motion). My St Francis 44 just moves very well right through, a much more subdued motion. Also I think a lot of cats are designed to have the center of motion at the helm so that portion moves less than the surrounding boat, where I imagine most monos would have that center of motion in the middle of the boat over the keels. I also think most monos have their weight more centered than many cats as monos have the big keel center and low. Cats main weight is their engines, many of which have their engines all the way aft. Out St Francis has central engines which again probably helps the motion.
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Old 06-05-2008, 16:45   #19
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I'm sorry, but it's spring, and the thought of having to clean 160 sq ft more of deck space would kill me. Many boats also like ours have a central bar going up the middle of their netting which provides a solid surface. Over the years manufacturers gradually moved away from the solid fordeck as people have pointed out. If you look at the Prout Manta with the solid foredeck vs the prout 45 which came out in the later 90s with small tramps vs the broadblue 42 which came out after the Prout 45 with much larger tramps you'll see basically the evolution of the design. BTW, additional waterline does really help, my PDQ 36 would lift her bows very easily and give you that wilder ride (BTW, this isn't dangerous, it's just the motion). My St Francis 44 just moves very well right through, a much more subdued motion. Also I think a lot of cats are designed to have the center of motion at the helm so that portion moves less than the surrounding boat, where I imagine most monos would have that center of motion in the middle of the boat over the keels. I also think most monos have their weight more centered than many cats as monos have the big keel center and low. Cats main weight is their engines, many of which have their engines all the way aft. Out St Francis has central engines which again probably helps the motion.

Thanks for this reply. I think I am seeing what you describe... many cats have their center of motion near the helm. Was driving me batty, but now I'm starting to get used to it. I may skip adding 4000lbs of concrete to my forward deck lockers.
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Old 06-05-2008, 19:49   #20
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Our Privilege 39 sheds water quite nicely with the shape it has, and it's nice to be able to walk to the bow (on solid glass) when anchoring - personally I think it's a nice design.
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Old 06-05-2008, 20:04   #21
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Near as I can tell, mine is exactly at the helm ... or exactly at the forward engine mounts. Which ever way you prefer to look at it. When under power the bow rises, and when under sail she sits even in the water on her lines.

I too prefer solid foredecks.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:29   #22
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How about retractable decks over the trampolines. I wonder if that couldn't be a future design, they wouldn't have to be structural so they could be lighter and small enough to slide back into the hulls. I don't know just crazy thought I thunk up.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:43   #23
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Tellie,

That might be asking for a wee bit much. Something like that might work on a SUPER CAT. My crossbeam, and platform to the crossbeam in the center of the boat work well for me. It also serves me well for a GREAT SEAT when sailing............
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:18   #24
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Tellie,

That might be asking for a wee bit much. Something like that might work on a SUPER CAT. My crossbeam, and platform to the crossbeam in the center of the boat work well for me. It also serves me well for a GREAT SEAT when sailing............

I love those crossbeams. I think it would be a great compromise. I wish I had one on my boat. I love the way you can deploy the anchor and chain on your boat. The tramp only design makes anchoring a bit more of a pain especially hookinging and unhooking the bridle to the chain.
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:21   #25
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PS To me in my dinky 38footer a 46footer IS a super Cat!
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:26   #26
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Tellie,

I like the way you think! That might be an interesting idea on a boat that has limited lounge area on the foredeck due to the deck angle etc. You could make it of large planks that might serve double duty as fender boards, med-moor planks, storm shutters, cockpit table etc. Or it could be roll-up and tied at the back of the tramp.

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Old 11-05-2008, 01:53   #27
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Talking to a couple of designers (Maine Cats / Broadblue) the issue of solid vs. nets seems to be more a decision by the designer to save weight / increase buoyancy rather than cost. It's less expensive to make the foredeck from fibreglass.

For an offshore passages its desirable to have nets with a large open ratio which doesn't impede the passage of water (both ways!) and keeps the bows light. Not only can water drain, but there's no temptation to load the storage spaces up. However, Prouts (which became Broadblue) have done thousands of offshore miles without problem so I suspect it's less of a safety issue and more of a speed/seakindliness issue.
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Old 11-05-2008, 13:16   #28
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However, Prouts (which became Broadblue) have done thousands of offshore miles without problem so I suspect it's less of a safety issue and more of a speed/seakindliness issue.
That is the conclusion I have come to........and am not sure they slow the boat down or make it less seakindly.

Still learning.
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Old 11-05-2008, 18:19   #29
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Talking to a couple of designers (Maine Cats / Broadblue) the issue of solid vs. nets seems to be more a decision by the designer to save weight / increase buoyancy rather than cost. It's less expensive to make the foredeck from fibreglass.

For an offshore passages its desirable to have nets with a large open ratio which doesn't impede the passage of water (both ways!) and keeps the bows light. Not only can water drain, but there's no temptation to load the storage spaces up. However, Prouts (which became Broadblue) have done thousands of offshore miles without problem so I suspect it's less of a safety issue and more of a speed/seakindliness issue.
Why is it that a solid balsa cored foredeck is less expensive than having no foredeck at all?

And Prout ..... is happily still Prout and selling boats as fast as they can.

Prout boats 2008 and 2009 models

Although, there must be an interesting story somewhere about the corporate decisions they've made.
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Old 11-05-2008, 21:50   #30
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Why is it that a solid balsa cored foredeck is less expensive than having no foredeck at all?

And Prout ..... is happily still Prout and selling boats as fast as they can.

Although, there must be an interesting story somewhere about the corporate decisions they've made.
Because GRP/balsa is very easily layed up once the molds are made - whereas an aluminium crossbeam and net are far more labour intensive and materials are more expensive. I thought all sailors knew that if something is engineered lighter it's going to be more expensive!!!!

Prout went bankrupt about 5 years ago. Broadblue was formed by some of the ex-directors who bought the moulds for the current (at that time) line. The first Broadblues (38 & 46ft) were Prouts. The more recent range has been redesigned by BB. They're nice boats.

It looks like someone has bought the Prout name here in Hong Kong but I don't think they've built anything yet.
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