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Old 08-12-2013, 06:50   #16
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Pointless.

We’re not such a “tough” crowd, so much as a little “opinionated”.
Of course, some of those opinions are based upon considerable knowledge & experience.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:53   #17
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Don't really plan on running aground, but no one does. I agree that some have issues, and others do not. As a novice, I will rely heavily on my surveyor, but that is not a flawless plan either, as Bumfuzzle can attest. They are human after all. And conditions on survey day can dictate success or missed issues. The best I can hope for from my surveyor is that they tell me what they found, but more importantly, tell me what they could not find, or verifiy like where are the inaccessible areas of the hull, and where potential problems may lurk.
I just think solid glass gives me a better starting point.
I really appreciate getting pointed in the direction of a few good boats! Thanks!
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:02   #18
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Wouldnt a cored hull with just the outer layer almost as thick as a solid glass hull be much stronger, more impact resistant, better insulated especially against cold and noise, and more buoyant in case of a bad holing?
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:37   #19
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Wouldnt a cored hull with just the outer layer almost as thick as a solid glass hull be much stronger, more impact resistant, better insulated especially against cold and noise, and more buoyant in case of a bad holing?

Yes it would, and it would make it a lot easier to repair, but it would cost and weigh more. I have been hired to add balsa core to the inside of a flex happy hull on more than one occasion. Some of the finest hulls made have balsa core, and some of the worst troubled hulls are Balsa. Most of the really bad delaminations I've seen have come from builder mistakes allowing moisture in from the inside of the hull. As for floatation, most J Boats wont sink past deck level, but their never the same when they get to that level.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:16   #20
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

The older Outremers are solid glass below the waterline and maybe the entire hull. The hulls are known to be fairly flexible. People have said that you can just push it in. It pops right back out of course. I've never done this. Those boats are known to be pretty stout except for the 64'. They had some issues with that one.
Pre owned Outremer 55 STD catamaran occasion for sale
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:28   #21
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

A poor criteria in my estimation--there are many more important factors, quality in design and fabrication counting far more. I've owned both both sorts and I'm fine with cored construction.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:46   #22
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Hard to say the weight gain from coring. I've seen cored monohulls that the outer skin was nearly as thick as it would have been without coring. Weight loss in that case.
If the manufacturing process is strictly controlled, then in theory the outer skin is thinner than non cored, and the inner skin is not too thick also. Then MAYBE there's a weight improvment... but I wonder how much really on boats that are hand built.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:46   #23
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Pointless,

I believe Outremer is another builder with solid glass below the waterline. I wouldn't let a cored hull be a deal-breaker, though. If you find a boat you like and it surveys well then the chance that you will have a problem below the waterline is low. Keep in mind that a solid hull does not exempt you from worry and maintenance issues. They can still absorb a lot of water if done incorrectly.
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Old 08-12-2013, 11:53   #24
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Your budget will come into play at some point. I like the old Catalacs built in England. They are not performers but have a great reputation for being solid blue water boats. They are solid glass hulls and are reported to be "Built like Battleships" They also have the added benefit of being relatively inexpensive multihulls. The 10M sells in the $100k and under range. Catalac built boats from 8 meters up to 12 meters and have a great reputation as good liveaboards. Again, they are not performance boats, but will get you where you want to go. Some Catalac advocates love to point out the "Queens Birthday" storm story where a 12m Catalac survived the worst storm on record in the South Pacific virtually unharmed when every other boat in the area rolled, was de-masted or sank outright.


I am in the market for a good 10M so if one comes up you can't have it!!
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Old 08-12-2013, 23:14   #25
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Interesting that I had my heart set on an FP Orana 44 out of the Carib, but I live in Australia and given that I could'nt trust a surveyors report on Osmosis I chose to walk away from it....broken heart.
But then we decided to build an Australian designed Cat with a solid Vinyl esther hull below the water line where the kit is manufactured in Thailand and I have to say that apart from some basic assembly issues I am greatly relieved that I took this path.
The fibreglass in the hull is typically 6~8 mm thick and in some places where bending moments occur even thicker...as an idea of weight...it is a 40' Cat weighing approx 6200 kg

Just as a comparison !
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Old 09-12-2013, 00:48   #26
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

You may as well have said it is a Fusion 40.

Cheers
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Old 09-12-2013, 01:04   #27
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

Most production-multihulls are solid fibreglass under the waterline:

http://www.cata-lagoon.com/documenta...l380_FR_UK.pdf
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Old 09-12-2013, 04:29   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by django37 View Post
Most production-multihulls are solid fibreglass under the waterline:

http://www.cata-lagoon.com/documenta...l380_FR_UK.pdf
Yup one guy on here measured his l380 below waterline and found it to be 3mm thick
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Old 09-12-2013, 13:39   #29
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

I am somewhat bemused by the fascination with "solid" "glass". It isnt glass and it isnt solid. Its a plastic, a two part resin that hardens, with glass fibre fabric to give it shape and structure and verious mechanical properties. Its one of the worlds great boat building advances, particularly if you dont use polyester resins. Cores, be they foam, balsa, manufactured panels, what ever, simply mean you can create a hull has enhanced properties, insulation, impact resistance, and do so with reductions in weight. The following analogy is a bit tortured but you will get my drift, Think Bridges, they don't use a solid lump of 1 metre by 1 metre steel to make a beam, they use two flat panels with a web in between to give strength in the vectors that is needed (I Beam).

Equally the quality of the base material is as critical, as mentioned, polyester is not a very good resin for our purposes, and saying the glass is three mill or 20 mill thick is pointless without knowing what fabric we are talking about, there are many sorts of fabric, all with different properties and different costs. There are also different weave patterns that have different properties.

From wikipedia
Quote:
Fibre-reinforced plastics are a category of composite plastics that specifically use fibre materials to mechanically enhance the strength and elasticity of plastics. The original plastic material without fibre reinforcement is known as the matrix. The matrix is a tough but relatively weak plastic that is reinforced by stronger stiffer reinforcing filaments or fibres. The extent that strength and elasticity are enhanced in a fibre-reinforced plastic depends on the mechanical properties of both the fibre and matrix, their volume relative to one another, and the fibre length and orientation within the matrix. Reinforcement of the matrix occurs by definition when the FRP material exhibits increased strength or elasticity relative to the strength and elasticity of the matrix alone
Then there are other fabrics, carbon, aramid etc. All with different costs, mechanical properties.

So the answer to the vague question is it all depends on the resin and the fibre. Cored versus solid? It all depends on how it is made and with what materials.
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Old 09-12-2013, 15:12   #30
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Re: Solid Glass Multihull

I very highly doubt that there is anyone here on this thread that was referring to a boat hull bottom being made of fused amorphous soda lime when they used the term "glass".

The term "glass", applied to fiber reinforced plastics has a long tradition and is well-understood in this context. As is "solid glass".

But thanks for the pedagoguery anyway

Mark
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