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Old 04-09-2007, 10:52   #1
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should we change our priority's

i recently heard of a poll of boats on morings in the uk that came back with the findings that they spent an average of one hour per year at sea.
with this in mind i was wondering with all the talk about what boat to go crusing in.
the focus seems to be on its ability to sail through storms, lots of boats are slated for there inability to weather a storm,
so even the global crusing livabords proberly spend most of there time at anchor, the saling time is the smallest part of the trip.
should the focus of our purchase be how comfy it is at anchor can we get a washing machin on it etc.
this brings me to the point.
what non sailing aspects of your boat afected its purchase.
to start us of ,one of the things we always look for is how easy it is to climb abord we have large suger scoops and molded steps.
so easy to get onto a pontoon or in and out of a dingy with shopping etc, this was a big factor as my wife is not as agile as she would like.
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Old 04-09-2007, 11:32   #2
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There are no reliable statistics on active cruisers. However, the folk lore says that cruising boats spend about 90% of their time at anchor. Don't know about global cruising, but for island hopping the Bahamas/Caribbean this seems about right - maybe more like 90+%. In my experience the biggest reason that couples abandon cruising is that it turns out not to be fun living on the boat and/or the budget they chose to do it on. Your live-aboard comfort level needs/wants/demands are personal to you. But if your bombproof bluewater boat doesn't meet them, you will not enjoy cruising. Probably, more cruising dreams are killed by crawl-in bunks, sitdown showers, cramped cockpits, and church pew settees than storms.
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Old 04-09-2007, 11:36   #3
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For my wife, there's a requirement that the boat has at least one electric head. She HATES having to pump.
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Old 04-09-2007, 12:07   #4
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I look at it this way. A cabin that's not quite as big as it could be won't kill you. A hull/rigging that's not able to handle a storm at sea just might.

Most crusing dreams are aborted because they were based on, well dreams and fantasy, not hard earned experience. How many times have I read, "never been sailing or been sailing once, want to retire on a sailboat". Now how on earth can this be based on any kind of real knowledge. Ocean sailing has been described as being like jail only with the opportunity to drown. At times it's down right scary. I'm not saying," don't do it". I'm just saying that in order to succeed, one should know what one is up against. Before heading to sea I highly recommend that you get some storm experience. Go out and get scared that you just might die. Still want to cruise. Go have fun!! It is fun, just not all the time. In order to enjoy that beautiful sunset sometimes you have to heave to in 30+ with waves from hell trying to sink your home.

Sailing is like flying, hours and hours of shear boredom, interspersed with stark terror. Anyone and any ship can handle the shear boredom. It's the times of stark terror that separates ships and sailor.
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Old 04-09-2007, 12:26   #5
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I look at it this way. A cabin that's not quite as big as it could be won't kill you. A hull/rigging that's not able to handle a storm at sea just might.

Most crusing dreams are aborted because they were based on, well dreams and fantasy, not hard earned experience. How many times have I read, "never been sailing or been sailing once, want to retire on a sailboat". Now how on earth can this be based on any kind of real knowledge. Ocean sailing has been described as being like jail only with the opportunity to drown. At times it's down right scary. I'm not saying," don't do it". I'm just saying that in order to succeed, one should know what one is up against. Before heading to sea I highly recommend that you get some storm experience. Go out and get scared that you just might die. Still want to cruise. Go have fun!! It is fun, just not all the time. In order to enjoy that beautiful sunset sometimes you have to heave to in 30+ with waves from hell trying to sink your home.

Sailing is like flying, hours and hours of shear boredom, interspersed with stark terror. Anyone and any ship can handle the shear boredom. It's the times of stark terror that separates ships and sailor.
thanks for your input but you have missed the point of this post as i have said someone always brings up storms
the other threads are there for you,
i am not ignoring bad weather sailing i am asking about other deciding factors
there are only two big ocean crossings the rest of the world can be day sailing give or take, so plenty of people can spend a lifetime costal sailing
but back to the point.
another thing is a good walk in shower its nice not to trapes of to the shower block in mid winter .
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Old 04-09-2007, 12:57   #6
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My wife and I have placed a premium on:
easy access into the boat (sugar scoop or the like)
standing headroom for me (I am 6'5")
the ability for my wife to handle the ground tackle and sails
single handed sailing
seaworthiness (safety)
reasonable sailing characteristics (seakindly motion and performance)

Basically we want safety, comfort and good sailing performance. This is because we plan to circumnavigate and cannot run to hide nor ask for outside assistance for safety or repairs.

We would love to have :
a washer
a bed that we did not have to crawl over each other
airconditioning
good cooking arrangement

all in a reasonable size boat.

This is so we are comfortable when we reach our port of destination and stay to explore and enjoy the culture.

So you see, we have defined our primary mission and the things we must have are more about sailing characteristics, safety and comfort undersail while the things we would like to have are more about comfort at the mooring.

I think the trick is to define your mission.
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Old 04-09-2007, 13:08   #7
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libellula,

Just as a matter of interest can you tell us what your short list of boats looks like? I'm intrigued as to whether you've found your "love to haves" in a "reasonable" sized boat .
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Old 04-09-2007, 13:20   #8
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Broadblue 385 or 42
Privelege 395
PDQ 40 ish
Manta 40
and Voyage (just checking into this one)

There are several other great boats out there and I am always open to know about them ( new and used)

I will ty to view these boats at the Annapolis Boat Show
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Old 04-09-2007, 13:56   #9
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Hmmm - didn't notice that this was posted in the multihull forum. Provided they have reasonable ammenities and the power to support them, most monohull cruising couples would think they'd died and gone to heaven if you transported them to one of the boats on libellula's list. However, the centerline queen size bed in the aft cabin of an old Hunter 40 is still tough to beat - uh, not sure about people who are 6'5".
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Old 04-09-2007, 22:17   #10
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libellula- have you considered the Orana44 from FP. Fountaine Pajot on this site you will find links to this boat launched a few weeks ago, also photos.
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Old 05-09-2007, 06:41   #11
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Philip, you're on the right track. Most cruising is done in good weather. OK, can't guarantee that but you'll avoid (for example) crossing Biscay in mid winter or crossing the N Atlantic in mid winter. Obviously whatever boat you choose must be seaworthy - and you'll decide on how 'bullet-proof' you want the boat to be, but the simple truth is most of the time you'll be anchored or on a mooring/marina. Comfort is important, as is ease of getting on/off the boat. After some years of mono sailing I'm buying a BB385. I think it is sufficiently 'bullet-proof' for the areas I anticipate cruising in, but the main thing it's comfortable.
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Old 05-09-2007, 07:06   #12
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TB
Can you supply the others that were on your list. I am gravitating to BB because I seem to get the most consistent answers regarding its seaworthiness though I must admit that some others sure are pretty!
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Old 05-09-2007, 09:09   #13
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TB
Can you supply the others that were on your list. I am gravitating to BB because I seem to get the most consistent answers regarding its seaworthiness though I must admit that some others sure are pretty!
any of the eu built boats all conform to a standard if the boat you buy is "A" rated off shore then it is going to meet your requirements
in the days of modern computer design with all makers asking there computer the same question you get the same answers its like cars how many designs are based on a vw floor pan.
so i suggest you buy one you like the look of has a good finish that will stand were and tear.
and one you can look after (is the wiring all tined can you get to all pumps engins etc )
bb does give great value for money the rigging isues can be sorted diy but i would pay extra if they would fit diferent hatches.
as to finish they dont varnish under tables locker lids etc and after a few years will the damp get in.
this is a new boat company and i have nothing against this but you cant go look at a 10 year old boat and see how well it ages.
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Old 05-09-2007, 09:19   #14
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good points
I will probably have the boat constructed to my desires including trysail tracks, cutter rig, hatch considerations, generator location (I do not like it located under the owners berth), I am researching the electric engines (I am an environmental professional-whatever that means :-) but it would also address the access to the engines under the bunks for oil checks and changes- oh I have a long list
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Old 05-09-2007, 10:13   #15
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good points
I will probably have the boat constructed to my desires including trysail tracks, cutter rig, hatch considerations, generator location (I do not like it located under the owners berth), I am researching the electric engines (I am an environmental professional-whatever that means :-) but it would also address the access to the engines under the bunks for oil checks and changes- oh I have a long list
there is a 365 2005 model galley up priv with electric engins for sale in usa owners version new demo boat .
i think you could get it at a good price
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