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Old 08-07-2010, 13:22   #1
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Seasickness

How does the motion of a catamaran differ from that of a monohull? It seems to me that having two hulls would generate a rolling motion across the beam of the boat as well as the usual fore-and-aft motion. With two hulls, one of them will rise or fall before the other.

Is it easier to get seasick on a cat?
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Old 08-07-2010, 13:28   #2
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In my experience it is much easier to get sick on a mono. The seems to pitch and roll more. The two hulls of the cat gave a more balanced motion. Others may have differing opinions. But I take less Dramamine on a multi. The only way to be certain is to get out there and try it!
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Old 08-07-2010, 13:41   #3
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less chance on a cat
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Old 08-07-2010, 14:04   #4
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Its all in the mind. But I DO mind. I hate being sick.

I thought cats hobby horsed while monos rolled
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Old 08-07-2010, 14:09   #5
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Originally Posted by mintyspilot View Post
How does the motion of a catamaran differ from that of a monohull? It seems to me that having two hulls would generate a rolling motion across the beam of the boat as well as the usual fore-and-aft motion. With two hulls, one of them will rise or fall before the other.

Is it easier to get seasick on a cat?
I thought exactly the same thing, until I went on a longish trip on one. I'm currently building a new mono so that where I stand in the cat v mono thing. However they do sail surprisingly flat even in 2-3m swells. You actually can leave your coffee just sitting on the saloon table until things start to get very bumpy. I'm building a mono for long open ocean passages. When I'm done doing that it will probably be traded for a cat. Go for a ride, you may not be converted but you'll certainly see that they have plenty going for them. The first day ever that my wife didn't get sea sick was on a cat and it was quite a choppy sea.

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Old 08-07-2010, 14:26   #6
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The problem is that motion sickness is somewhat idiosyncratic. What might make one person feel it might be different for another. For me, the rolling motion of a mono does it. I've talked to others that are more effected by the jerkiness of a cat. I do find that, for me, I'm more prone to it after I've been off the boat for a few weeks, but I seem to get my sea legs back a little quicker on a cat.

Try them both and judge for yourself. That's really the only way to know.

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Old 08-07-2010, 16:42   #7
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Years ago I was on a monohull traveling with a cat in the Leewards. All of the motion sickness was on the cat. Of course, mal de mer was a constant topic on the cat, so that might have been a factor.

I prefer the motion of a monohull in waves; the cats float over the waves, a monohull cuts through them.
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Old 08-07-2010, 21:52   #8
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More of a fore and aft movement on a cat. Not sure if that is a good or bad thing for motion sickness. I suspect different people react in different ways.
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Old 08-07-2010, 22:51   #9
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I was told by a usually reliable source that the US Navy did a study as part of plans for cat naval ships. They found that - while fewer people do get sick on cats - some become very seasick. Also, people generally only get sick on either a mono or a cat - not both. A significant number of sailors who never became sick on conventional ships became sick on a cat.

As I mentioned, I haven't actually seen this study. And I was told of it in a bar. Late

Anyone know of it?

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Old 09-07-2010, 00:53   #10
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If thereís some swell around and Iím down in the bilge/s, I donít do that well in a cat or a mono.
Maybe not related so much to sea sickness, but when youíre at anchor and there are some rollers broad-siding the boat, the cat feels much more stable to me.
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Old 09-07-2010, 07:30   #11
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I was told by a usually reliable source that the US Navy did a study ...
Probably not Lieutenant (USNR) Robert Schwab’s 1943 paper, “Chronic Seasickness: Neurologic, Psychiatric and Naval Aspects”

http://archneurpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi...t/48/3/496.pdf
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Old 09-07-2010, 07:39   #12
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I have new people almost every week from 2 to 8 persons a week and the seas run from nothing to 15 feet- what i know is grated ginger made into a tea works very well and if you chase it with some fizzie water and ginger snaps even better-
I rarely have people sea sick, 1 or 2 a month may get lightly sick-
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Old 09-07-2010, 07:57   #13
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Its all in the mind. But I DO mind. I hate being sick.

I thought cats hobby horsed while monos rolled
actually it all in the ears and eyes...

So maybe it's 'All in yer head' would be more accurate... ; -)
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Old 09-07-2010, 08:00   #14
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It seems that Charles Darwin was one of those "chronic" seasick people mentioned in Gord's study. He was reportedly sick for the duration of each leg of the Beagle's voyage.

No wonder he wanted to get out and walk around a lot the moment the ship touched land. But for seasickness, Darwin might be unknown today.

I doubt that this piece of historical trivia is much comfort while seasick.

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