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Old 05-02-2008, 12:38   #16
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Saildrive rubber outer cover

After re-glueing the rubber cover or boot on my Yanmar saildrives twice, I cut out a SS sheet that covers the outer edges of the rubber. This I glued and screwed to the hull. So far, so good. I hope it lasts.
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Old 05-02-2008, 19:54   #17
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Thanks Gord...That would explain when the Yanmar dealer recommended using the
Boat Life to install the rubber boot he said to spray it with water and let it dry awhile...although its good to know if one had to launch the boat it would cure faster in the water.
It has become a none issue because after dealing with loose boots over the years
the current one has held like the day it was installed 4 years ago! Now if I can only
get my zincs to do the same!!!

Hugo
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Old 05-02-2008, 21:54   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Polysulfide sealants, such as BoatLIFE's Life Calk or 3M's 101", bond to wood, metals and fiberglass; however, they can melt some plastics and acrylics, such as Lexan, and some vinyls can become softened by exposure to their solvents.

Since polysulfides are a moisture/temperature cure, requiring the absorption of moisture from the surrounding atmosphere, an increase in the relative humidity or submersion in water will result in a shorter tack free time and faster cure.

"Life Caulk" takes a very long time to fully cure in air - up to two weeks, and "101" is somewhat quicker (but still slow).
Thank you Gord
always good to learn a trick or 2 an d finally have no more problems with the rubbers coming off.
In the near future that will not cause a problem anymore because all our FastCats will only be available with the Green Motion system but we have over 50 cats in the water that regularly need the rubber put back on

Greetings

Gideon
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Old 25-10-2008, 22:01   #19
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I had trouble with the fairing boot coming off. While at Bob and Annes Boat yard at St James City, Fl They made a fiberglass "plate" or panel that is screwed on over the rubber fairing .Glue the rubber fairing to the hull and then put the fiber glass plate over the fairing and screw the fiberglass plate thru the rubber fairing to the hull. It has never come loose since.
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Old 25-10-2008, 22:17   #20
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I did the same thing as Tex HIll, worked fine. As for hitting something- I would say if it doesn't break your motor mounts then the seal should be ok. I've had a volvo now for 7yrs. One boat yard picked up the boat by the leg, broke the motor mounts and streached the seal. It wasn't broke but I made them replace seal and mounts. Carefull not to paint leg with copper bottom paint.
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Old 26-10-2008, 06:40   #21
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I replaced one my Volvo fairing boots with a flat piece of neoprene that I purchased at at Apple Industrial Supply Company (hardware store) in Ft. Pierce. I first tried the truck inner tube suggestion as someone previously mentioned here on this post but could not get a flat enough piece that would lay up nicely to the hull. Plus I heard it's best to use neoprene. After buying a sheet of this neoprene I was able to lay it out flat and cut out a perfect boot using the old boot as a template. I then made a slit for the saildrive to fit through. I sanded the hull area real well then applied a thin layer of 5200 to both the hull and the top side of the new boot. With a few extra hands I applied it to the hull while tacky. So far it's been over six months and a few hundred miles (Bahamas and back) and the boot is still perfectly in place. If your hull is cored (balsa or foam) below the waterline I would be very leary about drilling a hole into the bottom of my hull without taking major precautions that would prevent penetration to the core. Actually I cut out a few as spares for the future if someone else needs one for a Volvo Saildrive. I'd send one for free in leui of karma points..,
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Old 03-11-2008, 14:50   #22
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Sail Drive Boot Problem

For what it's worth, I just came across this website that describes just the type of problem the original poster was worried about - although the accident did not involve hitting a log, but dropping a line in the water whcih ripped the engine off of its mounts and dislodged the sail drive boot. On The Hard

Still seems like a pretty rare occurence.
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Old 03-11-2008, 16:08   #23
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I just read the "On the Hard" bit. One thing though the picture Where "Here he's removing the old copper-based paint" sanding the saildrive, I was told never use copper based paint on saildrives??
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Old 04-11-2008, 06:44   #24
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Read further down in "On The Hard". They acknowledge copper paint should not have been used on their saildrives, and relate the story of saildrives on another cat "rotting out" because of the action of the copper paint on the aluminum.
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Old 04-11-2008, 16:15   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCCatSailor View Post
Read further down in "On The Hard". They acknowledge copper paint should not have been used on their saildrives, and relate the story of saildrives on another cat "rotting out" because of the action of the copper paint on the aluminum.

Sorry I hadn't read down that far. I have heard and seen simialar stories.
Luckily, I was warned before my first haulout or I would have done the same. Spread the Word!
Brad
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Old 04-11-2008, 23:08   #26
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I have painted the sail drive legs with coppercoat with 4 layers of epoxy in between and it works fine , no corrosion problems at all and reasonable clean legs, forthe props I use
a paint made by international paints called Trilux Prop-O-Drev and that works ok.
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Old 08-11-2008, 03:35   #27
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2 comments

I have Volvo's and the outer boot on mine is held on by cutting four pieces of SS rub strake 1/2 to 3/4" and screwing them in at the edge of all four sides. a Volvo mechanic taught me this and it has worked without fail. Liberal use of 5200 was also part of the install.

I also wanted to chime in on a saildrive's possibly gounding. Mine ARE protected by the keel but amazingly I hit a rock in the bahamas and the the keel slid up on top of the rock, lifting the boat up by 6 or more inches. the boat continued to move forward sliding on the rock. When the keel passed over the rock the boat came down and the rock was just high enough to cliip the prop and nail the rudder. the rudder post bent and the rock shoved the rudder up into the hull by 3 inches. the hull was pierced but fortunately I have fore and aft crashboxes and did not even know that I had taken on water until I hauled a few weeks later. the saildrive was undamaged although the prop was wasted. I just shows an interesting possibility even when your keels are supposedly protecting everything. another caution: I thought that I was unharmed after hitting the rock because I was so confident that the keel took all the impact. PS I have since changed the rudders such that the lower half is lightly fiberglassed foam that will break away should it happen again. remember----you ain't been around till you've been aground!!!
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Old 28-03-2012, 21:15   #28
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Re: Saildrive Boot:

I know this thread is more than 3 years old, but have come
across it and wanted to report that my lower rubber boot on
my Yanmar sd20 saildrive is still intact after 8 years.
(See my post #14 and 17 this thread) This is truly amazing to me because prior to using Boatlife chaulk to attach the boot it
would come loose/off every year or so.
I know some would say this is not the proper use for Boatlife
but this is my experience and thought I would share as I know
having the boot stay put is an ongoing problem for some.
Hope this helps someone.
Hugo
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Old 04-07-2016, 06:16   #29
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Re: Saildrive Boot

I realize this thread is old, however, the topic never gets old, and is especially relevant for me having ruptured a saildrive boot at sea yesterday. We were sailing at night about three miles off the coast of Texas near Freeport when we struck a submerged tree that had washed out to sea due to recent flooding in the area. We were beating to weather in 20 knots of breeze and moderate seas with a clear radar screen. We hit the log moving at about 5 knots. The modified full keel on our Lancer 40 monohull went up and over and smacked the saildrive hard, lodging between the keel and drive. The tree was about 60' long and 3' in diameter. Crew went below and called out we had a breach and water was above the cabin sole. By the time I went below within 5 minutes of the colision there was 6" of water above the sole. By the time I got pillow cases and towels chinked into the opening about 10 minutes later there was at least 12" of water above the sole and above the engine crankshaft. We were relatively close to the Freeport Coast Guard Station and they were on board within 20 minutes of making the Mayday call, and had a 2" pump running immediately thereafter. We were towed in, but the boat will likely be a total loss. We are very thankful for our CG rescue team, they did a great job and took extra good care of us. Two things I took away from this (as it relates to sailing that is): 1. The breached area of the boot was underneath the engine (Volvo MD17C with 110SD), very hard to get to, a difficult shape to plug, and it let in a tremendous amount of water very quickly. The breach was too big for pillow cases and wash rags, but the access under the engine was too tight for a bath towel. The best option we had was hand towels and it took several. The log would bump the sail drive and make it move, opening up the breach and undoing the plug. Even after we were free from the log the wave action did the same thing to a lesser degree. One ought to think about how to access the forward part of the boot, and practice getting to it to find the best plugging material. The Coast Guard tried to plug it at the dock with wedges and oakum, but the towels I had used originally actually did a better job because the breach was too big for the Oakum. 2. Anything stored on the floor will be washing around the boat once it is flooded. We kept our trash bags in a cabinet on the floor. When the CG deployed their pump it kept getting clogged by the trash sacks that were floating around everywhere. Next time our trash sacks will kept up high. There was also cardboard debris everywhere that troubled the pumping, so we will not have any boxes on board from now on.

I know sail drives are popular, and an efficient design tool to keep the dive train compact and almost all the time they work great. I could back my monohull better than my conventional drive friends for sure. But after this experience I will be going to a conventional drive in future boats. If this same scenario had happened to a conventional drive we would have likely had no water intrusion, possibly prop and rudder damage, and maybe a bent shaft, but the nature of our call would likely have been one of assistance rather than distress, and we might have even sailed the boat on in. In any case it likely would not have totaled the boat.
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Old 04-07-2016, 13:15   #30
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Re: Saildrive Boot

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdhorner View Post
I realize this thread is old, however, the topic never gets old, and is especially relevant for me having ruptured a saildrive boot at sea yesterday. We were sailing at night about three miles off the coast of Texas near Freeport when we struck a submerged tree that had washed out to sea due to recent flooding in the area. We were beating to weather in 20 knots of breeze and moderate seas with a clear radar screen. We hit the log moving at about 5 knots. The modified full keel on our Lancer 40 monohull went up and over and smacked the saildrive hard, lodging between the keel and drive. The tree was about 60' long and 3' in diameter. Crew went below and called out we had a breach and water was above the cabin sole. By the time I went below within 5 minutes of the colision there was 6" of water above the sole. By the time I got pillow cases and towels chinked into the opening about 10 minutes later there was at least 12" of water above the sole and above the engine crankshaft. We were relatively close to the Freeport Coast Guard Station and they were on board within 20 minutes of making the Mayday call, and had a 2" pump running immediately thereafter. We were towed in, but the boat will likely be a total loss. We are very thankful for our CG rescue team, they did a great job and took extra good care of us. Two things I took away from this (as it relates to sailing that is): 1. The breached area of the boot was underneath the engine (Volvo MD17C with 110SD), very hard to get to, a difficult shape to plug, and it let in a tremendous amount of water very quickly. The breach was too big for pillow cases and wash rags, but the access under the engine was too tight for a bath towel. The best option we had was hand towels and it took several. The log would bump the sail drive and make it move, opening up the breach and undoing the plug. Even after we were free from the log the wave action did the same thing to a lesser degree. One ought to think about how to access the forward part of the boot, and practice getting to it to find the best plugging material. The Coast Guard tried to plug it at the dock with wedges and oakum, but the towels I had used originally actually did a better job because the breach was too big for the Oakum. 2. Anything stored on the floor will be washing around the boat once it is flooded. We kept our trash bags in a cabinet on the floor. When the CG deployed their pump it kept getting clogged by the trash sacks that were floating around everywhere. Next time our trash sacks will kept up high. There was also cardboard debris everywhere that troubled the pumping, so we will not have any boxes on board from now on.

I know sail drives are popular, and an efficient design tool to keep the dive train compact and almost all the time they work great. I could back my monohull better than my conventional drive friends for sure. But after this experience I will be going to a conventional drive in future boats. If this same scenario had happened to a conventional drive we would have likely had no water intrusion, possibly prop and rudder damage, and maybe a bent shaft, but the nature of our call would likely have been one of assistance rather than distress, and we might have even sailed the boat on in. In any case it likely would not have totaled the boat.
You certainly were unfortunate, it sounds like the way the tree hit is the nemesis of saildrives. In catamarans, a popular design is a solid bulkhead fore and aft of the engine which extends several inches above the waterline. With such a design and an accident like your's, it's not quite the dire situation you experienced. In my boat, I would guess maybe 20-25 gallons of water is all that could enter.

Saildrives have pluses and minuses, you unfortunately experienced that 1 in a million accident.

Glad to hear all made it safe!
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