Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 30-11-2013, 09:19   #16
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Martinique on route to Tasmania
Boat: Catana 42
Posts: 134
Re: If you're going to dream....

Hi MoxieGirl,


Hooray to you and congrats for deciding what it is you want - having the big hairy audacious goal, it's the first half of getting there.
Live by the motto - Go Big or Go Home!

My captain and I have recently purchased a new catana which is nearing completion now. We have sold our home and have given notice to our jobs and told our children we are leaving them. No doubt we can work it out once we get on the water, plus my husband knows what he's doing or so I am lead to believe!

I can't sail, but know how to dream and believe life is too short to work at my desk until I give up and die. Due to working stupid until our departure learning will be tricky for me but no doubt learning on the job will apply. So basically I'm saying if I can do it you can too =)


Good luck and let us know if you set up a site for us to follow your adventures

the Miss
Homepage | Miss Catana
__________________

__________________
The Miss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2013, 09:31   #17
Registered User
 
deckofficer's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northern and Southern California
Boat: too many
Posts: 4,198
Images: 4
Re: If you're going to dream....

Hey MoxieGirl, The Miss knows about going big, just research Catana catamarans and you will know what I mean. Fresh lemon helps for the person that doesn't like fish and Salmon IMHO is the best for folks that say they don't like fish.
__________________

__________________
Bob
USCG Unlimited Tonnage Open Ocean (CMA)
http://tbuckets.lefora.com/
deckofficer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 02:23   #18
Registered User
 
MoxieGirl's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 78
Re: If you're going to dream....

The Miss - LOVE your website! The site is VERY well done, artistic and informative. And the boat is simply amazing! You are going to have a fantastic time!

Have taken deckofficers advice and started reading up on the Catanas (also the Seawind mentioned on your sight). They are very nice boats. Have so far been researching the Antares, so it seems I'm thinking along the same lines.

Just my very 'early days' impression here. I've read a number of blogs from both monohull and multihull liveaboards. It's almost, if you were to compare it with camping, like the monohull couples have grabbed a couple backpacks with tents and supplies and headed off into the woods to camp. Whereas the multihulls have loaded up the camper, hitched it to the family car before heading to the woods.

Both styles of camping (or sailing) has an appeal, and neither is right/wrong, better/worse, just different. I like the idea of minimal living and not needing a lot of money (one couple said they budgeted about $120 a week for food and fuel). But I also adore catamarans. Their stability, comfort (cause, in truth, I like my comfort), roominess, safety and I'm constantly amazed at how small the hulls look from the outside, but how much fits in them on the inside! I think some tardis magic is going on there, to be honest.

MG
__________________
MoxieGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 03:22   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Martinique on route to Tasmania
Boat: Catana 42
Posts: 134
Re: If you're going to dream....

Hi Moxie Girl,

Firstly I am so pleased you like my site - it is a thrill to know others are enjoying my "folly". I find it fascinating that others follow particulary when we are a bit away from getting our boat wet. However saying that I love it when someone new signs up to follow. My aim is to keep my site honest and real so sometimes I find myself probably telling too much but to the rest of the world but appreciate your compliment!

The Catana is beautiful but so many boats are, but we are very happy with our pick

Our travel plans are for 4 to 5 years so camping is not an option. We plan to be comfortable but the most importantly safe, hence the Catana as our boat of choice. Mind you over the years we have done heaps of camping and have loved every minute of it. Less is more with camping and that's half the fun.

Best of luck with travels and keep in touch and let us know what you end up buying. You will have to keep an eye on the miss and I will keep you up to speed on how learning how to sail goes. I'm looking forward to it.

Cheers

the Miss
__________________
The Miss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 22:51   #20
Registered User
 
tomfl's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Florida
Boat: Seawind 1000xl
Posts: 1,959
Images: 10
Re: If you're going to dream....

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoxieGirl View Post
SNIP
Have taken deckofficers advice and started reading up on the Catanas (also the Seawind mentioned on your sight). They are very nice boats. Have so far been researching the Antares, so it seems I'm thinking along the same lines.

SNIP
Both Catanas and Seawinds are well known catamarans. But there are a lot of others. I spent a lot of time looking at boats before getting mine. I never seriously considered a monohull. First I looked at Fboats and for many folks this is a great choice. Looked at a Telstar which is less common but also a reasonable choice. Also looked at a PDQ and a Seawind 1000xl. I really like the Seawind. I have also been on boats like Catanas, FPs, Lagoons, and more. Also seen vids of what I will call my dream only boats like a Gunboat.

I don't really think a Catana and a Seawind are the same type of boat. One thing I have been doing is going out in my dinky and taking pix of cats from the stern. Boats like a PDQ or Seawind have much narrower hulls than a Catana or FP. As you research cats you will hear the term condomaran. I have friends who have boats like that and they are very comfortable and often have a lot more things on them than a simpler boat.

As an example my Seawind has two outboards in wells (like some PDQs). While it is probably a little underpowered in high winds and heavy seas the outboards are much lighter and cheaper and easier to maintain than the inboards something like a Catana will have. Same goes for things like an installed genset, and a lot of other creature comforts.

There is no real right or wrong answer to which boat is better, just a personal choice as to which compromises you think are important to make. I have seen some folks say they don't like the Seawind's open salon and cockpit because it gets too cold in the winter, but for someone like me who lives and sails in the tropics that is a non factor. For someone in the Pacific Northwest where it gets cold that could be an issue.

You are the best person to make up a list of what you want in a boat and how and where you want to sail it. That will make selecting the right one for you a lot easier.
__________________
tomfl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 01:11   #21
Registered User
 
MoxieGirl's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfl View Post
Both Catanas and Seawinds are well known catamarans. But there are a lot of others. I spent a lot of time looking at boats before getting mine. I never seriously considered a monohull. First I looked at Fboats and for many folks this is a great choice. Looked at a Telstar which is less common but also a reasonable choice. Also looked at a PDQ and a Seawind 1000xl. I really like the Seawind. I have also been on boats like Catanas, FPs, Lagoons, and more. Also seen vids of what I will call my dream only boats like a Gunboat. I don't really think a Catana and a Seawind are the same type of boat. One thing I have been doing is going out in my dinky and taking pix of cats from the stern. Boats like a PDQ or Seawind have much narrower hulls than a Catana or FP. As you research cats you will hear the term condomaran. I have friends who have boats like that and they are very comfortable and often have a lot more things on them than a simpler boat. As an example my Seawind has two outboards in wells (like some PDQs). While it is probably a little underpowered in high winds and heavy seas the outboards are much lighter and cheaper and easier to maintain than the inboards something like a Catana will have. Same goes for things like an installed genset, and a lot of other creature comforts. There is no real right or wrong answer to which boat is better, just a personal choice as to which compromises you think are important to make. I have seen some folks say they don't like the Seawind's open salon and cockpit because it gets too cold in the winter, but for someone like me who lives and sails in the tropics that is a non factor. For someone in the Pacific Northwest where it gets cold that could be an issue. You are the best person to make up a list of what you want in a boat and how and where you want to sail it. That will make selecting the right one for you a lot easier.
Tomfl, thank you for a fantastic, and informative reply.

Like you, I'm not seriously considering monohulls. Although I can't wait to sail on one, and I think they are lovely and romantic boats, I have friends and family who don't do well with motion sickness, and the cats are SO much more stable. Just really can't be dealing with the whole tipping to one side and all that (I know, there are sailing terms for it, will learn them soon enough, LOL).

I've already started forming ideas of what I want in a cat, even though I haven't set foot on one. And I'm fully prepared for my ideas to mature as I learn more and get out there and see some. So, nothing is really set in stone yet. But... I would like an enclosed cockpit. I live in England, which probably explains it all.

I don't want a bit cat, don't need to sleep a dozen people. 4-6 tops I would imagine, and that would only be occasionally.

The only thing I don't like about the cats (and I know all of them aren't this way) is the very 'square' bow. OK, 'square' probably isn't describing it right. Monohulls have a lovely pointed bow, it angles down into the water. Many (or most) cats seem to have this very vertical leading edge. It makes them look like a tank, or a large truck. From an outsiders point of view, it looks more like driving a huge vehicle rather than sailing a boat. I know, seriously trivial point, and I'm sure my impression will change in time.

The argument for an outboard hadn't occurred to me. Good advice.

Thanks,
MG
__________________
My blog, Sofa to Sailboat where you'll also find sample chapters from my upcoming novel.
MoxieGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 01:34   #22
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,458
Images: 69
Re: If you're going to dream....

The correct term is plumb bows. The reason a lot of boats have them, (mono's too) is because they have the most buoyancy for a given length of boat, and also the greatest waterline length.
__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 01:55   #23
Moderator
 
carstenb's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Copenhagen
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Fast 40.3
Posts: 4,942
Images: 1
Re: If you're going to dream....

Moxie,

Lots of good advice. when the time comes, check out the Danish Ocean Cruising Association
FTLF: Start (site is in danish, but you can write to them in english - no problem)

Then can get you a berth on a boat somewhere in the world for whatever period of time you have available. Generally costs something like 20 euros per day plus expenses - not bad and you can get your first real taste of living aboard and the cruising lifestyle.

BTW, you can always start a discussion on CF by claiming that a multi is superior to a mono (or vice versa) -- we are an opinionated lot (although I am not - I happen to be broad-minded and understanding of all other opinions. I will say, though, that those people who claim to know it all can rally p*ss off those of us that do know it all)

Welcome aboard
__________________
I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted - Elmore Leonard
carstenb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 06:53   #24
Registered User
 
tomfl's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Florida
Boat: Seawind 1000xl
Posts: 1,959
Images: 10
Re: If you're going to dream....

Quote:
Originally Posted by carstenb View Post
SNIP

Then can get you a berth on a boat somewhere in the world for whatever period of time you have available. Generally costs something like 20 euros per day plus expenses - not bad and you can get your first real taste of living aboard and the cruising lifestyle.

SNIP
There are lots of sites matching up boats and crews, some charge some do not. CF has a forum for this to mention one. There are several facebook pages that do this. Many are free services, some charge a fee. I would point out that most places have a near by yacht club(s). Most offer basic sailing lessons and often have an informal method of getting crews on a boat, something like a cork board where you can thumb tack a 3X5 card with particulars.

My experience has been that there are a lot more folks with boats looking for crew than crew looking for boats. Often times you can get a day sail by simply buying the owner a pizza or a six pack, or just ask.

The reason I mention this is many folks have the wrong idea about sailing. It can be wet, cold, bumpy, scary, and at worst life threatening. On the other hand it can be great fun. The best way to find out if sailing is for you is get on a boat. And the best way to research which boat is best for you is get on a lot of boats.
__________________
tomfl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 17:00   #25
Registered User
 
MoxieGirl's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 78
Re: If you're going to dream....

Thanks for the advice Tom, I shall do just that.

MG
__________________
MoxieGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 17:52   #26
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Re: If you're going to dream....

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoxieGirl View Post
The Miss - LOVE your website! The site is VERY well done, artistic and informative. And the boat is simply amazing! You are going to have a fantastic time!

Have taken deckofficers advice and started reading up on the Catanas (also the Seawind mentioned on your sight). They are very nice boats. Have so far been researching the Antares, so it seems I'm thinking along the same lines.

Just my very 'early days' impression here. I've read a number of blogs from both monohull and multihull liveaboards. It's almost, if you were to compare it with camping, like the monohull couples have grabbed a couple backpacks with tents and supplies and headed off into the woods to camp. Whereas the multihulls have loaded up the camper, hitched it to the family car before heading to the woods.

Both styles of camping (or sailing) has an appeal, and neither is right/wrong, better/worse, just different. I like the idea of minimal living and not needing a lot of money (one couple said they budgeted about $120 a week for food and fuel). But I also adore catamarans. Their stability, comfort (cause, in truth, I like my comfort), roominess, safety and I'm constantly amazed at how small the hulls look from the outside, but how much fits in them on the inside! I think some tardis magic is going on there, to be honest.

MG
Aloha Moxie,

This seems a very strange analogy to me. Once you've been aboard a few monos and multis I'd like to see if your opinion is the same. Please let us know. Very curious.

kindest regards,

John
__________________
John
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 18:22   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: vancouver, canada
Boat: hunter 31
Posts: 609
Re: If you're going to dream....

Welcome, The heeling, or leaning, on monohulls is not the cause of seasickness, and since both monos and cats have high roll stability underway, I would be hard pressed to think either is much better for seasickness than the other. Laypersons often "choose" cats due to the near absence of heeling, but thats a little like choosing a car based on it having tires you like. There are some good reasons you may have for choosing a catamaran, but keep an open mind. There are some real advantages to monohulls, not the least of which is the cost and availability of slips.
Good luck on your dream, but keep posting, we don't need you to have a boat to update us on your progress, or ask questions.
Cheers,
David on "Morgan."
__________________
shorebird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 18:40   #28
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Albany Ga.
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 17,068
I spent a week on a live aboard Cat scuba diving, she is a large Engine driven Cat, not a sail Cat. It and I assume all Cats have an unusual sort of a shuffle type of motion in any kind of sea as opposed to a monohull motion which is smoother and less jerky than the Cat's. Just different is all, no better or worse, just different Oh, it's name is Aqua Cat
__________________
a64pilot is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 03:03   #29
Registered User
 
MoxieGirl's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 78
Re: If you're going to dream....

John, I will do just that. Evaluate both and report back.

David, good advice. At this point, I just can't wait to get 'a boat', any boat. A dingy will do. The school I'm looking at offers weekend and full-week sailing trips. This sounds like a great way to learn to sail and to see what it's like living aboard. This is all on a very nice monohull, so should give me a good introduction to them. Good point about the price and availability btw, that's an important consideration.

Cheers, MG
__________________
MoxieGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 10:01   #30
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Pacific NW
Boat: Hedley Nicol Vagabond MK2, 37'
Posts: 980
Re: If you're going to dream....

Good luck MG! My 2 cents would suggest you also check out trimarans. The cruising variety are priced much lower than cats and sometimes monos giving you a lot of boat for the money.

Multihulls don't have the pendulum rolling of monos caused by the ballast keel and single hull making them more stable downwind in a sea. They also roll less at anchor. The main thing is to be sailing, having any decent boat, mono or multi beats just dreaming.
__________________

__________________
Cavalier MK2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A cheep way to build you own dream sailboat! jegenia Construction, Maintenance & Refit 15 28-10-2012 04:01
Thinking of a dream machine. xymotic Construction, Maintenance & Refit 8 15-07-2012 22:13



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:06.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.