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Old 02-07-2008, 01:23   #1
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Exclamation I have an improtant question for yall

I noticed that yall are often times buying a boat that is 10-20 years old I always thought that a boat over 10 was an unneccesary risk is this true or do i need to adjust my thinking?
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Old 02-07-2008, 14:53   #2
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I noticed that yall are often times buying a boat that is 10-20 years old I always thought that a boat over 10 was an unneccesary risk is this true or do i need to adjust my thinking?
If you had the chance to buy a hundred year old wooden boat, with all its good and bad points, would you?

I ask this because you can quickly see how it's the condition, not the age which is primary determinant. A well cared for older boat is similar to a house or car (with the exception that they don't appreciate well). Properly done and maintained, they will last near forever, barring exceptional circumstances. But you will eventually replace just about everything. Poorly built or maintained, it doesn't really matter what you buy it for as it will suck you dry.

That said the early depreciation creates a window of potential value, as does the next big hump when more expensive things need to be replaced. Typically that is around the 20 year mark. But just because it is that age doesn't make it a value. That is where knowledge of the market, realistic understanding of costs which will be incurred, and skill in repair/replacing or at least over seeing a project will come in handy.
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Old 02-07-2008, 15:10   #3
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Otter, a boat does not have a life span in the same sense that a car does. It can be compared to a home. There is depreciation, then at a certain point, there can be appreciation (Yes, it can happen). As Maren stated, the condition of the vessel is more of a consideration than the age. Although insurance costs, or availability will be affected by the age, the quality of the vessel may not. You have to take other factors into consideration such as the intended use of the vessel. A boat purchased for charter use will be easier, and less expensive to insure if it is newer, and a well known design, and fiberglass, while an old wooden boat may not be easy to insure, and will require specialized skills to maintain, but may fit your personal needs better.
Design improvement is also a factor. If you compare the performance of a 20 year old design, to that of a new, or more recent design, you will likely get more performance from the newer boat.
First step would be to clearly identify the use you intend for the boat, along with your ability to sail it. Once you have done this, you can start to look at different designs, and different ages of boats.
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Old 02-07-2008, 15:36   #4
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I think the 10 year old thing is mostly psychological. That doesn't mean it's irrelevant in pricing. After 10 years depreciation has run it’s course and, as Maren says, it’s all about condition. Of course, it’s always all about condition. But a less than 10 year old boat is less likely to need new standing rigging, chain plates, rewiring, engine overhaul, etc. A 20 year old boat is more likely to need things like that, but not if it’s been well maintained and upgraded. FWIW, a few years ago when we were cruising the Caribbean, most of the liveaboard cruising boats were more than 10 years old; frequently they were 20+ (ours was 16); and most of them were in very good condition and had significant modern upgrades.
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Old 02-07-2008, 15:49   #5
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Yep... start adjusting the thinking.

There are boats out there, still in use, that have much outlived their original owners and look beautiful and sail well.
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Old 02-07-2008, 16:04   #6
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There are no scientific statistics available for serious cruising sailboats. But, an informal survey conducted in 2006 during Regatta in George Town, Bahamas (sort of Bike Week for cruisers) revealed that the "average" cruising sailboat was a 39' monohull built in 1984; go here:

BoatUS Cruising Logs
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Old 02-07-2008, 16:08   #7
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Go to Nantucket in August and see the Oyster Classic. Sailboats you would...live for. Many are 80 or 90 y.o. and though they're rich boy toys, they have character and value that makes my 'only' 30 y.o. Morgan look... like a good old boat, but its reliable, safe and not begining to feel worn yet.
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Old 02-07-2008, 21:54   #8
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Thanks guys, I was wondering what wouyld be a good boat for single handed sailing.
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Old 02-07-2008, 23:19   #9
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Otter, this being a seperate question all together, may I suggest you read through the threads already here, that discuss single handed sailing. I think you will find answers to just about every question you could come up with on the subject, just in what is currently posted.
This too, is a matter of gaining experience. Only you can define what makes a good boat for you to single hand, however, the information here way well help you get started in your search.
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:45   #10
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thanks Kai didn't think of that
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Old 03-07-2008, 07:08   #11
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Lil Otter, where do you want to go, who and what do you want to take with you, do you want to sail fast, and what is your budget? People have been very happy and safe in small, (30 feet or less, even,) well built monohulls on world cruises, for example, and a 'good old boat' needen't cost an arm and a leg. A well-built old fashioned longish keel boat like Used Boat Review would be good, for example, if your budget isn't very high.

Check out Good Old Boat - Welcome to Good Old Boat Magazine
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Old 03-07-2008, 07:50   #12
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Big cay my budget is up to $350,000 any suggestions would be nice.
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Old 03-07-2008, 07:56   #13
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$350k gets you...

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Big cay my budget is up to $350,000 any suggestions would be nice.
Since you're posting on the multihull thread, check out this:

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/cache/searchResults.jsp?ps=50&ic=true&slim=yw&type=(Sail )+Multi-hull&Ns=PAll_sortPrice|1&seo=2&sm=3&obp=true&cit=t rue&luom=126&currencyid=100&No=750
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