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Old 18-03-2009, 08:51   #31
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I'm surprised

nobody has mentioned:

"MULTIHULL SEAMANSHIP" by Gavin le Sueur
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Old 18-03-2009, 09:48   #32
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Drew,
I learned to sail in Hawaii on a Searunner 31. The nice thing about Hawaii is that there are a lot of variable conditions. In the lee of the islands there are generally light day breezes and in the channels considerably stronger winds - 35kts & 8/10' seas. It made it possible to get a taste of heavier conditions while having calm conditions nearby.

The Searunners are great designs and given that your boat is in fine condtion, it would be up to it. From my time sailing in the Puget Sound it seems like it is really calm or blowing like snot.
I would make a plan to go out when there are small craft advisories with maybe 4 or 5 good sailors on the boat with the idea of experimenting in those conditions even for just a couple of hours. Have the boat set up right with good comms, sails, food, etc. A lee shore is the biggest concern.
Searunners sail well with just a small headsail. In 35/40 kts maybe a double reefed main and staysail or storm staysail.
When I left Maui in those just those conditions for the Sound area we ended up using a double reefed main and staysail close hauled (12' seas) after a while it seemed we needed a little more horsepower so I ran up the storm stays'l out on the forestay. The boat was pointing better with comfortable speed of 7/8 kts. As a side note, we were sailing comfortably, able to cook regular meals etc. That's why I'm a fan of the Searunner design.
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Old 18-03-2009, 11:06   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heikki View Post
I now wonder if I and Nick have the same edition? I have the 6th edition and it sure still has an example of a wooden boat breaking apart
[...]
I have not read the Dashew books. They are most likely worth of studying. The section covering storm tactics there may be much more suited to modern designs. It might be a good idea to follow Nick's recommendation here.
I checked: I have the 7th edition Dutch translation. It has a preface by Peter Blake written in 1991 and a Part 2 written after Coles died. Stories are written between 1946 and 1990.

It's important to know that the wooden yachts sailed in part 1 of the book are much more vulnerable than todays fiberglass or metal hulls. Part 1 is nice reading but only part 2 is really useful.

The Dashew book skips the old stuff completely.

Quote:
However, when it comes to pysical capsize related characteristics, I do not think much has changed. Laws of physics and waves pretty much remain the same. Most production yachts of today have a wide beam, relatively low displacement, failry high freeboard, small lateral keel idea, maybe even a high aspect ratio keel, and definitely a spade rudder.
You definitely need to get that Dashew book now ;-) It will explain why high freeboard is a safety feature and why fin-keels and spade rudders are better for everything except being aground. Even high superstructures like cabin or pilothouse help! In short, two reasons: the most dangerous situation is beam-to a big breaking wave. Other situations ultimately lead to this final one. First, during knock-down these surfaces counter the movement when they hit the water and stop the capsize (countering the momentum). This is why they must be so strong with storm-shutters etc. Immediately after, the wave isn't gone, you're on it, or it's on you. Now you need those surfaces to provide lift to start side-skidding off the wave. The rudder and keel will counter that and try to capsize the boat. If you side-skid good enough, you lessen the impact from the wave (de-power it's capsizing force just like luffing a sail) and improve the chance that the wave passes under you without rolling upside down. The book shows all that incl. aerial photo-series from rescue choppers etc.

Another example of techniques that didn't work with old designs: actively steering downwind, avoiding the big breaking crests.

Anyone sailing offshore should read this or a similar book as it widens your choice of options and has stories on all difficult areas in the world not just the ones around England.

cheers,
Nick.
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Old 18-03-2009, 14:41   #34
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Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
You definitely need to get that Dashew book now ;-) It will explain why high freeboard is a safety feature and why fin-keels and spade rudders are better for everything except being aground. cheers,
Nick.
Thanks Nick. Very interesting. I havent read that, or seen those thoughts before.


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Old 18-03-2009, 15:56   #35
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Great lessons learned from your ferry trip:1) never assume the weather will be like it is when you depart or go to bed. 2) Plan your trip with significant extra daylight time for arrival (once you make some trips you can determine what your real anchor up-to-anchor down average knots are, then use no more than 80% of that) 3) consider alternative stops ahead of time, you could probably do fine in 35-40 knots on a reach or down wind with a deep reef; but if you are trying to go into it and darkness is a couple of hours away? 4) always be thinking of contingency plans. (not sure how many times I was glad I took a compass bearing after anchoring in case I got blown out of an anchorage)
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Old 18-03-2009, 17:03   #36
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Thanks Nick. Very interesting. I havent read that, or seen those thoughts before.
But all architects know! I first learned this when I planned to have a boat built in Holland. I wanted an aft cockpit with low freeboard... the guy spent an hour on why freeboards are higher now etc.

cheers,
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Old 19-03-2009, 19:20   #37
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Your right: many don't have the horsepower....

Quote:
Originally Posted by catty View Post
Mark, there is not that many cats out there with enough HP to overcome their windage in the nasty stuff.

Have you ever set a para anchor? or better still tried to retrieve one?. You don't prefer the drogue to a para anchor as Chamberlan is Quoted on preferring?. This is the multi forum section isn't it?
or would need substantial speed to keep the bow into the wind. The high windage keeps forcing the bow to the side.

I have learned that, with catamarans
  • if you have one steerable outboard, kick the outboard a bit to one side. You will be able to keep the bow in the wind with much less horsepower and with better feel. Experiment.
  • if you have 2 engines, play with the individual throttles. More on one engine than the other will give a substantial turning moment, overcoming the high windage.
Regarding sea anchors, retrieval is a bit easier with a multihull because it is easier to get off to the side. As soon as one leg of the bridle is released, the boat shears well away, allowing an wide aproach to the pick-up buoy. Ofcourse, this depends on the weather.

I have no experience with drogues.
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