Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 13-04-2008, 11:11   #1
Registered User
 
Octopus's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Isle of Arran, UK
Boat: Lagoon 420 - Hull 52
Posts: 208
Hauling a Cat the Old-fashioned Way

We had planned to sell our Lagoon 420 after our sailing sabbatical comes to an end, but are now considering keeping her to sail in our local waters in the Western Islands of Scotland. There are no haulout facilities near us and it would be less costly and more convenient if we were to keep her on a local mooring during the summer and haul her out on the hard of the local yacht club during the winter. The yacht club lift is too narrow and there are no cranes big enough to lift her on the island. The cost of getting a crane shipped to the island for the lift would be prohibitive.

Years ago, my father used to haul his old wooden mono-hull up a slip on a cradle. The cradle laid on rollers and suprisingly little effort was required to haul the boat up the slip. It was a slow and smooth operation. I am wondering whether the same technique can be used to haul our catamaran, but am concerned about the strain on the hull and the weight distribution.

Lagoon catamarans are launched at Les Sables D'Olonne, by being placed on a slip with wooden blocks under the keel (see photo) and allowing the tide to launch her, so clearly they have faith in the strength of the keels and hulls to withstand the strain of this form of passive launching. A more active form of launching/hauling might place a greater strain on the keels. The keels are quite short (see drawing) and the balance looks precarious.

The concrete slip at the local yacht club is suitable for the purpose and, if the keels are strong enough, long enough and the balance OK, then the cradle needs to be nothing more than two girders, one under each keel to spread the load along the bottom of the keel. The girders would roll on wooden rollers (fence posts). We have 3m (10ft) tidal ranges, so this can be used to advantage.

Has anyone any experience of hauling and launching catamarans in this fashion or any other advice or comments?

Chris
Octopus, L420
Jolly Harbour, Antigua
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Balancing act.jpg
Views:	168
Size:	14.5 KB
ID:	3270   Click image for larger version

Name:	32.jpeg
Views:	126
Size:	48.2 KB
ID:	3271  

__________________

__________________
Chris, Beth and Clan
Octopus, Lagoon 420 Hybrid
Isle of Arran, Scotland
Octopus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2008, 12:15   #2
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nevada City. CA
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 3,745
Images: 9
Seems to me that if you could get a hold of an old trailer that was strong enough to for the weight of the cat you could build a cradle on the trailer that would support the cat where she needs to be supported and then back the trailer down to the edge of the water. Chock the wheels. disconnect the trailer from the vehicle. Build a strong wheel to attach to the tongue of the trailer, attach a rope or chain from the trailer to the tow vehicle. Allow the trailer to roll under water until you can haul the cat up on the cradle/trailer then from there you just need to haul the trailer out of the water reblock it and then hook it back up to the tow vehicle and tow the cat where you wna tit to go. I do this with my lake sailor that draws 4' and weighs 2200lbs. The only thing that I would be worried about would be the bearings b/c I don't do it in salt water. A good fresh water risne would probably let you get away with repacking the bearings once a year. and then position the trailer on the ramp
__________________

__________________
Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2008, 12:34   #3
Registered User
 
Octopus's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Isle of Arran, UK
Boat: Lagoon 420 - Hull 52
Posts: 208
Hauling using Custom-made Trailer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
Seems to me that if you could get a hold of an old trailer that was strong enough to for the weight of the cat you could build a cradle on the trailer that would support the cat where she needs to be supported and then back the trailer down to the edge of the water....
Charlie

I am sure you are right, I could do it this way. Lagoon 420s are designed to be lifted longditudinally rather than transversely (across the hulls) to avoid compression loads on the bridgedeck, so it would be quite possible to build a trailer to slip betwen the hulls and arrange supports that take the load at the recommended places under the bridgedeck. This would be great for transporting the boat over a distance, but I was thinking it might be overkill for shifting it up a slip and into a parking place.

Interestingly my father investigated three methods for hauling his boat. The first was a sledge-cradle on rails, but the frictional resistance made it hard work hauling the boat up the slip. The second was a custom-made trailer, but the bearings were a problem and the trailer frame twisted, finally he tried a simple cradle on rollers, which worked like a dream. He got the idea from watching Southcoast fishermen hauling their boats up a shingle beach. I've not heard of it being used elsewhere.

Chris
__________________
Chris, Beth and Clan
Octopus, Lagoon 420 Hybrid
Isle of Arran, Scotland
Octopus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2008, 12:56   #4
Registered User
 
Nordic cat's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Denmark
Boat: FP Tobago 35
Posts: 721
I think your 2 girders on rollers will work just fine. On the Brittany coast, they store their boat for winter standing on the keels.

I have a FP Tobago with mini keels, and I just place a couple of wooden blocks under each keel when storing for winter. In fact there is a 30-40 mm hole at the aft end of each keel, that I was told was used for attaching hauling ropes to.

The boat should be much stronger than the loads you are talking about. TIf she starts settling on the stern, then chock up the hulls close to the rudders.

Regards

Alan
__________________
Nordic cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2008, 13:43   #5
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Done all the time on the Rio Dulce. Have a look at
Voyages of Sea Trek: Haul Out on the Rio Dulce
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-04-2008, 10:41   #6
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Out there doin' it
Boat: 47' Olympic Adventure
Posts: 2,636
Might be overkill - pictures here: Haulout
__________________
Lodesman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 14-04-2008, 16:14   #7
Sponsoring Vendor

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Gulf Coast FL
Boat: Corinthian 41 Tri #12
Posts: 203
Interesting this should come up now. I have been searching the net trying to locate a description on building such a system for myself. Does someone have a link to a clear description of building such a system or recommend some other source I could read or review.

Thanks,

Pat
Pat Ross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-04-2008, 16:49   #8
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
I hate to mention it, but what about just using the tide and doing it the *really* old fashioned way?

I have a slow leak on a seal on my saildrive and I'm going to skip the marina in favor of drying out at low tide to change it.

I can see doing bottom paint and stuff on the hard, but for smaller stuff, you can always use those tides in your favor.
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 22:24   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Vancouver, Can.
Boat: Woods 40' catamaran
Posts: 277
I've hauled out my cat on a railway. I *like* marine railways. No travelift straps to slip or break. The boat just sits there on the cradle and the donkey engine pulls it up the rails. I'd contact Lagoon if you like, but since they launch them this way, clearly the keels can take the weight and balance doesn't seem to be an issue. Hauling it in a cradle won't impose any significantly higher stresses.

I've also beached my boat in the mud to install a thru hull at low tide. Notes to people that might think of doing this your self:

- have Very FAST hardener for your epoxy and a heat gun if you need to seal off the core (I was on a little mud island with no power; had to improvise a camping stove and a tinfoil oven to cure the epoxy before the tide came in...

- make sure your caulking tube is new, not old and hard

- have a helper to go inside the hull and tighten the seacock while you hold the thru hull on the inside. I was alone so jammed a big screwdriver in the thru hull on the outside and braced it against the hull.

- have a piece of plywood to stand on if you're working in the mud; better yet, pick a sandy beach!
__________________
Evan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 22:59   #10
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
You may want to think twice about scraping dead sea creatures and toxic copper paint onto someones pristine beach. I know for a fact you could never get away with this in California. I'm sure you would not want to run afoul of the pollution regulations where you live.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2008, 00:13   #11
Registered User
 
Little Otter's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Cumming, GA
Boat: Ranger 22, currently saving for a larger cruising boat
Posts: 527
Images: 3
octopus, i agree that if you had to you could build a trailer to haul your boat. my friend and i once took a tilt trailer for a 10' sailboat and used it for a model to build a larger version to haul his cat.
__________________
Sailing and exploration are necessary for life to endure
Little Otter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2008, 05:08   #12
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
You may want to think twice about scraping dead sea creatures and toxic copper paint onto someones pristine beach. I know for a fact you could never get away with this in California. I'm sure you would not want to run afoul of the pollution regulations where you live.
You have to pick the right spots, David. As long as you're not scraping off bottom paint (if you have hard, not ablative) and you are just returning sea creatures to the sea... what is the problem?

I have beached it 3 times now on this delivery, but finally hauled out due to the number of projects I had to do and the fact that I wanted a fresh new coat of bottom paint. I did this in 3 different states.

Of course, I did "mud beach" it in SC. That was no fun. I couldn't get anything done that time because I sunk about a foot into the mud and when pushing the boathook down to see how deep it was... there was no end I could feel from a low cat deck with a 20' extension pole. YIKES!

I didn't even try to step off into that stuff.
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2008, 06:05   #13
Registered User
 
Sonosailor's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Fredericton, NB, Canada in the summer and fall; Caribbean in winter and spring aboard Cat Tales.
Boat: FP Tobago 35 (and a H-21 SE)
Posts: 547
Images: 8
My FP Tobago 35 comes out of the water in rural New Brunswick, Canada on an old double-axle mobile home (premanufactured housing) trailer. With all the mobile home removed, we cut off the outside triangular flanges that supported the outside walls, and built a long, 4' tall box as long as the bridgedeck. The forward main bulkhead on the Tobago flares forward from the mast to the outboard sides of the hulls, and contacts the bottom of the boat up a complex curve under the anchor locker. I solved this problem by building a box with the right shape that would contact the underside and carry the load down to the trailer box. It has regular internal ribs that contacts the underside all along the bottom of the bulkhead, and carries the load down to the trailer box. The top and bottom of this box is covered with 50 mm styrofoam, and styrofoam is placed on top of the box under the rear main bulkhead. It works fine, and the boat and trailer is moved at least 300 metres to its storage spot, hauled by a truck. Once there, I jack it up so that some of the load is taken by the keels as well.

We took a lot of measurements before trying this, and the keels travel along 100-150 mm above the ground.
__________________
Sonosailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-05-2008, 09:16   #14
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
A friend hauled his PDQ 32 with a slightly modified two axle boat trailer and frames that tilted up to fit the factory reccommended support points. Slick, reuseable, and not too expensive. I have access to some old seaplane ramps, and have considered a floating box with big industrial equipment casters, and four truck inner tubes on top. When in position for storage, the tubes would be deflated to settle the cat on blocks. it could be launched and retrieved by a heavy SUV and a very long trailer tongue.
__________________

__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Which old cat? FerdinandMagellan Multihull Sailboats 17 17-12-2008 06:22
Any "old-fashioned" looking boats besides Tayana 37? coyotewrw Monohull Sailboats 30 07-08-2008 20:22
Hauling the race team to Jr. Bay Week Joli Fishing, Recreation & Fun 0 14-09-2006 07:18
Buffing/Waxing Topsides without hauling? ssullivan General Sailing Forum 26 26-04-2006 12:12
Sea Chase Cat, or similar large cat...? CSY Man Multihull Sailboats 1 08-11-2004 10:25



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 18:57.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.