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Old 04-01-2011, 20:02   #1
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Has Anyone Compared the Maine Cat 30 to the PDQ 32 ?

Both are considered high-quality catamarans and seem to be similarly priced.
Any opinions, good or bad?
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Old 06-01-2011, 00:19   #2
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They're quite different conceptually. The Maine Cat is an open bridge deck cat which looks to be setup for holiday cruising whilst the PDQ is designed as a long range cruiser for a live aboard couple.

Both are well built boats.

But to be honest, I think you're comparing apples to oranges. What's your intended use?
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Old 06-01-2011, 12:30   #3
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I'm looking for a coastal cruiser to use as a liveaboard. I was thinking the open bridgedeck of the Maine Cat might be okay for a temperate climate.
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:44   #4
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The best thing would be to get yourself aboard both and have a look. I think it'll quickly become clear which is more suitable as a live aboard.
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Old 07-01-2011, 21:15   #5
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Thanks! I think that answers my question.
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Old 16-01-2011, 14:11   #6
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Hi,

I spent 2 weeks aboard a Maincat 41 a couple of years ago. Great boat, fast, fun; but would not consider it a liveaboard. I would consider it more a day charter party boat. I found it a bit spartan for a liveaboard, but guess it could be fixed up with a bit more niceties. The all round curtains would not be acceptable for me as a liveaboard.

I think you will find the PDQ more suited to a liveaboard lifestyle.

Rick
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Old 16-01-2011, 15:57   #7
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Hi,

I spent 2 weeks aboard a Maincat 41 a couple of years ago. Great boat, fast, fun; but would not consider it a liveaboard. I would consider it more a day charter party boat. I found it a bit spartan for a liveaboard, but guess it could be fixed up with a bit more niceties. The all round curtains would not be acceptable for me as a liveaboard.

I think you will find the PDQ more suited to a liveaboard lifestyle.

Rick
What was the Maine Cat 41 missing to make it a live aboard? If I recall correctly they have a large galley, nice head, a couple of sizable bunks and a nice salon if you like the open bridgedeck concept. I guess it is missing the abundance of wood which gives her that homey feeling bnt would also detract from the performance.
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Old 16-01-2011, 16:24   #8
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For me it is the creature comforts.

Don't get me wrong, the Maine Cat is a more than adequate vessel. But there is a lot of bare fibreglass, the helm is in the middle of the salon, the forward bunk and the double bunk share a head, and the forward bunk needs to pass through the head to get to the galley or salon (so if the head is in use, anyone in the forward bunk is stuck there). The double bunk has the dagger blade housing as one of its walls (noise). While the galley is large enough for two to work there, it is down and I prefer up. The salon is large with a hardtop and side curtains, but for a liveaboard I would want fixed sides with ports. The rear deck is quite small due to the large salon.

Since it would be a liveaboard, most of the time will be at anchor, so I am willing to sacrifice performance for comfort. While it is not perfect either, a Lagoon 440 is more of a liveaboard (which we have spent a couple of weeks on also).

We are still looking for the best compromise with a purchase date of 2013.

When you see a boat that interests you, find a way to spend at least two weeks onboard. If the Maine Cat interests you, then I'd recommend a trip with Tracey Dell as he moves his 41 from New Jersey to Florida or back (gets you some sense of the liveability)

Rick
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Old 16-01-2011, 21:24   #9
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Our first cat was an open wing-deck with all round curtains/clears. Fantastic for parties and harbours, absolutely miserable for beating to weather even in the tropics. Everything ends up soaked, clears just don't cut the mustard. Seawind learnt this when you consider the first seawind 10's didn't have a hard top, after the first couple the hard top was introduced.
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Old 17-01-2011, 06:42   #10
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Our first cat was an open wing-deck with all round curtains/clears. Fantastic for parties and harbours, absolutely miserable for beating to weather even in the tropics. Everything ends up soaked, clears just don't cut the mustard. Seawind learnt this when you consider the first seawind 10's didn't have a hard top, after the first couple the hard top was introduced.
We just recently sold our Seawind 1000 with the soft top. We never had a problem with things getting soaked while beating. We found the advantages for tropical cruising were huge compared to the hardtop. Better visibility, lighter and much better ventilation. We regret having to sell our Seawind and realize it will be a chore finding another 1000 with a soft top. The newer 1000xl is a step up with the large opening windows but will always be out of our price range.
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Old 17-01-2011, 07:46   #11
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We just recently sold our Seawind 1000 with the soft top. We never had a problem with things getting soaked while beating. We found the advantages for tropical cruising were huge compared to the hardtop. Better visibility, lighter and much better ventilation. We regret having to sell our Seawind and realize it will be a chore finding another 1000 with a soft top. The newer 1000xl is a step up with the large opening windows but will always be out of our price range.
And the Mainecat has a hard top with clears that is even better than a soft top since you can walk on it but retains the advantages of the soft top. There have been at least two full time liveaboards with MC 41's who would disagree that 'everything gets soaked' going to windward or that they don't make good liveaboards.

Don't knock em until you've tried em.
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Old 22-01-2011, 14:39   #12
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I would agree that with the clears down that most water was kept out, but, at least on the Maine Cat 41, there seemed to be a channel formed on the deck that funnelled a stream of water into the clears and under them each time the bows were submerged...

Rick
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Old 22-01-2011, 15:02   #13
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So I am likely a bit off topic, but I think the message here is to try to get some time on any boat you intend to buy. And try it in the conditions you will be sailing in (especially if you intend to live-aboard)...

I was convinced beyond a doubt that a Lagoon 440 was my future boat, till I spent two weeks aboard. I had looked at them at boat shows and spent a weekend aboard, but when I spent two solid weeks on one I found issues that I am now trying to determine if I can change or live with...

Small issues can be come big issues once you live-aboard.

Try before you buy!

Rick
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