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Old 28-03-2010, 20:39   #1
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Corsair 37 or Dragonfly 35: Which Is Better for Blue Water Passage Making ?

I have settled on getting a trimaran, and have narrowed it down to either the Dragonfly 35 or the Corsair 37. Without taking price into consideration, what boat do you think is better, and why?
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Old 29-03-2010, 08:08   #2
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I will follow this thread

Without to have all numbers, the dragonfly is heavier and also have a diesel inboard. I like them both, and i will visit Denmark this summer for a test sail with the dragonfly 35.
Steeringwheel and layout looks very good on dragonfly IMO.

If you can live with a boat that you can┤t fold. Check contour 50 contour 50 B├ątar till salu
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Old 29-03-2010, 15:27   #3
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Slips

If you are planning on keeping the boat in a slip that requires you to fold the amas, the Dragonfly 35's amas fold back, making the boat longer, but painting it with antifouling paint is no problem. The Corsair 37's amas fold down, which would mean you would have to paint almost the entire ama with antifouling paint.

The Corsair is a faster, lighter boat, but by the time it would get loaded it might not have as big of a performance edge.

I myself would take the Dragonfly 35. How can you not like a tri that you can fit a sea kayak inside of each ama?
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Old 29-03-2010, 17:37   #4
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I will love to hear how your test sail on the Dragonfly 35 goes, freetime.

I really don't know too much about sailing at this point in time, but I plan on sailing solo around the world when I have more experience and knowledge (a very SLOW trip, I'm not trying to break any records). So the trimaran would just have me aboard, and I'll be able to travel light. Right now, I'm working on putting everything into place so I can 'unplug' for this trip (so I can do most things via internet and other tech).

Thoughts?
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Old 29-03-2010, 18:47   #5
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I will love to hear how your test sail on the Dragonfly 35 goes, freetime.

I really don't know too much about sailing at this point in time, but I plan on sailing solo around the world when I have more experience and knowledge (a very SLOW trip, I'm not trying to break any records). So the trimaran would just have me aboard, and I'll be able to travel light. Right now, I'm working on putting everything into place so I can 'unplug' for this trip (so I can do most things via internet and other tech).

Thoughts?
2003 Manzoli 40' Trimaran Segel B├ątar till salu - se.yachtworld.com=

Dont look at the link It started my head....

And some extra inspiriation turn up the volume...

The first link. I should buy that one today if i had the money, but i am also little crazy

Where do you live? What route do you plan....
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Old 29-03-2010, 19:09   #6
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Neither look like good cruisers to me as their payloads are limited, but you might see I'm a little biased as far as cruising tris are concerned. A Searunner is much cheaper and a good balance of storage capacity and speed. There is a great looking 40' in the Puget sound right now and looks like it's pretty much ready to go.
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Old 29-03-2010, 19:50   #7
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I have settled on getting a trimaran, and have narrowed it down to either the Dragonfly 35 or the Corsair 37. Without taking price into consideration, what boat do you think is better, and why?
I have been on a Dragonfly 1200 for a daysail, but only on an F24 or F27--not a Corsair 37.

I was extremely impressed with the quality of the Dragonfly, inside and out--and I am sure if we were to choose a trimaran, that is the one my wife would choose!

Marshall
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Old 30-03-2010, 05:37   #8
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If your heart is set on one of these 2. I would think accommodations if you are cruising. Can you stand upright? Is there a corner for solitude? Sometimes we want a small piece of the boat to read, or vent.........i2f
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Old 30-03-2010, 13:09   #9
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This boat is mainly for solo blue water passagemaking. Is the Dragonfly 1200 a big too big for this? The more I look at it, the more I like it!
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Old 01-04-2010, 13:26   #10
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What do you all think of the Dragonfly 1200? Does anyone know what the time is from placing an order to taking delivery?
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Old 01-04-2010, 18:21   #11
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What do you all think of the Dragonfly 1200? Does anyone know what the time is from placing an order to taking delivery?
Just mail the builder, they answer very fast.
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Old 01-04-2010, 23:29   #12
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This boat is mainly for solo blue water passagemaking. Is the Dragonfly 1200 a big too big for this? The more I look at it, the more I like it!
I single-hand my Dragonfly 1200. The only problem might be if tying up when the wind is strong. Anchoring is no problem, but approaching a dock or mooring might get a little tense if it is windy and there is nobody to help with the lines. I have owned a Dragonfly 920, 1000, and 1200 -- and there is not much difference in handling the larger boat. There is much more power but the systems are also sized larger, and with the power winches and anchor windlass the 1200 is actually easier to sail. Things also tend to happen at a slower pace in a larger, heavier boat - so an experienced sailor can anticipate things and react in time.

If you can afford it, the 35 is nice-- but the 1200 is much nicer, and certainly better if going offshore or cruising on an extended basis.

The C-37 would be a fast boat -- but don't underestimate the speed of the DF-35. I sailed one from Annapolis to NY (it had the racing rig) and it was very fast.
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Old 02-04-2010, 00:51   #13
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I have settled on getting a trimaran, and have narrowed it down to either the Dragonfly 35 or the Corsair 37. Without taking price into consideration, what boat do you think is better, and why?
"Without taking price into consideration"? If they were priced equal it would be a no-brainer. The DF35 is in another league in fit and finish and equipment. That's the one your wife will like, and if you cruise and entertain guests you will to. However, if what you want is a stripped out racing machine, you can get a C-37 in carbon fiber and that would be another consideration.
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:56   #14
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WhataWorld, you say your intended aim is blue water passagemaking - I am wondering why you would select a trimaran with folding amas as oppose to fixed amas?
-Most blue water cruisers do not spend much / only a minimal amount of time in marinas where the folding wings come into their own.
- Why go for a complex system which is, though surely well executed, a weak point of the design and difficult to attend to when you are hundred or thousand of miles from land!
It is my belief that a trimaran with fixed amas offers more safety for your intended use - and they also come cheaper.
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Old 02-04-2010, 12:44   #15
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WhataWorld, you say your intended aim is blue water passagemaking - I am wondering why you would select a trimaran with folding amas as oppose to fixed amas?
-Most blue water cruisers do not spend much / only a minimal amount of time in marinas where the folding wings come into their own.
- Why go for a complex system which is, though surely well executed, a weak point of the design and difficult to attend to when you are hundred or thousand of miles from land!
It is my belief that a trimaran with fixed amas offers more safety for your intended use - and they also come cheaper.
You make some good points. The folding mechanism does come at a price, in adding complexity and maintenance. The waterstays on a Dragonfly should be replaced on a scheduled basis every 5 years (2 years ago that cost about $2k, USD delivered price) and the folding rigging needs to be inspected regularly and replaced similar to other standing wire rigging -- about every 10+ years. I think if the owner is diligent about maintenance and inspections, and doesn't have critical maintenance work done by yard staff (unless present to oversee and/or inspect carefully before using) the risks of added complexity are minimal and manageable.

However, if the boat is kept in a slip or is hauled for winter, having a folding tri can get you a single-width spot in marinas that would turn away other multihulls completely, and at a monohull price. We can be hauled by a crane (we carry our own lifting bridle) or any travelift, in most any full-service marina. Being able to fold the boat saves me at least $2,500 annually in winter storage fees. Also, a voyaging boat might need an emergency haul-out. Our beam is 28 feet open, and 14 feet folded, or 21 feet half-folded. It would impose some significant storage and hauling problems if we had to be 28 feet wide all the time.

During the sailing season we prefer not to fold the boat -- we keep it opened 99% of the time on a mooring, and usually prefer open moorings or anchoring rather than marina slips when we cruise. It's nice to have options though.

Here's the boat being lifted.
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