Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-06-2006, 16:09   #1
Senior Cruiser
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Boat: 46' custom cat
Posts: 1,571
Images: 2
Anchor from Bow or Bridgedeck?

As I refit my cat I am coming to the stage where I have to decide whether to deploy the anchor from a roller on the crossarm or straight from the bridgedeck. Originally I had thought that the bow option would be better as the anchors and chain are more accessible. However I now sort of lean to the bridgedeck as this would take the strain off the crossarm and the weight of the anchors and chain off the bow. Any thoughts/rants/biased opinions on this matter?
__________________

__________________
mikereed100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 17:41   #2
Registered User
 
ScratchBC's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: NYC
Boat: Oday 28
Posts: 8
I once crewed on a a fountian Pajor Bahia (46' sailing cat)

On that boat there was a lazeret on the bridgedeck where the anchor, winch, and chain was stowed. The anchor was a danforce and had all chain. We hooked a bridal attached to the bows to the chain, such that all of the tension was on the bridal. That set up worked great! The line was always way infront of the boat thanks to the bridal, but we allways had the chain and winch hidden and out of the way.

Hope that helped.

-Alex
__________________

__________________
ScratchBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 17:43   #3
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,138
I'm a monohull sailor so the following is based only on observation. The problem with bridge deck deployment is that in poor conditions (very rough) or where the wind is against the current the rode can quickly go under one of the hulls when anchoring. I've seen this happen with both nylon and all chain and it happens before you can go forward to put the bridle on. The same thing can happen when weighing anchor if the coordination between the helmsperson and the "anchorer" is a bit off. Also if , heavens forbid, you ever get hung up on something, your rode will be between the hulls and again susceptible to going against or under one of the hulls instead of off the bow. OK, you catamaran sailors who have a bridge deck deployed anchors, what's been your experience?
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 03:37   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
As I envision your situation:
~ the bridgedeck stops short of the bows, with a gap (perhaps a trampoline) between it and the forward beam (crossarm).

You may deploy (launch) your anchor from a centrally located (on the fwd beam) roller, but never secure it there. Catamarans should always use a bridle.

A bridle is a wye-shaped rope, attached at the single end to the anchor rode, and at each ama bow on the double ends. The main rode is then secured amidships (to bridgedeck or mast), such that it is normally “slack”. The bridle takes the normal loading, and may be adjusted asymmetrically to prevent skating or horsing.

On some catamarans, where there is a solid foredeck (notably Privilege and Prout), the bridle is slightly less critical, though still useful in preventing “horsing”.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 05:55   #5
cruiser

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: No longer post here
Boat: Catalac Catamaran
Posts: 2,462
Gord,

I'm trying to envision your bridle configuration. If the hulls take the normal loading via the bridle, why extend the rode to the mast?

Rick in Florida
__________________
Tropic Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 06:23   #6
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
Extend the rode to a strongback (mast, nacelle, bridgdeck, etc), for the same purposes as we do on a monohull - ultimate rode connection.
The Bridle takes the normal anchoring loads, but the rode must still be independently connected to the boat.
BTW - I prefer the bridle or smaller diameter than the rode.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 07:25   #7
Registered User
 
henryv's Avatar

Join Date: May 2004
Location: Ontario
Boat: PDQ32 & FP Helia 44 on order
Posts: 242
anchor location

On my PDQ32 the anchors are deployed from the bows. On my Leopard the anchor is deployed from the bridge deck. Either way you need a bridle in place once the anchor is set.
Deployment from the bows works a little better if you are setting two anchors. Deployment from the bridge deck puts the chain well back between the hulls so you need to take care during setting not to get the boat pulling off to one side as the chain will contact the hulls.
I think both options have some advantages but in the end it is probably more an issue of where things tend to fit in better - that said I probably prefer the set up with an anchor on each bow.
__________________
henryv
henryv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 07:39   #8
cruiser

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: No longer post here
Boat: Catalac Catamaran
Posts: 2,462
I am curious as to what people are using for anchoring setups on cats. Hurricane season is officially upon us and it's only natural to revisit the subject.

Rick in Florida
__________________
Tropic Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 10:12   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 341
Send a message via Skype™ to gosstyla
I have no experience with a bridge deck setup but during the design stage of my current boat I seriously considered that arrangement. Ultimately I went with rollers on the bow because of the likelyhood of the bridle and rode sailing over the hulls when deploying from the bridge deck.

My "first down" anchor is a Fortress Fx-55 with 30ft of chain connected to the 66lb Bruce main anchor.
__________________
gosstyla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 11:14   #10
Senior Cruiser
 
colemj's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Presently on US East Coast
Boat: Manta 40 "Reach"
Posts: 10,049
Images: 12
I chartered a cat with the anchoring system at the bridgedeck. You still attach a bridle to each hull, though. I found the problem mentioned above where the boat would bear off while dropping anchor before attaching the bridle and the chain would come up tight underneath and against a hull. If it is windy, it can come up very tight and "saw" against the hull. Also, the windlass is now taking the full load with no way to easily release it or put on a stopper. It had the added disadvantage of not being able to work on the anchor system easily.

Mark
__________________
colemj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 12:00   #11
Registered User
 
markpj23's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Black Hills, SD
Boat: Now Boatless
Posts: 1,148
Images: 47
FWIW, another option may be what I saw on a cat at the Oakland Strictly Sail show this year - unfortunately I do not remember the manufacturer of the cat, but it was in the mid-30ft range.

A single anchor located on-centerline on the cross-brace in a traditional roller housing. The chain ran back to the windlass located in a bridge deck nacelle. Some basic disadvantages I saw was that the chain ran back to the windlass in an open tray vice a closed or partially covered conduit. I could envision the chain jumping around dangerously during a free-fall deployment, but I guess if you used a reversing windlass that issue could be avoided. Not sure how you'd mitigate the noise of that chain sliding all that way through the tray though - or underway as you hobby-horse to windward...

Also I don't remember if the chain went over the roller through a closed chock, but if it wasn't closed that would be horrible, since any side pull would yank the chain out of the tray on its way to making a straight line back to the windlass.

I can see merits in this arrangement - if there was a reliable way to keep the chain in the tray. You would avoid the chain sliding under one of the hulls prior to getting the bridle on anyway.... And if side-pull did happen, you'd only slice off structure ABOVE the waterline ..

__________________
Mark
markpj23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2006, 12:05   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Boat: 46' custom cat
Posts: 1,571
Images: 2
Rick and Henry raise a good point echoed by Chuck Kantor in his "Cruising in Catamarans", that of the possibility of contact between the hull and the rode during deployment/retrieval. If the wind were up (katabatic winds of 40-50kts sustained are not uncommon in my area) it would take some fancy helmwork to keep the bows from falling off and contacting the rode while setting anchor.
On the other hand, severe vertical forces can be generated while trying to retrieve reluctant ground tackle. In cases such as this deployment from the crossarm places much strain on the spar itself as well as the rig through the forestay.
Deployment from the bows as Henry suggests makes good sense and solves both these problems. Unfortunately my bows have a "reverse rake" from mid-hull up which would make this difficult.
Probably end up deploying off the bow in deference to my gelcoat and just pay close attention when breaking out well set anchors. Thanks for all the replies.

Mike
__________________
mikereed100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2009, 09:01   #13
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
Re-reading this I realize no one mentioned the difficulty in attaching the bridle to the rode from a central bridge deck winch. I chartered a Moorings 4700 that had a handy hatch to reach the rode, but it was still awkward.

In shallow water on my PDQ (with a windlass on the stbd bow, a 30' chain to 170' 3-strand 9/16" rope) I frequently can set a bridal with a single line from the other bow, attached to the chain rode with a locking chain hook then let out more rode to equalize the sides. In deeper water I tie the single line from the other bow to the rope section of the rode with rolling hitches, good enough to hold and still easy to untie. If there is going to be some action with current and wind, I use a clove hitch (which weakens the rode. All this I can do singlehanded. The 4700 took three people.
__________________

__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Opinions on Cruising Sailboat? leesureman Monohull Sailboats 32 05-07-2009 19:23



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:18.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.