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Old 24-03-2006, 09:41   #1
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Additional headsail for catamaran

We're planning to take delivery of a new Lagoon 420 in July, 2007. We will sail the boat in the Med. and Carib. for 8 - 10 months before putting it into charter service in the BVI.

Obviously, the boat comes with a mainsail and a jib. I believe Lagoon will offer an optional spinnaker or some sort of 'downwind' headsail.

I'd be interested in your comments on the various headsails that are used on catamarans. I've heard of gennakers, screechers, and probably other names for them, but I don't have any appreciation of the differences.

Considering that we will be doing the ARC crossing, a good downwind sail will be helpful. What are your thoughts?

Thanks,

Charlie
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Old 24-03-2006, 14:18   #2
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Most people reckon that folding props are a better long term investment, but if you are tradewinding, being able to set twin headsails, a cruising chute, or spinnaker is a definite bonus.
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Old 25-03-2006, 00:07   #3
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I second Talbot's suggestion of folding props. I don't have them - as my boat is in charter at the moment - but I've sailed an identical boat fitted with them and it does make a big difference.

If you do go for a downwind sail I suggest a gennaker on a continuous line furler. Least amount of hassle for most benefit.
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Old 25-03-2006, 00:12   #4
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WOW!!!

What a huge photo. Takes up almost the whole page.

Very nice Mike!!
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Old 25-03-2006, 10:10   #5
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The Lagoon 420 is the new electric powered boat. The props are used to charge the batteries while sailing so I dont think folding props are a good option.
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Old 26-03-2006, 02:31   #6
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Photo

Apologies about the size of the photo to anyone not on broadband.... Failed to realise I was only viewing it at 50% of the size before I posted.

Now fixed.
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Old 26-03-2006, 06:39   #7
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laser,

You're right, folding props are not an option.

So far I hear one vote for a gennaker. What's the difference between that and a screacher (sp?) of a traditional spinnaker?

That is a huge photo, but a nice pic anyway. Are you on a catamaran?

Charlie
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Old 26-03-2006, 07:15   #8
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I second Mike's suggestion for a gennaker/asymetric on a continuous line furler. We just bought a Doyle UPS sail and Facnor code 0 furler for our boat, although the farthest we have sailed with it so far is about 6 inches . A catamaran makes an ideal platform for these types of sails because the sail can be designed somewhat flatter for sailing with the wind above the beam while also allowing deeper sailing angles by pulling the tack over to the windward hull (built in spinnaker pole). Ours is tacked to a bridle system that is attached to the hulls. A control line allows us to adjust the tack of the sail. I believe the fullness and shape of the sail differentiates gennakers, screechers asymetrics and spinnakers (listed flattest to fullest).

I can't figure out how to post a picture inside a message, but you can see our sail here:

http://cruisersforum.com/photopost//...t=7&thecat=500

Mark
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Old 26-03-2006, 07:50   #9
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Gennaker is just a lot easier for a single person to deploy and pull in. With a sock on a second halyard you can snuff the sail and bring it down with ease.
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Old 26-03-2006, 10:48   #10
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Speaking from theory of operation on a cat, rather than experience (I would be pleased to be corrected) the gennaker (an asymetric sail) tack is on the center line, with the leech/clew off to leeward - so it acts a bit like a lightweight Genoa. You have the problem of the main shadowing the Gennaker. Hence, people sometimes pull the tack over to windward. Then it acts more like an inefficient.....

....spinnaker. On a cat, the spinnaker (a symetrical sail) is rigged symetrically, with a clew from each hull. Hence for direct down-wind sailing you would have 'half on each side of the center line' acting like a giant bag (appologise to spinnaker makers). It can be adjusted by the sheets to the two hulls to get different balances, for when you are not directly down wind. For the sailing angles it is designed for, the spinnaker is MUCH more efficient than the gennaker, and not difficult to handle on a cat, with a sock.

I plan to have a permanently mounted, furling, screecher for winds up to about 150 degrees, and a spinnaker for direct downwind work.

comments welcomed.
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Old 27-03-2006, 07:40   #11
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additional headsail

I find the assymetrical is much more versatile and better suited for a cat since you generally don't sail dead down wind. Depending on wind angle you can secure the tack to either hull or to a bridle allowing it to be positioned anywhere between hulls.
I do own a symmetrical spinnaker but it no longer get used.
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Old 27-03-2006, 12:52   #12
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For direct downwind I use gennaker out one side, genoa the other and drop the main. I'm not certain dead downwind is any quicker though than running 20 degrees off the wind.
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