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Old 11-05-2013, 01:56   #61
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

I must admit after re-reading this thread, I’ve spent quite some time on issues pretty far removed from what I first wanted to know, and as informative as that has been, many of these subjects have been covered elsewhere on these forums, some of them in great detail.

Perhaps let me try and be more articulate on my original intent, and ask that owners draw from their own experience and give a simple 1-10 rating of their boats on the points mentioned?

1. True Solo Sail Ability ( /10)
2. Heavy Weather Safety / Survivability / Comfort ( /10)
3. Carrying Capacity ( /10)
3. General Build Quality / Durability ( /10)
4. Ease of Maintenance ( /10)
5. Performance Both Under Sail and while Motoring ( /10)
6. Natural Ventilation / general livability ( /10)
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:41   #62
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

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Originally Posted by Fresh Salt View Post
I well understand the frustration endured by the knowledgeable, when confronted by the prattling on of a newbie over seemingly irrelevant issues. Separating those from valid issues is part of the exercise as far as I’m concerned and ulitimately a positive development.
Agreed. I only make this comment here because it was often made to me some years back, when I was where you are now. It took me some time to understand it.

That doesn't mean you're on a fruitless venture - not at all. I think it'll be great to hear how different cats rank in these catagories.

It's just that when you get to the end of the analysis, and it comes time actually acquire a boat, there comes the matters of availability, of actual price, of condition,etc. The limited availability of boats of specific makes, models, years, and condition very often becomes the key decision factor in the final purchase regardless of the analysis made.

Still, it is not a fruitless effort. Efforts to seek knowledge and understanding will always be worthwhile.
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Old 11-05-2013, 11:25   #63
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArtM View Post
.........when you get to the end of the analysis, .........The limited availability of boats of specific makes, models, years, and condition very often becomes the key decision factor in the final purchase regardless of the analysis made.
Still, it is not a fruitless effort. Efforts to seek knowledge and understanding will always be worthwhile.
IMHO it goes much beyond that. Your statememnt about limited availability is very true, and of those available, condition of the boat and equipment will be very variable, and thus colour the perception of the value of that boat.

Where the value of this analysis really is shown is not in the acceptance of the good stuff, but in the actual acceptance of some of the bad. You will have a much better idea up front on what might otherwise have soured you to the boat over time.
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Old 11-05-2013, 11:49   #64
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Fresh Salt,

I went back through a few pages thinking I saw what your budget is and cannot find it.

??


I (and I am sure others) would be delighted if you would, in the end, post your list of pros and cons for each of the boats you considered.

I am not in the market right now and know the boat I want I can never afford but I am still holding hope that one day I can do, at least for a little while, what I have always wanted to do before I die. The glimmer is still there but dimmer as time goes by.

The comment about inaccessibility of repair/maintenance items bring back memories in several boats I have owned or been acquainted with. First on my list of boats to strike off the list would be those. But how to find out about them quickly and easily? If at all...............

I am inspired by thoughtful people like you and what they think.
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Old 11-05-2013, 14:10   #65
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fresh Salt View Post
I must admit after re-reading this thread, I’ve spent quite some time on issues pretty far removed from what I first wanted to know, and as informative as that has been, many of these subjects have been covered elsewhere on these forums, some of them in great detail.

Perhaps let me try and be more articulate on my original intent, and ask that owners draw from their own experience and give a simple 1-10 rating of their boats on the points mentioned?

1. True Solo Sail Ability ( /10)
2. Heavy Weather Safety / Survivability / Comfort ( /10)
3. Carrying Capacity ( /10)
3. General Build Quality / Durability ( /10)
4. Ease of Maintenance ( /10)
5. Performance Both Under Sail and while Motoring ( /10)
6. Natural Ventilation / general livability ( /10)
Still, you are asking very subjective questions. Unless someone has owned every model you are considering and will answer truthfully, I doubt you'll gain any useful knowledge.

What do you mean by "True Solo Sail Ability"?

This can mean many different things to different people. No, I don't have all lines run to the helm. Does that make my boat true non-solo capable? I think not, but many would probably argue with me. I chose not to run halyards/reefing lines to the helm, I don't want the extra stress on the structure. Can I solo sail? Absolutely! Set the AP to hold the boat into the wind and go the mast and raise the main! But, not with 25+ knots of wind, because the AP can't hold the boat steady into that much wind. I don't have electric winches either.

Heavy weather survivability?? I've been in 55kts winds/12ft 3-second seas. I was never scared, just pissed off that I let myself get caught in such weather. But I certainly have no intention to take my boat to the high latitudes.

Carrying capacity? Manufacturer rated or real world? My boat is rated for 3400kg (~7500lbs). I do care about weight, my new dinghy is 65lbs lighter than the old for this very reason. Cats perform better lighter and balanced.

Build Quality? Compared to what?

Ease of maintenance? None of them are easy, all systems are stuck in small cramped spaces, it's a boat!

Performance under sail and motor? Too many factors to answer. I've had my boat sailing at 11.7kts. Should I use that one-time event to answer your question? I plan passages at 6.2kts. motor and/or sail. We usually arrive earlier than planned, but not always as there are things like unplanned weather, current, etc.

Natural Ventilation? I use Breeze Boosters and can get a good amount of air flow thru the boat. But only when the wind blows!
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Old 11-05-2013, 21:05   #66
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Being another noob in the crowd here I must add that I find this thread very helpful. Despite my own tendency to analyze into minutia, issues have been raised here that I never really thought about. A man with more experience than I once compared some brands as follows:

FP - Hyundai
Lagoon - Toyota
Nautitec - Porsche

While I think the recommendation to consider catamarans as more like houses is both apt and useful, the above style analysis also applies. We're talking about complex machines, many of which have common pros and cons.

If you're going to buy a boat, it's reasonable to assume you'll do more than what you might on a weekly charter. My experience with Mother Nature suggests doing your homework (even if only out of respect) so that when she decides to toss you about like a feather on the breeze you stand a good fighting chance.

The rest (livability, etc) is gravy. But gravy is also often important.

I wish they could combine the sexy condo style of FPs with the rock solidness and tech innovation of a Schionning. Maybe someone will ... trade offs schmadeoffs.

Personally, I think I'll charter for a good while ... at least until I can afford a new beachfront home with a private dock. Doesn't seem to make sense to have a boat unless it's nearby. Expensive assets as a business can be a real pain. Plus even in CFA-101 they'll teach you "assets are bad mmm'kay?"

Plus isn't there an old adage about, "If you fly it, sail it, or f**k it ... then make sure you rent it."

If I did own my own boat I'd want it to be as comfy and stylish as an Ikea showroom, solid as a tank, reliable as a Honda, and as easy to work on as possible.

Schmadeoffs I say ... schmadeoffs.
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Old 12-05-2013, 06:12   #67
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArtM View Post
It's just that when you get to the end of the analysis, and it comes time actually acquire a boat, there comes the matters of availability, of actual price, of condition,etc. The limited availability of boats of specific makes, models, years, and condition very often becomes the key decision factor in the final purchase regardless of the analysis made.
Another set of fundamental factors that will ultimately have major consequences. I have been keenly watching the online brokerages with regard to price / availability in the new and second hand markets, though I’ve the distinct impression that this offers me only a superficial indication.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talbot View Post
Where the value of this analysis really is shown is not in the acceptance of the good stuff, but in the actual acceptance of some of the bad. You will have a much better idea up front on what might otherwise have soured you to the boat over time.
Point well taken, perceptual narrowing is all too easy a trap to fall into.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Therapy View Post
Fresh Salt,

I went back through a few pages thinking I saw what your budget is and cannot find it.

??

I (and I am sure others) would be delighted if you would, in the end, post your list of pros and cons for each of the boats you considered.

I am not in the market right now and know the boat I want I can never afford but I am still holding hope that one day I can do, at least for a little while, what I have always wanted to do before I die. The glimmer is still there but dimmer as time goes by.

The comment about inaccessibility of repair/maintenance items bring back memories in several boats I have owned or been acquainted with. First on my list of boats to strike off the list would be those. But how to find out about them quickly and easily? If at all...............

I am inspired by thoughtful people like you and what they think.
Originally I did not mention my budget +/_ 500k US as I didn’t wish it to become a focal point, even though it is ultimately an inescapable factor.

That said I now find my self with 3 seemingly distinct options:

1. A new vessel for 500k, where I try to check as many of my boxes as I can and accept the inevitable trade-offs.

2. A used vessel that addresses my core requirements for a lesser price, with the balance of earmarked funds used to refit and upgrade to my liking eliminating as many trade-offs as possible.

3. Spending more than I originally intended to have a custom job done. (And probably still have a fair number of trade-offs to accept.)

The jury is still out, but I find myself leaning strongly toward option 2 at this stage. The major issue keeping the other options on the table is eventual resale value.

The maintenance factor has certainly become a core issue on a couple of levels, at the moment I’m still trying to wrap my head around what the deal breakers in this regard should be. Though as with most issues covered, only first hand, on board investigation is going to provide hard answers.

I'd be glad to post what I've learned once I've had the opportunity to balance it against real world experience. First impressions will be around the end of July this year.

Best of luck in catching up with your dream boat.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DotDun View Post
Still, you are asking very subjective questions. Unless someone has owned every model you are considering and will answer truthfully, I doubt you'll gain any useful knowledge.

What do you mean by "True Solo Sail Ability"?

This can mean many different things to different people. No, I don't have all lines run to the helm. Does that make my boat true non-solo capable? I think not, but many would probably argue with me. I chose not to run halyards/reefing lines to the helm, I don't want the extra stress on the structure. Can I solo sail? Absolutely! Set the AP to hold the boat into the wind and go the mast and raise the main! But, not with 25+ knots of wind, because the AP can't hold the boat steady into that much wind. I don't have electric winches either.

Heavy weather survivability?? I've been in 55kts winds/12ft 3-second seas. I was never scared, just pissed off that I let myself get caught in such weather. But I certainly have no intention to take my boat to the high latitudes.

Carrying capacity? Manufacturer rated or real world? My boat is rated for 3400kg (~7500lbs). I do care about weight, my new dinghy is 65lbs lighter than the old for this very reason. Cats perform better lighter and balanced.

Build Quality? Compared to what?

Ease of maintenance? None of them are easy, all systems are stuck in small cramped spaces, it's a boat!

Performance under sail and motor? Too many factors to answer. I've had my boat sailing at 11.7kts. Should I use that one-time event to answer your question? I plan passages at 6.2kts. motor and/or sail. We usually arrive earlier than planned, but not always as there are things like unplanned weather, current, etc.

Natural Ventilation? I use Breeze Boosters and can get a good amount of air flow thru the boat. But only when the wind blows!
Thanks for your patience and valuable critique, and reminding me there are no short cuts worth taking.


It is evident that I did not put sufficient thought onto my questions and presented them in far too broad a fashion. Falling pitifully short of what I was hoping to achieve that being to compare owners’ perceptions of and insights specific to their vessels in order to get a general feel for what’s out there.

Even so the responses so far have given me much insight into peripheral considerations which have proven most relevant, ones I’d have never seen coming left purely to my own devices.

Back to drawing board and the adage “If you want the right answers, ask the right questions”

I’ll attempt to clarify with the understanding that most questions invite subjective answers:

1. True Solo Sail Ability – Can the vessel be docked, anchored, sailed in a safe manner by one person without major levels of expertise, vessel modification or difficulty?

2. Suitability for Offshore Passage. – Would you be / Are you comfortable taking the vessel on extended voyages and or circumnavigations. Would you chance the higher latitudes with it?

3. Carrying Capacity – Are you able to carry basic equipment and stores (2-4 people) for extended cruising without major sacrifices in performance?

4. General Build Quality / Durability – Is the vessel prone to any structural defects, does deck hardware, rigging etc corrode, do internal fittings come away from the hulls etc?

5. Ease of Maintenance – Relative to limited space on boats, is access to areas requiring routine maintenance well thought out? Can the plumbing and other major systems be serviced without taking half the boat apart?

6. Performance

Under Sail – How close to the wind is an effective point of sail, are there any model specific issues effecting how the vessel sails that you consider important i.e. mast placement?

Under Motor: - Do you consider the standard engines sufficient or underpowered for offshore cruising, are you happy with the drive configuration?

7. Natural Ventilation / General Livability – How well is ventilation addressed, is air-conditioning or the use of wind boosters a must? What configuration are the salon windows, angled / upright do they open or not, and to what degree does that effect internal temperature and comfort vs visibility?

The above with an eye to living on the boat full time for at least 10 years and certainly longer if I get my way and the seas are willing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by djtopper View Post
If I did own my own boat I'd want it to be as comfy and stylish as an Ikea showroom, solid as a tank, reliable as a Honda, and as easy to work on as possible.
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Old 12-05-2013, 07:03   #68
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

WIth that budget you can get a used Outremer 45 for 360k in ft laud-or less--+ 30-40 k to perfect it---------anything else is "run of the mill"....
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Old 12-05-2013, 11:41   #69
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

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WIth that budget you can get a used Outremer 45 for 360k in ft laud-or less--+ 30-40 k to perfect it---------anything else is "run of the mill"....
I've only seen a few Outremer's, but the ones I've seen have been very nice. I think these boats are often outfitted with custom features, each one I've seen has had unique decor.
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Old 12-05-2013, 17:58   #70
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fresh Salt View Post
[B]


Originally I did not mention my budget +/_ 500k US as I didn’t wish it to become a focal point, even though it is ultimately an inescapable factor.

That said I now find my self with 3 seemingly distinct options:

1. A new vessel for 500k, where I try to check as many of my boxes as I can and accept the inevitable trade-offs.

2. A used vessel that addresses my core requirements for a lesser price, with the balance of earmarked funds used to refit and upgrade to my liking eliminating as many trade-offs as possible.

3. Spending more than I originally intended to have a custom job done. (And probably still have a fair number of trade-offs to accept.)

The jury is still out, but I find myself leaning strongly toward option 2 at this stage. The major issue keeping the other options on the table is eventual resale value.

The maintenance factor has certainly become a core issue on a couple of levels, at the moment I’m still trying to wrap my head around what the deal breakers in this regard should be. Though as with most issues covered, only first hand, on board investigation is going to provide hard answers.

I'd be glad to post what I've learned once I've had the opportunity to balance it against real world experience. First impressions will be around the end of July this year.

Best of luck in catching up with your dream boat.


I found another post on another thread that said 1.5 mil.

That is what I was thinking about when wondering why it was so hard for you to figure out the boat.

The biggest plus on a used boat is.......err...........there are more than one.........being someone else is taking the first big devaluation from new to used. Second big one is that most likely many kinks have been worked out already. If not corrected properly then at least identified. If you buy from a private seller that is relatively honest then after the sale they may be enticed into telling you a secret or two so you find out the easy way.

I would suspect you need to end up with a Privilege. They will hold up for your 10 years better than most others. Antares is too much as is a Maverick and there are not many out there. Manta is too small. The big three (FP, Lagoon and Leopard) are not as tough but certainly higher in numbers available. I know little of the price/availability of cats from down under.
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Old 13-05-2013, 04:21   #71
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

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I found another post on another thread that said 1.5 mil.

That is what I was thinking about when wondering why it was so hard for you to figure out the boat.

The biggest plus on a used boat is.......err...........there are more than one.........being someone else is taking the first big devaluation from new to used. Second big one is that most likely many kinks have been worked out already. If not corrected properly then at least identified. If you buy from a private seller that is relatively honest then after the sale they may be enticed into telling you a secret or two so you find out the easy way.

I would suspect you need to end up with a Privilege. They will hold up for your 10 years better than most others. Antares is too much as is a Maverick and there are not many out there. Manta is too small. The big three (FP, Lagoon and Leopard) are not as tough but certainly higher in numbers available. I know little of the price/availability of cats from down under.
I'm spoilt for choice that much is clear.

One of the first boats in this thread to catch my eye was the Privilege, and have since not found anything about them that seems a deal breaker.

As for the Maverick range, I’ve just heard back from them and you may be surprised to know that they fall within the 500k ball park, the 440 Executive, including commissioning, launch and a month’s worth of mooring at the V&A waterfront in Cape Town clocks in as the most pricy at round 530k.

The standard 400 missing a couple bells n whistles but with the same deal on launch, commission and mooring comes in just shy of 100k less at round 421k. Autopilot, Radar and Chart Plotter being the most notable items not included, and I quite like the idea of choosing those for myself.

The other missing items are mostly cosmetic in nature, with things like TVs, lower upholstery & lighting budgets, additional bathroom fitting etc. In any case items I can live without.

I’ll definitely be paying them a visit in August to take a look for myself.
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Old 13-05-2013, 23:12   #72
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fresh Salt View Post
I’ll attempt to clarify with the understanding that most questions invite subjective answers:

1. True Solo Sail Ability – Can the vessel be docked, anchored, sailed in a safe manner by one person without major levels of expertise, vessel modification or difficulty?

2. Suitability for Offshore Passage. – Would you be / Are you comfortable taking the vessel on extended voyages and or circumnavigations. Would you chance the higher latitudes with it?

3. Carrying Capacity – Are you able to carry basic equipment and stores (2-4 people) for extended cruising without major sacrifices in performance?

4. General Build Quality / Durability – Is the vessel prone to any structural defects, does deck hardware, rigging etc corrode, do internal fittings come away from the hulls etc?

5. Ease of Maintenance – Relative to limited space on boats, is access to areas requiring routine maintenance well thought out? Can the plumbing and other major systems be serviced without taking half the boat apart?

6. Performance

Under Sail – How close to the wind is an effective point of sail, are there any model specific issues effecting how the vessel sails that you consider important i.e. mast placement?

Under Motor: - Do you consider the standard engines sufficient or underpowered for offshore cruising, are you happy with the drive configuration?

7. Natural Ventilation / General Livability – How well is ventilation addressed, is air-conditioning or the use of wind boosters a must? What configuration are the salon windows, angled / upright do they open or not, and to what degree does that effect internal temperature and comfort vs visibility?

The above with an eye to living on the boat full time for at least 10 years and certainly longer if I get my way and the seas are willing.

Interesting thread, I'm also in a search, perhaps a bit smaller and lower budget. This thread has motivated me to write down the factors I've been going through in my own mind. As others have said, I've long given up on "deal breakers" like straight vs saildrive, balsa core, etc. there are so many factors and so few options, that these types of things will just have to be dealt with if the other elements are right. Here is my first go at a list, curious about feedback from the assembled wisdom (or perhaps great unwashed masses).

Fresh Salt, don't mean to hijack your thread, but would love some feedback.

Reasonable maintenance cost. It's not only what it costs to buy, but what it costs to own. While there are a number of older big cats for sale, the maintenance, cleaning, etc of that size boat will just be too much time, energy, and $. Fewer, simpler, more robust systems are the order of the day. This is not just about length, as surely a Lagoon 400 of today is as big as 45-50er of 15 years ago.

General layout and Views Forward while Sailing: I just don't get these cats where the helm is the only place you can see forward, and everyone else sitting in the cockpit is staring at the back of the bridge deck. I've chartered many many of them over the last 18 years. When it comes to accepting the basic fact that most sail on autopilot, I want to see forward when not glued to the helm chair (especially those cheesy pipe helm seats), and might actually like to engage with crew/guests while keeping an eye forward. Or if sailing short handed or solo, have a nice comfy place to sit and read while keeping an eye forward without getting up every X minutes to do a horizon scan. It seems that only Chris White's Atlantics and Maine Cat offer a solution, also Seawind but I haven’t sailed one. (others??) The other problem with some of these deck house mounted helms, is that if you are sitting up there, you are so far above the water line that motion is amplified. I’ve chartered Lagoon 380s/400s and an FP46, and the motion is much worse, especially when it’s light and lumpy compared to say a privilege 39 or catana 50 that I've also chartered. It's one thing for the few miles from White's to Cane Garden Bay, but it's a whole other to sit there for 40 miles out to Santa Barbara Island or for days down the coast to Cabo.

moderate performance - light/medium air You can always shorten sail in the heavy stuff, the real question is will she go in 7-10 knots of wind. I'm just not sure there is that big of a difference in the performance of a condo-cat and a "performance cruiser", so perhaps this is just a matter of getting a big screecher and taking what you get. Seawind and Maine Cat claim to be lighter, better power to weight, etc, but the blogs I've read and owners I've talked to don't show substantially faster sailing. Lore has it the Atlantics, Outremers, etc are a bit of an exception, but not in the budget at this time.

comfort at anchor. This is probably the area where most cats get a pass. But ok, I’ll admit it, I like the living room like salon of the seawind 1160. there are others too, but love the "couch" and opening doors. Maine Cat 41 is nice too as its kind of like a mini-"great room"... would need to add more cushy soft surfaces. Not sure I like the crawl in bunk on the Maine Cat. I really need to charter both the Seawind and Maine Cat, over the years have chartered the commonly available Privilege, FP, Lagoon, Catana, even a thing called a Tasman 4000 in Australia once.

cool weather comfort. So Cal is cool on the water much of the year, the ability to close up without feeling like you are in a cave is a big plus. If I wanted to be “inside” I’d have a mono and go down in the hole. I'd like to spend a season or three in the pacific northwest, so this is even more important. Maine Cat 30 and 41 win here with the complete enclosure.

moderate size - The Catana 50 was the first charter where I said this thing is just too big. I'm sure you could get used to it, but why. After that, I read “Sensible Cruising: The Thoreau Approach”. I’ve sailed even bigger boats, they are fun when you have lots of friends/crew. I don’t need a hotel, 1 or 2 heads is enough. 1 nice owners cabin. smaller bunks for a few guests/storage is fine.
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Old 14-05-2013, 01:16   #73
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Hi Mark424, the more info the better, so hijack away.

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moderate performance - light/medium air You can always shorten sail in the heavy stuff, the real question is will she go in 7-10 knots of wind. I'm just not sure there is that big of a difference in the performance of a condo-cat and a "performance cruiser"
I’ve just recently come across something that has considerably piqued my interest, lying somewhere in "no-mans land" between condo, offshore cruiser and performance boat" unfortunately the link to specs on their site is not working for me and there are limited photos.

Not sure how this would do in light to medium air.

If the write ups on the site ( scape-39-sport-cruiser ) are to be believed this "offshore capable" tub, is pretty quick and handles a dream.



I’ve requested specifications and pricing, depending thereon, my next enquiries aimed at the builder will be to find out, just how accommodating they can be.

Not withstanding that I’m a dedicated bachelor and would gladly put up with less interior space than most, that day-sailor setup just won’t hack it.

In the words of Mr. djtopper “trade offs schmadeoffs”?
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Old 15-05-2013, 11:00   #74
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

We were in the same dilemma 5 years ago, looking at every cat in the 40' - 45' range for full-time cruising the U.S. east coast, Bahamas & Caribbean. In the end, a Maine Cat 41 won out & although we have some issues we're attempting to resolve, we love the layout, speed & design.

Although I could write volumes, I'd like to address 2 features:

The cockpit/"great room"/helm: The space is huge, fully enclosed with Strataglass with the helm in the middle. At first, this completely turned us off, but after talking with several owners, chartering one & having now cruised full-time for 3 years, we love it & can't imagine a "conventional" layout! For our style cruising, a remote or the newer "flybridge" helm would be a poor choice. I have never understood the "autopilot runs the boat" so you don't have to be at the helm anyway ... not where/how we cruise! When the lobster pots end, the crab pots begin, not to mention floating debris & wanting to constantly check the chartplotter, radar & AIS. For weeks each spring & fall, we're cruising/sailing 8 - 12 hours every day & having the helm "in" with the dinette right there allows front-row seating with the helm 4' away. In cool and/or rainy weather it's great too - with even a little bit of sun, the cockpit is toasty & dry, even when it's 40's & windy. In warm weather, any/all of the Strataglass panels can be rolled up for as much breeze as you'd like & we have a sunscreen to help with that.

Daggerboards: I won't attempt to address every pro & con, but they work well. In calm water with 12 knots+, we can sail 30 degrees to the wind & otherwise 40 degrees (some other cat owners have told me that they don't even try with anything less then 50 degrees). Although not designed as such, we have more than once inadvertently used them as "feeler gauges" entering a questionable anchorage at dead slow speed - if you bump, just raise them & reverse out (although we draw just less than 3' anyway). One downside is noise - they "rattle" sometimes & sleeping next to them on offshore passages can be difficult, depending on speed & sea state. They're especially noisy at 9+ knots, but a small price to pay!

Good luck!

Russ
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Old 15-05-2013, 21:58   #75
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Re: 40ft Catamaran Owners Please

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ortolan View Post
We were in the same dilemma 5 years ago, looking at every cat in the 40' - 45' range for full-time cruising the U.S. east coast, Bahamas & Caribbean. In the end, a Maine Cat 41 won out & although we have some issues we're attempting to resolve, we love the layout, speed & design.

Although I could write volumes, I'd like to address 2 features:

The cockpit/"great room"/helm: The space is huge, fully enclosed with Strataglass with the helm in the middle. At first, this completely turned us off, but after talking with several owners, chartering one & having now cruised full-time for 3 years, we love it & can't imagine a "conventional" layout! For our style cruising, a remote or the newer "flybridge" helm would be a poor choice. I have never understood the "autopilot runs the boat" so you don't have to be at the helm anyway ... not where/how we cruise! When the lobster pots end, the crab pots begin, not to mention floating debris & wanting to constantly check the chartplotter, radar & AIS. For weeks each spring & fall, we're cruising/sailing 8 - 12 hours every day & having the helm "in" with the dinette right there allows front-row seating with the helm 4' away. In cool and/or rainy weather it's great too - with even a little bit of sun, the cockpit is toasty & dry, even when it's 40's & windy. In warm weather, any/all of the Strataglass panels can be rolled up for as much breeze as you'd like & we have a sunscreen to help with that.

Daggerboards: I won't attempt to address every pro & con, but they work well. In calm water with 12 knots+, we can sail 30 degrees to the wind & otherwise 40 degrees (some other cat owners have told me that they don't even try with anything less then 50 degrees). Although not designed as such, we have more than once inadvertently used them as "feeler gauges" entering a questionable anchorage at dead slow speed - if you bump, just raise them & reverse out (although we draw just less than 3' anyway). One downside is noise - they "rattle" sometimes & sleeping next to them on offshore passages can be difficult, depending on speed & sea state. They're especially noisy at 9+ knots, but a small price to pay!

Good luck!

Russ
Hi Russ,

Thanks for your post, the “great room” is an interesting concept, fantastic visibility and ventilation, my immediate concern would be how it functions in heavy weather? At first glance it appears that if you ever had waves breaking on the boat it would be most unpleasant given that the whole enclosure is “Strata-glass”. Any experiences / thoughts on this?

Dave
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