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Old 27-05-2013, 17:41   #31
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Re: Wood for interior

Thanks Delfin , I'll make sure of that... anyways what I was going to build would not be in an high traffic area so It should not too bad even if it soft
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Old 27-05-2013, 17:49   #32
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Maybe I'm just being cheap, but I find it rewarding to find a tree in the woods (usually already dead)and later building someting out of it.
In my case , I build fires !

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Old 27-05-2013, 18:00   #33
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In my below decks rebuild, I have been using Meranti. A beautiful deep red wood, very dense and finishes out beautiful. You can buy both plywood and dimensional lumber in pretty much any size you desire.

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Old 27-05-2013, 18:26   #34
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Re: Wood for interior

I love Cherry and the way it changes color with time, becoming better and better. It is too weak for floors though. We are changing to something else, probably a carpet or vinyl. I have been thinking about bamboo too... many choices.
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Old 27-05-2013, 18:32   #35
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Re: Wood for interior

For your area ash is probably the cheapest followed by alder. Ash is like hickory and has that open grain effect like oak. Alder looks like cherry especially with a cherry stain but it will bleach in the sun so any trim around hatches and portholes will bleach pale yellow. Then it looks like ****. Red oak and maple are about the same price but you just can't beat the availability of red oak. You can buy it anywhere. No special orders.
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Old 27-05-2013, 18:59   #36
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Re: Wood for interior

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Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
I love Cherry and the way it changes color with time, becoming better and better. It is too weak for floors though. We are changing to something else, probably a carpet or vinyl. I have been thinking about bamboo too... many choices.
Bamboo is wicked hard, but you better really like it because it is awfully busy. Definitely check out Jotoba flooring. This is only 3/4 inch thick so the weight shouldn't be too bad. If you went this route, glue it to the substrate.

Prefinished Brazilian Cherry Flooring: Prefinished Brazilian Cherry Hardwood Flooring

Here is what a door built out of it looks like:
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Old 27-05-2013, 19:10   #37
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Re: Wood for interior

How about Spruce? When my Wife and her Ex.put an interior in a 38' aluminum racing boat, they used Spruce. Nice and light colored.
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Old 27-05-2013, 19:11   #38
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Re: Wood for interior

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Deciding which wood to use should factor in weight and where it is to be used. Many sailboats have too much wood, IMHO, and are too dark below as a result. A compromise I used when building out Delfin was to trim white painted Okume marine plywood with very hard, very pretty Jotoba, a la Herreshof. The Jotoba gains a rich reddish color on its own and resists dings, being harder than white oak. It is a renewable wood. This gives you a balance between weight (yours is sail, so lighter is better) with durable trim.

Cedar is used in lots of boats in the Northwest, but is subject to damage because it is so soft. It also naturally turns to a yellowish color which to my eye isn't very pleasing.

For flooring, pick something hard. Moabi is what I used and it is pretty good, pretty hard and not too heavy for a sailboat. Moabi benefits from a thorough sealing, and turns a natural beautiful reddish color.

There's a section on Delfin's website on what woods were used and how they were finished.
Great job on that interior, looks excellent. Can you tell me about your technique for installing that ceiling in the first picture? I to am going through a big interior renovation and want to do my ceilings that way but am wondering the best way to section it off.
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Old 27-05-2013, 20:14   #39
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Re: Wood for interior

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Great job on that interior, looks excellent. Can you tell me about your technique for installing that ceiling in the first picture? I to am going through a big interior renovation and want to do my ceilings that way but am wondering the best way to section it off.
It's 5/16" MDF that was 90 degree v-grooved 1/8" deep with a table router then painted. The edges were beveled to match up to the next panel, where necessary. I just used whole 4 x 8 panels. The main trick was jigging up to keep each "board" exactly 4" wide.

Hope that helps...
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Old 27-05-2013, 20:32   #40
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Re: Wood for interior

Oh ha, I was mostly talking about the trim and how you mounted the panels to the cabin top. Many of us have 3/4" thin cabin tops that you can't just screw into. I've seen many people use their dividers or trim as extra rigidness for their cabin tops by laminating battens together and epoxying them to the cabin top, then mounting the ceiling to the dividers, if that makes any sense.

Sort of like this:
http://www.boatshop24.com/en/advert/...-cutter/227466

or this
http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=2575475
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Old 27-05-2013, 21:06   #41
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Re: Wood for interior

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Oh ha, I was mostly talking about the trim and how you mounted the panels to the cabin top. Many of us have 3/4" thin cabin tops that you can't just screw into. I've seen many people use their dividers or trim as extra rigidness for their cabin tops by laminating battens together and epoxying them to the cabin top, then mounting the ceiling to the dividers, if that makes any sense.

Sort of like this:
31' Cape George Cutter for sale in United States - 227466 - Boatshop24.com

or this
View Boat Photos - YachtWorld.com
DOH.

Ok....the seam covers are two piece, spaced 2' apart. From memory, the base that covers the seam and screws into the deck beam is around 2" wide and 1/2" deep. The cap piece is 2 3/4" x 1/4" bullnose, both out of Jotoba. The over hang gives a finger support for grabbing out in a seaway. The cap is screwed onto the base, then plugged.

I put a faux deck plank fore and aft that actually forms a raceway for wiring, and the seam covers butt up against that in the main saloon, master and forepeak office.

And yes, the idea of epoxying battens onto the underside of the cabin top to give you something to screw into makes sense. You don't need more than 1/4 to provide something to screw into.

There might be another way to do it, but were it moi, I would kerf a strip of 1/4" spruce so that when combination glued with epoxy and contact cement, the batten will stay in place from the contact cement until the epoxy kicks off.

Is that closer to what you were asking?....
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Old 27-05-2013, 21:41   #42
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Talking Re: Wood for interior

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How about cedar ?

Anyone has any experience using it ?

thanks
I bought an Ingrid 38 back in the 70's and the old owner had got his partner in a family way (do they still use that term?) and was forced to sell his pride and joy. It came with a finished head, galley, teak and holly cabin sole, all the rigging (stainless), mast was stepped but not rigged, sails and line but the finishing wood was stacked about 2 feet high on the cabin sole. It was clear, matched (milled from the same tree!) red cedar 2" planking. Beautiful wood but soft! and enough mahogany to trim out the whole boat. I measured the first piece about 4 times, made my first cut which I totally screwed up and was smart enough to stop right there and hire a gifted woodworker/cabinet maker who finished her off for me using copper fasteners! Six coats of varnish later she just beamed down below. Kept that boat and lived aboard for over 20 years in the PNW cruising as far as Alaska and down to the Columbia River and back before sailing to San Francisco. Never a scratch or a ding on the brightwork. Sold her for more than twice what I paid for her. I still dream about her and that was nearly 50 years ago!! I wouldn't hesitate to use red cedar below again but I imagine it is pretty spendy now, if you can find it. Phil
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Old 27-05-2013, 21:50   #43
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Re: Wood for interior

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Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
I'm not aware of cedar being toxic in any way - fragrant yes, but toxic? If that were the case, there would be thousands of homes in the Northwest will some real problems so I wouldn't worry much about that. As noted, the only issue with cedar is that you can dent it with a fingernail, which is why yellow cedar is used on boats, it being the only cedar with any level of resistance to dings. Atlantic white cedar is the softest of all, so know your species before you commit to it. Atlantic cedar is about as hard as cotton wood, which is to say, as hard as cotton.

If you like the yellowed look, which you will get with our without varnish and can live with the softness, go for it. However, you might try taking a piece, dilute any kind of solvent based white paint 75% with thinner and wiping that onto a sample as an invisible stain. Varnish it and see what you think. Cedar treated this way won't yellow anywhere nearly to the same degree as untreated cedar.
FYI Delfin:
The toxicity of constituents of cedar... [J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1989] - PubMed - NCBI
There are many articles attributing cedar to asthma and pulmonary problems. And these are studies, not opinions. Still, feel free to build what you want with what you want. I will be taking it out of my boat. Its especially toxic to pets, which I didn't know till I reviewed the literature.
Good luck with your projects, but I hope you leave your cedar to wardrobe and blanket storage (where it is useful because it kills bugs).
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Old 27-05-2013, 21:56   #44
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Re: Wood for interior

I should have mentioned that there is a big cosmetic difference between red and yellow cedar. Red being preferred but more pricy. As far as toxicity goes, some folks are allergic to cedar dust and slivers... some of my old crew who I worked with in the bush back in the day damn near died from being poisoned from it, particularly if they were working in sawmills or falling trees. Whenever I travel back home, I try and spend some time in the bush up there... the odor brings back a simpler time for me. Phil
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Old 27-05-2013, 21:57   #45
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Re: Wood for interior

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Eucalyptus is used a fair amount in Oz. Hard as steel and basically lasts forever although is subject to a bit of checking. It is also heavy as steel, which for many sailboats means it is only be used for trim, rubrails, etc.
nice work in those photos - real craftsmanship. Not sure about your description of eucalyptus - what you seem to be describing is ironbark, which i just used to make a forward hatch - it is as hard as steel, a little heavy but it is absolutely impervious to weather, doesnt need any treatment. Definitely wouldnt use it on an interior, but there are some quite pretty eucalypts that would be fine if used as trims...
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