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Old 26-08-2009, 03:41   #1
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Will $30k Buy a 40-50' Sailboat Big Enough to Live On?

Hi everyone.

I am new here and as many newbies I guess, I am now looking for a boat to take my wife around the Mediterrean sea and later on the South Carribean.

She almost never sailed but loved it the two times we tried

First time, that was with a 20 foot trailera sailboat that had its mast broken between Italy and Corfu after a storm with rain and wind that lasted on for 10 minutes, very strange since the wheather was splendid before and after the 10 minutes storm !

and she still loves to sail !!! so this summer we spent a week sailing in the archipel of Stockholm. Wonderful.

I am looking for a 36-40 feet sail boat, or a fifty (with a rear cabin for friends) with enough living space to live on for six months.

It has to have enough space underneath so that I can stand upright, I measure 188 cm (6,1680 ft or 74,02 inches).

I do not need a fast sailer, but a boat that has low draft and is secure in case of heavy wheather. Perhaps this is impossible ? I mean, if the draft is shallow, can the boat be secure ? My thoughts also went for a catamaran but it seems to be to expensive.

To finish, I would probably come to the states to pick one up and sail it over here since it seems to be so much cheaper over there.

Any ideas to help me ?

All the best, Raymond, Swede living in sunny France.
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Old 26-08-2009, 04:32   #2
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Ray,

Check this out:

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...7-a-29757.html

I have no idea if this is the right boat for you, but at $25K it's a hell of a deal if in any kind of good condition.

A Tayana 37 is a well-known Perry design, very capable of crossing oceans. Good sea motion, pretty roomy as well for a 37-footer.

Bill
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Old 26-08-2009, 06:55   #3
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Thank, you, it might very well be worth it.......

I will check it out now
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Old 26-08-2009, 07:24   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayfromFrance View Post
Hi everyone.

I am new here and as many newbies I guess, I am now looking for a boat to take my wife around the Mediterrean sea and later on the South Carribean.

She almost never sailed but loved it the two times we tried .....

To finish, I would probably come to the states to pick one up and sail it over here since it seems to be so much cheaper over there.

Any ideas to help me ?

All the best, Raymond, Swede living in sunny France.
If you wait till the real recession hits: it may be cheaper, so that you can buy a safe boat for that little cash. Then inflation will come, too: so timing is needed. Just keep watch, like when sailing.
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Old 26-08-2009, 07:31   #5
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Thanks, but is not the Tayana 37 for 25000 dollars a VERY good deal, if it is in good shape ?
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Old 26-08-2009, 07:53   #6
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Ray,
remember anything you buy in America especially at the price range you are looking forward to is going to need a lot of money to make it capable of an atlantic crossing;
Unless you know the standing rigging is less than 10 years old you will need to replace it..
you will almost certainly need new electronics
a liferaft
a dinghy
at least a spare sail ( or two)
Plus if you buy a US built boat you will have to bring it up to RCD specs ( a friend of mine had to replace the engine because it was a type not certified for the EU ( Isuzu)
Plus you will need to add on 17.5 % VAT
There is some other stuff. I dont want to put you off, but these expenses can bite you hard if you are not aware. I have purchased 2 boats in the US and taken them back to the EU, pretty much you should expect to double the purchase price in costs. meeting the RCD can be horrendous.
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Old 26-08-2009, 08:06   #7
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Thank You Rhosyn, this will help me.

Would I have to register it in Europe, just becaues I am swedish ?

Since France is impossible, I would try my lack to register it in Sweden, my natal country. I must be easier than in France !

Anyway, even if I double the price or 17 000 euros, this makes it 34000 euros, that is pretty much within my budget of 30 000 euros.

Thank you for telling me. Since the boat is so cheap, I might just go ahead and learn on the way.

One question though ? Can I register it in the USA while saling it during the winter in Cuba and the Carribean and sailing it over to Europe in June ?

Thank You, Raymond
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Old 26-08-2009, 08:57   #8
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I have to support Roshyn Mor. Tayana is of good design but of Taiwanese built. I am not very sure that very high quality components are used, so be prepared for surprises.
Nevertheless the US is plastered with boats of all kinds and I am sure you will find the boat of your liking as long as you are prepared to do a complete refit since not all boats have been treated respectfully.
Different electrical systems, a sailwardrobe that will definitely ask for a replacement, an engine in questionable condition, etc. etc.
Then: EC documents. A very big obstacle, specifically in Red Tape France.
Insurance and flagging - you have to arrange an agreement with an insurer before you leave for the temporarily insurance of your vessel in spe.

You have to look under the black line if you gain any profit of buying a boat in the US within the scope of your budget.
There are many interesting boats in the US, specifically classics that are not longer existent in Europe.
But for just a general type of boat I personally would look in area's like Spain (non-sailors) Holland and Greece.

my two pennies
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Old 26-08-2009, 10:51   #9
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yes, thank you MacG

And this is such a great website, so many answers so quickly, quite amazing. Finally, yes, it seems that buying in Europe is not such a bad idea. And what about my country sweden, there are some fifty's and in Sweden there is no moist since the boats are out of water for most of the year. I will check this out now.

But if I buy in the USA, could I sail under US flag as a swedish citizen ?
That would solve the problem. About insurance, I would take the risk to sail without insurance for a boat that costs 25 k.

Thank You Everyone. Raymond
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Old 26-08-2009, 11:01   #10
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Ray, no one except US citizens can fly under a US flag and title.

Your other option would be state registration in a state where you reside--but since you don't have residency, that's not an option for you. (And, it might start tax liabilities of 8% or more, as well.)

Your best bet is to flag it legally in the nation(s) that you are entitled to flag it in, and then deal with a US Cruising Permit for the time you are in US waters.

Most "bargain boats" are cheap because the broker has mottied something material from the listing, like "was sunk and raised five years ago" or "deck and hull have serisou structural problems" and you are on your own to discover those when you pay for the costs of a haul and survey. "Buyer beware" applies here.

Yes, the market is down and there are some real bargains to be had, but if you look at comparable listings and any boat is more than 5-10% below the listings of comparable boats? The odds are there is something in need of expensive work. An engine, or worthless sails, or standing rigging that needs replacement, or hull work...something. And then there is geography, bear in mind that transporting a boat from the Great Lakes or other parts of the US to the East Coast can be another expense.

For a foreign buyer, I'd suggest locating at least a half dozen likely boats all within one region, then planning to come over and spend two to four weeks driving around and looking at them, and trying to schedule a survey on any one that seemed like a real bargain.

Your wife may not have been discouraged by losing a mast--but if that happens with a 40' boat five hundred miles from land, it could be a very different result. Bigger boats and ocean crossings mean that maintenance must be a very serious concern.
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Old 26-08-2009, 11:23   #11
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Absolutely true
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Old 26-08-2009, 13:37   #12
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yes, and thank you again for all this information

my wife's ex is from Singapore and perhaps we can buy it under his name and avoid the CE thing this way. I will check it out.

Thank You and yes, you are right, spending a few weeks as you say looking at boots this winter, that is probably the best way to go.

Best Regards, Raymond.
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Old 26-08-2009, 14:35   #13
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Also, a good rule of thumb is to plan that the purchase price of the boat be no more than 2/3 of your actual total budget to get her into shape. No matter how good the boat is (even if she is new), there will always be something to suck up additonal funds after the purchase.
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Old 27-08-2009, 04:26   #14
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Yes, you are right, that is what I did

when I say I have 30k, I have 50k in actual savings.

I checked with my wife's ex in Singapore and I can actually register it under his name in Singapore without any hassel at all. This avoids all the problems with red tapes in europe. Great !

And thanks everyone. Raymond
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Old 27-08-2009, 04:46   #15
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Raymond, your nationality or your wife's is insignificant. It applies to the boat only.
If the boat is made and/or registered outside the EU (and had not previously been registered in a EU country) it is subject to CE certification. A process that will set you back for an amount of 4000 euro's or thereabouts.
I speak of own experience.
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