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Old 10-11-2013, 21:45   #1
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Which way would you go?

I have an opportunity to buy one of 2 boats.

The first is an absolute classic with lovely lines, excellent maintenance and in some of the best condition for a timber boat my surveyor has ever seen. Her hull and deck are fiberglass sheaved and she has no major issues whatsoever. She has just enough bunks for the family of 4 and is easy to sail. She doesnt have the creature comforts you might expect in a modern boat but she has class and sailing ability well beyond a modern boat.

Alternatively I can buy a Bavaria/Jeanneau or Beneteau of similar length, nice condition, all the creature comforts, greater volume, about 5 - 8 years old

The purpose of the endeavour is to get me and the family (2 teenagers and experienced sailor wife) coastal sailing and the odd trip for a week or two each year and to keep me happy in what willl be a very long retirement.

So which would you buy?(ignoring price as there is a significant difference) And why?

I look forward to all your very experienced comments

(P.S -- This will be our 4th boat with the earlier boats being in the category of the second option)
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Old 11-11-2013, 00:58   #2
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Re: Which way would you go?

Newer boat, fiberglass. Or, why not a boat offering both the fiberglass hull and the classic woodwork like a Hans Christian?
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Old 11-11-2013, 01:04   #3
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Re: Which way would you go?

Unfortunately the finances arent that flexible, but yes that would be ideal Kenomac
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:34   #4
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Re: Which way would you go?

Don't be afraid to make a low offer on the boat of your dreams, you might be surprised when it's accepted.
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:47   #5
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Re: Which way would you go?

Since buying and selling a yacht is time consuming and expensive ask yourself were you want to be in 10 years time because you won't have 2 teenagers then. We had two teenagers, now its wifey, me and the dog who go sailing. No 1 son is in Europe somewhere last heard of a month ago with the occasional facebook update. No 1 daughter, well we leave the fridge well stocked at home so she won't starve.

Me? I would chose the European GRP yacht everytime, they sail really well and just less maintenance all round.

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Old 11-11-2013, 08:55   #6
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Re: Which way would you go?

If it were truly up to me, I'd probably avoid a wood hull simply because of the maintenance. Though I understand the allure of classic design and could be swayed.
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:18   #7
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Re: Which way would you go?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnathon123 View Post
The purpose of the endeavour is to get me and the family (2 teenagers and experienced sailor wife) coastal sailing and the odd trip for a week or two each year and to keep me happy in what willl be a very long retirement.
May I interpret the above to mean that the main point of the boat is to get out sailing, alone or with family? If both boats provide sufficient accommodation without compromise, and you can afford to buy and maintain either... then I would say the choice should be - which boat makes you happiest to sail? Which boat would make you want to take any opportunity to get out?

For me personally, it seems that maintaining a wood hull is more effort and expense than I want to put in.
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Old 11-11-2013, 10:01   #8
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Re: Which way would you go?

I would buy neither and instead charter or sailtime for another year or more. save up and get the boat of my dreams without the compromise. But that's just me....
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Old 11-11-2013, 10:14   #9
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Re: Which way would you go?

Fiberglass. hands down unless you are a shipwright. It'a about having fun with the family, feeling confident in your ship and minimizing the maintenance required... so your trips to the boat dont become..."but all Dad is going to do down at the boat is work on stuff..."
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Old 11-11-2013, 11:39   #10
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Re: Which way would you go?

The wood boat if you really like doing the maintenance. I have come across many people who really like the building and maintenance more than the sailing. If its about the sailing get as low a maintenance boat as possible.
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Old 11-11-2013, 11:41   #11
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Re: Which way would you go?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnathon123 View Post
Her hull and deck are fiberglass sheaved and she has no major issues whatsoever.
If this means that the hull is a normal planked/caulked timber construction with glass laid over it I would be pretty dubious about it's suitability. This method is sometimes used to "rescue" a dying carvel hull and has little to recommend it. There was a lengthy thread addressing this issue here on CF in the recent past with some informed inputs from various members.


If it is strip planked and epoxy saturated glass over, then it could be a thing of strength and beauty. You need to find out more about the construction IMO.

Good luck, mate!

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Old 11-11-2013, 11:50   #12
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Re: Which way would you go?

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If this means that the hull is a normal planked/caulked timber construction with glass laid over it I would be pretty dubious about it's suitability. This method is sometimes used to "rescue" a dying carvel hull and has little to recommend it. There was a lengthy thread addressing this issue here on CF in the recent past with some informed inputs from various members.


If it is strip planked and epoxy saturated glass over, then it could be a thing of strength and beauty. You need to find out more about the construction IMO.

Good luck, mate!

Jim
Yes..... I missed that... if the hull is wood with glass over... it's usually a problem sooner or later (unless it's cold molded). run!
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Old 11-11-2013, 12:52   #13
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Re: Which way would you go?

Thanks everyone, Jim and Cheechako especially. You guys make an excellent point regarding the technique. If you buy a problem it can be hard to ever move on!

To everyone thank you they are all excellent points and valid. I really appreciate the input.
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Old 11-11-2013, 13:20   #14
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Re: Which way would you go?

I may only be a new Dad but my thought would be, you only have so much time to spend with your children before they fly the coop.

Boats have enough maintenance that needs to be done as it is. I'd vote the newer boat which you will work on less and enjoy spending time with your family more.
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Old 11-11-2013, 13:50   #15
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Re: Which way would you go?

Ya get the newer boat and spend the time on the kids. Swim platforms and other little creature comforts are a big deal for kids - especially teenagers - and my wife insists on hot water for washing dishes.

You'll likely be reselling it before you know it, and having the newer plastic will make that easier. Just like everyone here is saying to you, "skip the fRP clad wood", so will others counsel prospective buyers when you look to move on.

Some people are really into keeping up with their classic boats, some people like to take their families sailing. Unless you are swimming in time, it can be hard to do both.

Best of luck, I had a lot of fun sailing with my kids, who are now 14 and 18. Teenagers have busy lives....
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