Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 29-09-2010, 18:37   #16
CF Adviser
Moderator Emeritus
 
TaoJones's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Montrose, Colorado
Posts: 9,850
Just a reminder, folks:

While new members do occasionally put up first posts that leave more experienced members scratching their heads, this probably isn't one of those times. Publicly questioning the motives of another member is always off-topic and adds nothing to either the thread or the collegial atmosphere we try hard to maintain at Cruisers Forum.

Please keep your doubts or suspicions out of the public forum - if you feel a post is not what it purports to be on the surface, please use the Report Post icon to bring it to the attention of the moderators. Thank you for your cooperation.

TaoJones
__________________

__________________
"Your vision becomes clear only when you look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks within, awakens."
Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961)
TaoJones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2010, 18:58   #17
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,203
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Ok... the safest is probably a steel hard chine with long keel... can take a real pounding and grounding... and get away with it. Also the hard chine is great for 'stiffening'.... she'll heel to the chine then go rock steady... lovely ride... Downside... regular intensive maintainence.
Next is ferrocement.. round hull and full keel.. pretty much as tough as the steel and simple to maintain.. but beware of the home builds unless supervised at all stages... best stick to the Lloyds 100A builds.
Alluminuim comes number 3 for me.. not so sure it'll take nearly as much punishment as the above.. also need to be on constant watch in Marina's, docks where you tie up for live wires sagging into the water near you.
But I must confess the big Ovni's are sexy as hell..


Then its a toss-up between wood and GRP..... each having their plus's and minus's...
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2010, 19:43   #18
Registered User
 
NotQuiteLost's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Paradise (better known to most people as: Philippines)
Boat: 65' Custom Steel Ketch
Posts: 322
Images: 4
The absolute best answer doesn't seem to directly reply to the question.

The safest boat in a nasty blow is the one crewed by a prepared skipper. That doesn't mean possessing incredible amounts of experience, or intangible seafaring skills. It just means someone who understands some fundamentals (how to heave to, how the specific boat handles in windy conditions, how to run away from a storm instead of into it, etc..).

The other important part of the equation is preparedness. Having the proper sails, spare lines, shackles and blocks, and a serviceable sea anchor/drogue are far more important than the geometry or rigging of the boat. All well-made cruising boats can handle rough weather, if you are well-prepared and know the protocols specific to your boat.

So the simple answer, as hinted at in a previous post, is this: whichever hull design has the best prepared skipper is the one that will handle adverse situations best.
__________________
NotQuiteLost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2010, 19:54   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 207
Think Mark J is having a bad hair day. Don't worry about the questions :maker the only stupid question is the one not asked. I am a relative newbi as well. there is much to be learned from the forums here. There is also a few self righteous people on here as well. Most are very helpful and friendly.
__________________
dofthesea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2010, 20:11   #20
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,203
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

All Hail the Rightous......
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2010, 22:53   #21
Registered User
 
kismet's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Maryland USA
Boat: Van de Stadt Victory 40 ketch
Posts: 205
Images: 1
Send a message via Yahoo to kismet
Looks like the inclement weather is affecting the northerly quadrant in a less than hospitable manner. As for wanking...well single handing may play there. Don't be dismayed, your time will come.
__________________
I spent all my money on booze, boats and broads. And the rest of it, I wasted. - Elmore Leonard
next is the proof
kismet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 04:45   #22
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,311
Well it is a question beyound the experience level of the asker. )dds of getting useful info on a forum is poor. Time to read a boat in order to make the best decision for oneself.

To me a steel full keel boat with high ballast, and with lots of watertight sections and small sail area would seem the safest. But then it would be a dog 99.999% of the time (just an estinmate). Guess the safest boat I've ever been on was a nuclear submarine on the surface with the hatches shut.
__________________
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 04:59   #23
Registered User
 
swagman's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Winter land based UK New Forest. Summer months away. Making the transition from sail to power this year - scary stuff.
Boat: Super Van Craft 1320 Power Yacht
Posts: 2,175
Images: 10
Send a message via Skype™ to swagman
I've had a Farrier Tri stick its nose in behind us running before a white line squall - its mast just missed our transom as it pitchpoled. And as it was only 10 metres deep he stayed there!

I've never sailed any muti in a cruising sense, but IMHO a mono is all round safer than any multi, and in materials steel has to be the strongest if you get a big bang. But as others have said also, steel usually means slow, and why plan to be rammed anyway, so maybe steel all round is not best for you either..............

You'll be understanding that with most choices there has to be compromise - so suggest you do need to get greater clarity on what you want to do and where you want to go and how much can you spend and what you actually like sailing etc before making any firm decisions. And as you'll also have gathered from the responses you've got - the sailing world is a very opinionated one so whatever you choose you are not going to get all the others to accept it's right anyway................

But. The nice thing is all the learning and research and study and experiences are a great part of your entry into sailing. So go enjoy.

Good luck.
JOHN
__________________
Don't take life too seriously. No ones going to make it out alive......Go see our blog at http://www.sailblogs.com/member/yachtswagman/
swagman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 05:00   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
Here ya go, extrememly safe.

It'll take anything the ocean can throw at it and take a beating on a rocky shore.

Doesn't go up wind well though.

__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 05:32   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Smithfield Va.
Boat: '72 Tanzer 28 "Her Idea"
Posts: 320
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lucas View Post
Well it is a question beyound the experience level of the asker. )dds of getting useful info on a forum is poor. Time to read a boat in order to make the best decision for oneself.

To me a steel full keel boat with high ballast, and with lots of watertight sections and small sail area would seem the safest. But then it would be a dog 99.999% of the time (just an estinmate). Guess the safest boat I've ever been on was a nuclear submarine on the surface with the hatches shut.

Uhhh...nahh..I know way too much about the construction and maintenance methods...
__________________
1972 Tanzer 28 "Her Idea"
zopi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 06:59   #26
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by dofthesea View Post
There is also a few self righteous people on here as well.
CF have created a special forum for those people


Quote:
Most are very helpful and friendly
Which leaves the rest of the forum 99% like that
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 07:08   #27
Senior Cruiser
 
nautical62's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Live Iowa - Sail mostly Bahamas
Boat: Beneteau 32.5
Posts: 2,264
Images: 12
Not all monohull hulls are built the same, not all multi-hull hulls are built the same. I think one needs to be very careful about making stereotypic comments about them.

Of 4 cruising boats I've owned, the one I turned around and sold after my first Bahamas cruise in it because I thought it was unsafe/not capable was my Telstar Trimaran. I'm sure I would not have felt at all the same about some of the larger cruising trimarans.
__________________
nautical62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 16:13   #28
Nearly an old salt
 
goboatingnow's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 13,649
Images: 3
just to set teh record straight The euro NCAP crash tests for the new Fiat 500 model

is 5 stars, The highest available . the Volvo s60 is 4 stars!, your not neccessarily safer in a Volvo, its just good marketing. ( like wise your not neccessarily safer in a Valient either

Dave
__________________
goboatingnow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 16:21   #29
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,311
Quote:
Originally Posted by zopi View Post
Uhhh...nahh..I know way too much about the construction and maintenance methods...
Can not be too bad. When I got off mine it had been going to sea almost as long as I had been alive!
__________________
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 16:34   #30
Nearly an old salt
 
goboatingnow's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 13,649
Images: 3
Quote:
To eliminate the sailor part, what would happen to an F9 or a 30 Alberg if in a really bad storm around Cape Horn, (all sails down) the sailors take refuge in the cabin? Will the boats survive this bad storm without any input from the sailors and without damage or which one has a better chance to survive it?
Yes OP it probably will. you will not however.

Dave
__________________

__________________
goboatingnow is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cruising Security: Safest Countries MarkJ Cruising News & Events 73 20-10-2010 05:37
Safest Family Cruising Multihull ? morrobay Multihull Sailboats 21 13-08-2010 23:27
Safest Family Cruising Boat ? morrobay Monohull Sailboats 16 05-08-2010 10:45
Safest place to board your boat. Sea Maid Auxiliary Equipment & Dinghy 10 26-08-2008 10:11
Safest Multihull's for Ocean Passages Lundy Multihull Sailboats 6 10-07-2007 23:12



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 23:53.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.