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Old 24-07-2010, 14:14   #16
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Flat bottoms. Think of swimming and the difference between diving in and doing a belly flop. I'd rather a hull that "dives" than endure endless belly flops. The Jeanneau has a 9 and 1/2 foot beam - huge - and displaces 5,200 pounds. I've never sailed one, but can tell you with some degree of confidence that it is a fair weather boat that will not take care of you when things get snotty. A blast on a pretty Saturday, I'm sure, but not appropriate for 30 days at sea, in my opinion.
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Old 24-07-2010, 14:16   #17
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Even for inter-island, go with something sturdier....
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Old 24-07-2010, 14:28   #18
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drew sturdier does sound better. What little i have learned is I'm not looking for speed I'm looking for a boat which is going to sail well in bad weather. thanks again
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Old 24-07-2010, 14:34   #19
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Cape Dory 28 all the way....
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Old 24-07-2010, 14:46   #20
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drew sturdier does sound better. What little i have learned is I'm not looking for speed I'm looking for a boat which is going to sail well in bad weather. thanks again
As your first boat (and with limited practical experiance?) I would very strongly recomended buying with at least 1 eye on............selling.

By that I mean think carefully about buying the perfect boat for you - especially as could be tempting on price for the very good reason that the market is limited - definately the seller and possibly you Might pay a bit more, but should be reflected in both sale value and ease of sale. or ability to sell at all (at least within a reasonable timescale). Why sell? 99% certain that your ideas of the perfect boat will change after your own experiances.......

Another set of compromises to consider
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Old 24-07-2010, 14:54   #21
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David has a good point. Not only is this good advice for newbies, but also for old dogs too, when they move into different waters and different cruising needs.

And now the usual references - look for small boats, check market and price to narrow

Atom Voyages | Voyages Aboard the Sailboat Atom -* Good Old Boats List - choosing a* small voyaging sailboat
Mahina Expedition - Offshore Cruising Instruction
Best Cruisers
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Old 24-07-2010, 14:57   #22
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DOJ very good point. I keep thinking it would be great to buy the first boat and refit her over a period of 5 years says this is not feasible. I am a builder of very high end quality so the actual work is not daunting to say the least. It does seem like the 2 or 3 boat plan seems to fit my experience level as I have come to conclusion after reading posts of hundreds of people who have or are in the same boat as me.
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Old 24-07-2010, 15:35   #23
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Flat bottoms. Think of swimming and the difference between diving in and doing a belly flop. I'd rather a hull that "dives" than endure endless belly flops. The Jeanneau has a 9 and 1/2 foot beam - huge - and displaces 5,200 pounds. I've never sailed one, but can tell you with some degree of confidence that it is a fair weather boat that will not take care of you when things get snotty. A blast on a pretty Saturday, I'm sure, but not appropriate for 30 days at sea, in my opinion.
I did my Coastal Skipper cse on her larger sister an Attalia and would agree with Drew. Light, fast even in light airs they are very pleasant to sail. However they must be reefed early when it starts to blow.

Whilst I have no idea what the sailing conditions are like in Honolulu, you won't be crossing to the US in a Fantasia.

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Old 24-07-2010, 15:55   #24
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Page 3 of http://www.hilo-sailing.org/newslett...er-Jun2009.pdf starts the article and it is continued to page 7. It continues with Fishing from the Boat and goes on to about page 9. It certainly is about the sailing you'll want to be doing and the island you'll want to visit first, Lanai, so read it. It has to be great 'cause I wrote it. The boat pictured in the article is a Columbia 28.
Happy boat hunting.
regards,
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Old 24-07-2010, 16:08   #25
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Because of the sea state and
the first night underway there
wasn’t any sleep, just a muscle
relaxing 6 hours spent
jammed in wherever we
could fit ourselves to rest
before the next watch.
Great article, SkprJohn! All the more reason to choose a seakindly vessel....
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Old 24-07-2010, 16:21   #26
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drew sturdier does sound better. What little i have learned is I'm not looking for speed I'm looking for a boat which is going to sail well in bad weather. thanks again
International Folkboat ... forget the Jeanneau. I think you'll find the Folkboat in John Vigor's "20 Sailboats ..." book. Since you aren't living aboard full time the limited interior space is not a big factor, and don't get hung up on 26 vs 28 feet. The Folkboat is a great sailer and will definitely go to weather. The Contessa 26 is based on the Folkboat and look what its done. And all that new equipment on it ..... hmmm, hmmm.

Probably the best thing you are going to find in Hawaii in that price range and size.
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Old 24-07-2010, 17:34   #27
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I bought my first boat almost two years ago, a 1978 Pearson 26. It's been a great boat and, at just $3,000 fully equipped with new sails and in great shape, a good value as well. I found it on Craigslist. Since then, I have put in at least three times that amount on maintainance and a few upgrades. Even now, my much improved boat would probably not sell for much more than I paid for it. This is my point: you will not save any money by looking for a 'fixer-upper'. Look for an old boat in very good or excellent shape with lots of extras, even if it costs more than market value. Something somebody poured way too much money into. This may seem counter intuitive to a first time owner, but fixing problems is a lot more costly than avoiding them in the first place. Good luck!
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Old 24-07-2010, 18:18   #28
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DOJ very good point. I keep thinking it would be great to buy the first boat and refit her over a period of 5 years says this is not feasible. I am a builder of very high end quality so the actual work is not daunting to say the least. It does seem like the 2 or 3 boat plan seems to fit my experience level as I have come to conclusion after reading posts of hundreds of people who have or are in the same boat as me.
Of course not to say you won't be the exception that proves the rule Might hit it spot on first time out of the trap . Or you realise your first choice was not "the one" to, say, visit the mainland USA - but you change your mind anyway about wanting to do that, so it don't matter.

Having a few skills in the toolbox already always helps - but I would suggest just as important is enjoying the work (or at least getting some sort of satisfaction out of it)........otherwise it's worse than work - as you don't get paid

And don't discount staying in your own locale as not "proper" sailing or as unadventurous and get all consumed by going somewhere / anywhere (ok, I know this is CF.com )........because when you arrive their will be a sailor whose life dream is to reach where you have just left (wherever that is). To you a small group of islands just off the coast of France / Europe may sound exotic and alluring because of that (or it might not of course ) and so far out of reach by boat as to be a part of a distant dream to reach under your own keel. For me it's kinda dull but nonethless plenty enough sailing challenges to last me / anyone a lifetime.

For me your backyard is much the same - and with a Volcano how cool is that?!
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Old 24-07-2010, 18:22   #29
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This is my point: you will not save any money by looking for a 'fixer-upper'. Look for an old boat in very good or excellent shape with lots of extras, even if it costs more than market value. Something somebody poured way too much money into. This may seem counter intuitive to a first time owner, but fixing problems is a lot more costly than avoiding them in the first place. Good luck!
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Old 24-07-2010, 18:35   #30
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Yep, I'll chime in again. During the '90's, a buddy of mine sold his shop in NY and bought a 35-footer in Florida to live aboard. He was a gifted carpenter and a mechanical genius. His boat came dirt cheap from a DEA auction. He had to redo everthing, which he did himself, at decades-low 1990's commodity prices. Stupid cheap stainless, copper, brass, etc. My buddy drowned on a bad SCUBA dive, but got to live his dream for five years. Told me himself it's cheaper to buy a serviceable vessel than to bring one back from the dead. May he rest in peace.
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