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Old 25-06-2019, 17:50   #1
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Lightbulb When to pull the trigger

Im having a hard time knowing when to pull the trigger on making an offer for sailboat for cruising (eventually bluewater).

I know that Id be waiting forever for the perfect used boat, with the right price to be on the market. And I know that I should buy a boat closest to cruising ready. But, those ideas are at odds, and Im not sure where to draw the line.

Does this boat seem too far away from being ready to cruise?

We are currently looking at this T37: https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/198...utter-3550714/

Pros
  • Great condition
  • Never had teak decks
  • Has windvane
  • Has a small dinghy
  • Many issues with older boats has been taken care of (e.g. black iron fuel tanks, now stainless)

Cons
  • Needs electronics ($8k-12k)
  • Needs staysail (roughly $2,500 +-$800)
  • Needs liferaft (offshore roughly starts at $2,500, then $700 cradle)
  • More modern anchor (nice to have)
  • Heavy storm anchor ($1,300-$1,600)
  • Outboard for dinghy
  • Inverter
  • GPS
  • Solar panels, and a location to put them (Was thinking of davits with solar on top)
  • Autopilot is older, and current owners never used it, so its unclear if any part of the system can be used.
  • There 4200 hours on the Perkins 4-108 diesel, but the owner says she runs great, and 50hp is pretty nice on this displacement.

Im fine with buying the electronics, since new same brand electronics communicate with each other easier, and installing them myself would give me a better understanding how the whole boat is wired. And the solar, since the rate at which solar panel technology improves is quick.

My biggest concern is that the autopilot would have to be replaced. Im having a hard time pricing that out, but I suspect its expensive. (anybody have a quick estimate?).

And Im not sure what davits with solar panel mounts would be either (see https://www.sailkalyra.com/2017/08/1...pics/img_4142/). I know that a custom arch could be upwards of $15k!

The diesel has some pretty high hours (4200). I know that a well maintained diesel can last for 8,000, but the average is closer to 5,000, and the engine photos dont give me much confidence. Repowering would be an expensive venture.

We are getting close to half the price of the boat, just to outfit her. And I feel like that might be a low estimate.

This Tayana is honestly the closest weve found in the two years weve been seriously looking at boats. Almost all of our preferred models at the age we can afford need new decks.

What do you think? Should I wait for a boat that is closer to ready? Or should I make a low offer, and if taken, use the money to outfit her? If we got her for ~$45k, that would give us a good chunk of money to do the other work (assuming that work is less than $50k or so).
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Old 26-06-2019, 01:12   #2
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Hi and welcome to CF

What a great boat, the woodwork down below looks really nice and I would be very pleased to have a boat looking like this. The diesel heater, full canopy and wind vane are nice extra touches you could end up having to pay for if you buy another yacht.

Sadly Americans seem to have to pay a fortune for liferafts. You probably don't want to see this:

https://www.marinesuperstore.com/lif...iser-liferafts

Your price for electronics seems incredibly high, what were you thinking of buying? Add a new Raymarine chart plotter and radar but keep the ST60s and link into the autopilot would be 1/3rd of the amount you are looking at. AIS also needed at $800 or so. Sell the old Radar on here as they fetch good money.

I hear what you say about the engine, but its a perkins and very popular. In time it might need a re-build or replaced with a recon engine but doesn't have to be new.

I would sail the boat for a year before thinking about reverting to the cutter rig. You may find it quite satisfactory with a 120% genoa which isn't over sized.

Custom solar arches start at 1000 this side of the pond, more if you want something really special. Even with the panels that should come in under $3000 with MPPT controllers.

The anchor well have a read of CF and choose a new modern large anchor and keep either the Delta but only if its original or the Bruce, again only if its original. Cost depending on size and model $800.

Assuming the asking price is reasonable, that is a very nice boat, that doesn't look to need much doing. You could go now and sail her as the two previous owners have done.

Pete
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Old 26-06-2019, 01:24   #3
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Can't offer much advice but that our Perkins Prima M80T when we bought the boat had almost 8000 hours on it, and still ran like a champ. I overhauled it (nothing but trouble since) but I bet I could have gotten another 1000 or 2 hours out of her.
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Old 26-06-2019, 01:30   #4
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Re: When to pull the trigger

If the chainplates are original they will probably need to be replaced.
You don't mention your cruising plans or time frame. As soon as you purchase you will get the joy of owning along with the monthly bills. Tayana 37s are generally a pretty well priced for cruising boats, but they show their age.
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Old 26-06-2019, 01:42   #5
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, madworld.
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Old 26-06-2019, 04:14   #6
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Looks like you could sail her now and slowly replace the things you'd like, as needed.

She's pretty beautiful. You've seen her in person, right? You're not just going by the Yachtworld photos? The reason I ask is there may be additional unknowns like peculiar smells once you get on board... and what do the bilges look like?

Fair winds! Hope you will soon be a new boat owner!
Warmly,
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Old 26-06-2019, 04:45   #7
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Quote:
Originally Posted by madworld View Post

This Tayana is honestly the closest weve found in the two years weve been seriously looking at boats.

What do you think?
I think you aren't ready to buy a boat. You have looked for 2 years and the closest boat you have found is a boat you need to be talked into.
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Old 26-06-2019, 05:08   #8
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Get a survey. Include testing on the engine (compression, maybe oil analysis), because whether Perkins engines have a good reputation or not, your concern is this engine, not the average, and that sucker will be expensive.

Sailor Boy's point is well taken.

Welcome.
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Old 26-06-2019, 07:19   #9
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailorboy1 View Post
I think you aren't ready to buy a boat. You have looked for 2 years and the closest boat you have found is a boat you need to be talked into.


madboy, you're hesitating and questioning all the little details and trying to convince yourself one way or the other.

It's called "analysis paralysis."

We all get it at times. When the time is right everything will just fall into place. But my best advice is make sure that the purchase price + some basic repair/maintain $ + one year of moorage fees, doesn't hurt you financially.
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Old 26-06-2019, 07:26   #10
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Your 'Cons' List is going to be the same for 98% of the boats you look at. Just assume you will be updating electronics, Solar, Dinghy/motor, some standing and running rigging and some sails.

Buying a boat for the electronics or the dinghy is like buying a house for the appliances.

You're looking in the wrong places.
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Old 26-06-2019, 08:00   #11
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete7 View Post
Hi and welcome to CF

What a great boat, the woodwork down below looks really nice and I would be very pleased to have a boat looking like this. The diesel heater, full canopy and wind vane are nice extra touches you could end up having to pay for if you buy another yacht.

Sadly Americans seem to have to pay a fortune for liferafts. You probably don't want to see this:

https://www.marinesuperstore.com/lif...iser-liferafts

Your price for electronics seems incredibly high, what were you thinking of buying? Add a new Raymarine chart plotter and radar but keep the ST60s and link into the autopilot would be 1/3rd of the amount you are looking at. AIS also needed at $800 or so. Sell the old Radar on here as they fetch good money.

I hear what you say about the engine, but its a perkins and very popular. In time it might need a re-build or replaced with a recon engine but doesn't have to be new.

I would sail the boat for a year before thinking about reverting to the cutter rig. You may find it quite satisfactory with a 120% genoa which isn't over sized.

Custom solar arches start at 1000 this side of the pond, more if you want something really special. Even with the panels that should come in under $3000 with MPPT controllers.

The anchor well have a read of CF and choose a new modern large anchor and keep either the Delta but only if its original or the Bruce, again only if its original. Cost depending on size and model $800.

Assuming the asking price is reasonable, that is a very nice boat, that doesn't look to need much doing. You could go now and sail her as the two previous owners have done.

Pete
Thank you Pete!

All of my estimates are pretty loose. The electronics are probably too high. I've tried to put some padding in as well, since many boat projects end up costing more than expected. While I've been sailing all my life, I've never owned a boat, so most of this is new to me. What about the autopilot? I feel that is a necessity for cruising.

This community is continually impressing me with their generosity of knowledge!

Madison
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Old 26-06-2019, 08:46   #12
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Re: When to pull the trigger

Quote:
Originally Posted by madworld View Post

What do you think? Should I wait for a boat that is closer to ready? Or should I make a low offer, and if taken, use the money to outfit her? If we got her for ~$45k, that would give us a good chunk of money to do the other work (assuming that work is less than $50k or so).
Tell me, did you make the boats to consider decision based on a "book"?

You are talking spending $95K for a 1983 Tanya 37. That's a 1970s era heavy displacement design. It's a nice boat if that's your thing, but there's so many other choices for $95k.
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Old 26-06-2019, 09:22   #13
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Re: When to pull the trigger

look at what the boat has got and what you think its worth and make an offer based on that , nice boat go for it your getting older
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Old 26-06-2019, 09:42   #14
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Re: When to pull the trigger

HEY AND WELCOME ,
Just my thoughts , your estimation for gear is well out , insanly so you are been sucked into the comercial world of boatyness

That is you need ot keep upgrading your electronics beceause ! well because some one says so , but who are these mysteries peoples

I have a 24 inch screen , a 10 inch screen a small net book all running Open cpn
second hand AIS (top brand), and upgraded the radar to run on OPCPN

This all cost $2500 dollars

all instruments from NASA Marine UK most on the boat still work
Perkins engine of that class were built to last , where did you get the 8000 hours from , I have heard of and read of many Sail drives needing replaced around 5000 hours , but a good perkins will last you a life time if looked after.
5800 hour on my 43 year old perkins 4236 no issues 8 Knots cruisng

Do not get into an anochor debate decent spades and CQRs and second hands out there

How much solar do you need for a small boat 400 amps is plenty and less if your frugal were are you getting your arch price from , get yourself a fabricator who will do it for less

15k for your davits !! why have then in the first place , the owner has their dinghy on the forepeak why not you

There is a wind vane why are you needing to upgrade the autopilot ,Im assuming it has one and if not around $3000

Do not get sucked into it no need madness
but your money and she is a lovely Boat , priced for that reason an owner has looked after her and I suspect you will be hard pressed lowering the price . a boat is not priced on its electronics and sails and autopilots ,
Any way good luck and stay sensible with it
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Old 26-06-2019, 10:01   #15
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Re: When to pull the trigger

I would not worry too much about the engine hours. a well maintained 4 108 will run twice those hours. The life raft we use is a sailing dingy with tubes. It's always ready and not hidden away in a canister.
It's a great boat in good condition, what are you waiting for?
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