Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 06-11-2005, 07:56   #16
Registered User
 
capt lar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Boat: currently "on the beach"
Posts: 729
Images: 12
paul - thou shalt not desire luxury, thou shalt cast off junk, thou shalt be modest in needs and practical in spares carried and thou shalt save 100k.

as long as a boat is just a boat, it can be done. when a boat becomes a primary home, especially if that home will voyage, i think you enter a completely different conversation. i have been trying to find the answer to the "how big does a liveaboard need to be" and my feeling so far is at least 38 and ideally - 50 ! for me it is a question of how much volume i need to feel comfortable. cruising for a few weeks or month is no problem. permanent is a different deal. this is where cats start to look really good. add 200k.
capt. lar
__________________

__________________
Larry

We have met the enemy and he is us. - Walt Kelly
capt lar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 10:55   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 341
Send a message via Skype™ to gosstyla
I somewhat agree with capt lar.

When determining the size of my boat I decided that 40ft was the minimum I would be comfortable with considering performance and safety. Also, I decided that the house layout and size would fit in a 40ft, although I had never seen a 40ft with that type layout.

However, when I considered payload the FP Bahia 46ft and Lagoon 470 were the smallest production boats I found that were sufficient.

I finally decided on a 47ft in which I have the house layout and size that would fit in the 40ft.

If money was no object I probably would have added another 10ft to the hulls without changing the house layout or size.
__________________

__________________
gosstyla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 11:02   #18
Registered User
 
capt lar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Boat: currently "on the beach"
Posts: 729
Images: 12
gosstyla - i don't disagree. i did one longer voyage on a 72 footer, and it was too small after a while. it is a very personal issue - finding that balance.
i have lived aboard, but in a home port, and again, this is not the same since you have friends w/homes and a car and all the rest of the supports.
i have never really cut the lines.

capt. lar
__________________
Larry

We have met the enemy and he is us. - Walt Kelly
capt lar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 12:36   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
Weight and water line length are great for smoothing out the bumps and bruises and the larger boat will stand up to it's canvas better.

That being said, when reefing, we don't bother with a single reef but go right to a double tuck. By doing this we can substantially reduce sail and if things get ugly we roll away the jib which is 100% and go to the innner forestay.

With this combo we are good to about 45 upwind. You simply can not do this with a smaller lighter boat because the weight is not their to carry you into the sea.

This is what has worked for us. Try different combo's to see what works for you when sailing into a breeze.

Good luck.
__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 21:44   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Lancaster, Pa., USA
Boat: none
Posts: 23
Since I will be single-handed, my first concern is sail handling. I want a boat that I can easily reduce sail in a blow by myself. Also, maintenance expense is another concern since my estimated cruising budget will be about $1,400-$1,500 per month. I agree with Gord and others who stated that whatever size boat you have it will be filled to capacity and then some ( the more space, the more stuff---just like a house ). I'm looking to simplify my lifestyle which also means, NO USELESS JUNK! So to that extent, smaller may be better ( less space to accumulate junk ), but it will also be my only home for who knows how long and so I don't want to feel like I'm living in a pup-tent. Bottom line is, I guess (as some have stated ) that I will just have to experience different boats to see what I'm comfortable with. I'm guessing though something along the lines of a 24-28 LWL, medium displacement.

Scott
__________________
Scott k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 22:15   #21
Registered User
 
BC Mike's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Gabriola BC
Boat: Viking 33 Tanzer 8.5m Tanzer 22
Posts: 1,034
Images: 5
24 to 28 LWL

Scott I think you are right on the money.
A moderate displacement as you describe will give you a boat of 28 feet to 36 feet. I have a 28 foot boat that is about the same size as most 30 foot boats. It has everything needed to sail well, BUT it can get a bit crowded if spending a lot of time on board. Also the slightly longer waterline will maintain a bit faster speed. For me looking to go bigger with out too much work or exspense it will be a 34 to 36 foot boat with a 28 or more LWL. Boat weight maximum about 12000- pounds. As for the big boats handling rough conditions better, that is true, BUT a surfboard handles really big waves better than a 47 foot sailboat, and a 35 foot boat was first overall on handicap in the 98 Sydney Hobart race.
Then there is the anchoring and all the other things that cost moree $$ and effort on a bigger boat.
Michael
__________________
BC Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 13:01   #22
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,594
IF you plan to single hand you MUST have a boat that will heave to, period. If your boat won't heave to you'll be forced to sail even when it's not the smart thing to do.
I'd recommend a full keel, attached rudder, narrow beam, possibly an Alberg design.
Also get the SMALLEST boat that will get the job done. NOT the biggest you can afford. Put the extra cash to use sailing off in the smaller boat.

Want to be able to cruise in hurricane alley during hurricane season? Get a boat you can trailer yourself. If a storm comes a calling, find a public ramp and pull her out and head inland. All the big boats will be fighting for a hurricane hole to hide out in or waiting in the marina to get smashed.

Best wishes

randy Cape Dory 25D w/ trailer!!!
__________________
rtbates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 14:58   #23
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Aloha Scott,
My right answer is 33 to 35 give or take a foot here and there but look for the right design. Some are smaller inside than others with the same amount of deck length. A lot of us have posted answers to this question in other threads so look around.
Regards, --John--
__________________
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 15:32   #24
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,577
Images: 240
Twenty-Eight Foot, Six & One Quarter inches, Length Overall.
Four Foot, Eleven & Seven Sixteenths inches Draft.
Nine Foot, Nine inches Beam.
Fouty One Foot even Air Draft.
All figures within Five Hundred Percent Accuracy.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 15:43   #25
cruiser

Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,167
how big a boat

My last boat was a 29 footer which I lived aboard for ten years mostly in BC, before building my current boat, a 31 footer, which I have lived aboard for 22 years .. Both were plenty big enough.
It's easier to get a smaller ego than aquire a bigger boat. Spend the diffference cruising. I do 11 months a year while those with bigger egos go to work to make boat payments.
I listen to them in the morning traffic reports before going back to sleep for another hour or two.
Brent
__________________
Brent Swain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 15:43   #26
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Gord May has answered the question correctly. He is only off by 4 to 6 feet but within an acceptable 500 percent range. I once was in love with an Allied Seawind Ketch. Would have tracked nicely without constantly minding tiller or helm.
Regards, --John--
__________________
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 16:36   #27
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tasmania
Boat: VandeStadt IOR 40' - Insatiable
Posts: 2,317
Images: 91
However big a boat you buy, you will end up filling it with stuff to just beyond the point where it feels a little bit cluttered!

Personally, I like a big boat for off-shore use in heavy weather...for me that means 36' or more. However, the biger the boat, the bigger and heavier the gear / sails, so potentially it can be a lot harder to sail.

In my opinion, with the plethora of fancy instrumentation and communication equipment available these days at reasonable prices, there is actually no reason to be stuck out there in a storm unless you choose to be. With good radios, chart plotters, weatherfax, etc, you should (unless you are trying to cross the Atlantic) be able to get accurate weather forecasting information far enough in advance to be snugged up in the lee of an Island or in a sheltered bay or marina long before the weather turns nasty....there to stay, until the weather improves.

So, having said that, perhaps you do not need such a big boat. However, if you are going to be living on board, it would certaily be nice to have some room to swing a cat and store some stuff. My recommendation would be not less than 28 and not more than 34 - personally, I wold suggest, perhaps, looking at an S&S 34...
__________________
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 21:39   #28
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
Well put GORD. We had plenty of room for all of our stuff on our first boat, a 34' wooden ketch. When we moved onto our 40' Plastic fantastic, we looked around and realized we had so much space "we could never fill it up"(Yea, right) We have been moving stuff off this boat to get ready to sell her and move onto the trimaran. We have taken three truckloads off the boat, and it has not affected our day to day living. It is amazing how much crap you can collect in a few years. My rule of, nothing goes on board the boat unless it has a permanent place, has not prevented us from collecting way more stuff than we actually need on the 40' ketch.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 22:19   #29
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Aloha Weyalan et al.,
I don't think any amount of electronic gear will ever allow a sailor to outrun a storm. You'll be able to prepare and know more or less what is coming but you won't outrun one if it is headed your way.
A good radio and a cautious eye to weather will keep you in port when you should be and let you know what is coming if you're out there.
Regards, --John--
__________________
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-06-2006, 22:25   #30
Senior Cruiser

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,453
Kai ... how many truck loads were Susan's clothes??? O: )
__________________

__________________
S/V Elusive is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Nigel Caulder on Hoses GordMay Construction, Maintenance & Refit 19 30-06-2015 13:14
Island Packet 31 for Liveaboard / Offshore? Gray Monohull Sailboats 33 01-09-2013 07:26
Do Boats Have 'Souls' ? sail_the_stars General Sailing Forum 77 14-11-2010 15:25
A Primer on Fiberglass Construction Jeff H Construction, Maintenance & Refit 25 17-11-2005 11:21



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:10.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.