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Old 27-03-2009, 15:04   #31
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Sea miles must be considered as to actual age of vessel.A boat that has many offshore miles will be way older than the same boat used for weekend getaways.Fiberglass flexes,and over many years of heavy sailing will be fatigued.
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Old 27-03-2009, 15:54   #32
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Old is not always a bad thing!!!

Give me an old boat any time, if looked after they will give their owner many years of pleasure. The other good thing is that in a busy anchorage you always know which is your boat, the pretty one over there!

The white hulled sloop is a S & S sloop built in Havana Cuba in 1942

The Blue hulled boat is a S & S yawl built in Holland in 1962

Both are still going strong!
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Old 27-03-2009, 17:07   #33
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Too old

My friend Otto is 85 he decided this year he is too old to sail any more at least on his own boat. As far as boats go don't ever buy a boat from a sailor that hates to work on the boat. It means they probably didn't. That could be a problem should you sell your boat.

I find I like it more than I thought I would and do much more of it than I ever dreamed would be required and always have things that need to be done. When you like being on the boat enough it's OK to be doing some work. You sail a few hours and come back to port. You hang around the dock a little and drink a beer. Watch the neighbors drop tools in the water and all sorts of other fun stuff and drink someone else's beer. Next thing you know it's time to go home.
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Old 27-03-2009, 17:50   #34
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I know people with new boats who just sail hard and ignore the maintenance side. That boat gets old very quickly!

Paul has it exactly right. It is all about your “attitude” when you own a boat as to managing it’s maintenance and repairs.

In my mind I trade-off what I would be doing if not working on my boat at the marina. Mowing the lawn / commuting to work / watching a game show / cooking dinner for my mother in law……

None of those chores appeal to me …and that's my point!
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Old 27-03-2009, 19:15   #35
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In my mind I trade-off what I would be doing if not working on my boat at the marina. Mowing the lawn / commuting to work / watching a game show / cooking dinner for my mother in law……
I just hate mowing the lawn late There comes a point where being on the boat in the slip is better than not sailing. Real life happens and being on the boat is better than that. After enough time just the idea of being on the boat makes it. It may not be better than sex but it beats mowing the lawn. You can do your own math when you own your own boat!
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Old 28-03-2009, 17:58   #36
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Pblais: I like the way you think!
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Old 28-03-2009, 20:22   #37
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This thread reminds me of a couple of high school kids trying to tell their mom why they were out so late... There is no logical reason for it, being on a boat is just fun! It is like skipping school... really we are just skipping responsibilities.
Being on a boat is a nomadic wonderful existence, even if you do all the work yourself (which I do because I am too cheap to pay someone else to do it)
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Old 28-03-2009, 21:04   #38
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It is like skipping school... really we are just skipping responsibilities.
Sometimes they come back and it's just a mini vacation. A totally clean escape seems more like a dream.
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Old 02-04-2009, 11:12   #39
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To old to insure

I sail a 1976 Pearson 365 Ketch on the US Gulf Coast. Insurance has been a big hassle. I can't tell you how many times I've been told, too big (35' seems to be the magic number) and/or too old ( no magic number given). If insurabilty is important to you, Check around before you buy.
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Old 02-04-2009, 13:40   #40
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I am going to go through that in a couple of weeks. I will let you know how it turns out. Is US boat a good source?
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Old 04-04-2009, 01:05   #41
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Refitting old boats: overcapitalizing?

The age of the boat matters, but if the hull is in pristine condition, the rigging is well balanced and strong, and the boat has that ephemeral quality, beauty, then -in my view- overhauling or refitting the engine, updating the navigation instruments, in short giving new life to a good boat, makes great sense.

This, of course, if life priorities rate sailing as high as for my wife and me.

After 13 years without a sailing boat, we bought a 12-metre, 1984, Australian-designed and built fibreglass cutter.

She is a marvel.

The engine is a 24 y.o, 1770hrs Mercedes Solè, and we are going to change it for a new 55HP Yanmar (or Volvo?) to have more security when cruising. The electronics are also vintage, and need changing. A new electric windlass. Self-tacking staysail, recut and overhauled.

Overcapitalizing? Yes, probably. But only a bit, maybe 15% of the boats potential current resale value.

Isn't it all part of the price one is prepared to pay for one of the great joys of lifea? Yet, nowadays, not via credit card!



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Old 04-04-2009, 01:44   #42
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we are going to change it for a new 55HP Yanmar (or Volvo?)
Paolo
At Pittwater, in Sydney, Australia.
Paolo,

go the Yanmar but get quotes from various Yanmar agents.
The people on the Gold Coast were good for a small job we got done.
The cost + Instalation could be worth a trip up or down the coast.
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Old 04-04-2009, 03:13   #43
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Paolo,

go the Yanmar but get quotes from various Yanmar agents.
The people on the Gold Coast were good for a small job we got done.
The cost + Instalation could be worth a trip up or down the coast.


Thanks, MarkJ.

It seems the general consensus: Yanmar 55hp although a bit more expensive (my quotes: +$1200 over Volvo 55Hp) for reasons not altogether clear, has the edge.

Will certainly email the Gold Coast people.

Yanmar apparently now fits a AC generator on the flywheel, but is as expensive as a $7000 separate generator. Not worth it for our use.

Althought, we need to use a Mac laptop for professional reasons: an inverter?

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Old 04-04-2009, 03:23   #44
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This thread reminds me of a couple of high school kids trying to tell their mom why they were out so late... There is no logical reason for it, being on a boat is just fun! It is like skipping school... really we are just skipping responsibilities.
Being on a boat is a nomadic wonderful existence, even if you do all the work yourself (which I do because I am too cheap to pay someone else to do it)

There is an element of that!

I was wondering today why it is so light and pleasurable just pottering around on the boat.

Probably because it is a temporary abandonment of the heaviness of responsibility?



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Old 04-04-2009, 06:08   #45
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The feeling, howsoever illusory, of freedom. Being master of one's own territory. Being in charge of something tangible in a pretty chaotic world. Just sitting there in the sunshine cleaning out an old toilet stopcock with the sea breeze on your face. Someone from the boat on the other side of the pontoon coming aboard with two mugs of coffee. Just sitting there enjoying what is beautiful, what is true in this world.

Escapism? Yeah, a bit. Adventure? Yup. Achievement when the lightship you were looking for comes up fine on the bow? The sense of snugness and comfort of a quiet anchorage after a lumpy crossing.

It's sometimes different things to different people. It's all these things, and much much more.
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