Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-04-2009, 16:02   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,413
I haven't read this thread, but my approach would be to first shop for a really good broker who knows boats and the kind of sailing you intend to do and let him earn his commission (from the seller) and find you boats and filter for you, get all the info and then serve you up one or two that are worth seeing. You should be pretty close to wanting the boat before you lay eyes on it from all the research and communications.

Then if it looks good you get a surveyor who will earn his fee and save you some money and really dig into the boat as a professional would. And chances are he's surveyed similar boats. He sticks his nose boats every day (like a broker) so you need this sort of professional assistance. If you have tons of experience... even with one, two or three boats, it helps to have a pro on the buy team.

Walking the docks and looking for for sale signs seems a crazy way to do this or flying off half way rounf the globe based on some internet ad.
__________________

__________________
Sandero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2009, 19:23   #32
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Australia
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 311
Posts: 133
Have a cousin in Florida I could perhaps visit to defray some cost (plus he's great fun) but haven't given up on getting a boat in Australia. I'm not ruling any method out, but yes I've been introducing myself to brokers over here and letting them know what I'm interested in.

Story: I flew American Airlines last time between Australia and thee US. The 747 was dirty and in 'poor nick.' The stewardess explained that drinks were $7 and the Australian's aboard were shocked and asked why. The stu replied "because were going bankrupt." Plus you often find long queues checing in - especially at NY La Guardia. I hear they are considering charging extra for use of the bathrooms during flights...
__________________

__________________
RigelKent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2009, 20:18   #33
Registered User
 
Arch Stanton's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Olympia, WA
Boat: San Juan 28
Posts: 214
Long time lurker reporting in:

I'm a 29 year old dude in Olympia, WA. I do computer work at a hospital here.

To make sure it wasn't just a romantic idea in my head, I joined a local sailing club and took the ASA certification classes and have been taking their boats out very regularly, including overnight. Budd Inlet isn't very exciting, but it has been very very educational.

So far I'm still in.

I am graduating from The Evergreen State College next year with a B.S. in Comp. Sci. My plan is to pick up coding jobs that I can do from anywhere, and pay the bills that way. I own a house, and can keep it for about $300 a month while I'm gone if I rent it out.

The boats that are turning me on the most right now are Island Packet, Gozzard and Pacific Seacraft.

I can feasibly buy a good, small (<32'), used one in the next 2-4 years.

If I wasn't opposed to financing a boat, I would buy this right now, because it is exactly what I want:

Most Beautiful Sailboat in the World
__________________
Arch Stanton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2009, 20:20   #34
Registered User
 
Arch Stanton's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Olympia, WA
Boat: San Juan 28
Posts: 214
Wow, I just realized I have been reading this site for over a year.
__________________
Arch Stanton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2009, 21:22   #35
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Australia
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 311
Posts: 133
Yeah I can see that, there is so much to read here, let alone creating new posts.

You might start out by getting work with regular computer folk you can work alongside and network with. As their confidence and reliance on you grows they will become more comfortable with you working remotely.

Looking at the various freelance websites, most RFT offers are starvation wages by US standards.

I just concluded arrangements to start work with a consulting group here in Perth, so I'm setting my sights on a slightly better used sailboat, possibly a more recent local Benneteau 36' or equivalent I could slip in Fremantle. It will be local cruising for me until I get a lot more proficient. Studying up with my teacher to eventually get my certification.
__________________
RigelKent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2009, 21:39   #36
Registered User
 
roger.waite's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Plimmerton, New Zealand
Boat: Samsara, a Ross 930
Posts: 380
My 'myth buster' would be that you have to step right onto the ideal cruising boat.

If you don't know a lot about boats, and particularly if you are not ready to go long-range cruising right now, perhaps buy a moderate sized older boat for a year or two. Get out there for weeks or weekends at a time. Learn about what you need, vs. what you wanted. It will also teach new players lots about boat maintenance, etc.

I knew my boat was not the perfect cruising boat, but it was a great way of letting my partner decide whether she can handle life on the water. If she can handle me on 31', life on a 40 footer should be a breeze! :kissy:
__________________
roger.waite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2009, 01:01   #37
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger.waite View Post
If she can handle me on 31', life on a 40 footer should be a breeze!
Nah.


Its a scientific fact: Women can yell 41 feet


__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2009, 02:15   #38
Registered User
 
Hampus's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Sweden
Boat: Between boats
Posts: 463
Images: 6
Send a message via MSN to Hampus
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Nah.


Its a scientific fact: Women can yell 41 feet


Yeah, but most can't throw as far as 41 feet, which makes me happy. It's a problem though, when I'm chased out on the bowsprit with nowhere to go but down

I think three is a charm. The third boat you own is usually pretty much spot on. Then ofcaurse, circumstances can change and you might get other needs. My preference has always been well built and safe boats. The one I have on sale now is a 12000 lb 31 feet double ender. Roomy and very seaworthy. The one we just baught is an Island Trader 41 that feels just right for what we want. Maybe a bit more than what we need at the moment, but some day we might have kids and a lil doggy
__________________
http://adventureswithsyingeborg.blogspot.com/
On the way back to Sweden.
Hampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2009, 21:19   #39
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1
caught another lurker

I go on the site to read what insight people can give me about boats, but know that the best i can hope for is to get turned on to a boat that i have not yet considered. My wife and I would be interested in a 45 foot sloop for yearly trips to the Caribbean. She will be of safe, solid construction, comfortable (mostly her requirement) and will be fun to sail when I want to go out for a few days on my own. Most of my sailing has been on a Laser and a Hobie 18 and I had the most fun chartering a C&C 41. We are prepared to spend 250K, which puts us in the range of a 20 yr old Swan 46. I learned about a Stevens 47 from this site (I think) which has now made me think about Hylas. I appreciated the thread regarding center vs. aft cockpit as I certainly start with a definitive bias. I take everyone's advice and then get ready to fall in love with some boat and that one will be the one I end up with.
__________________
LiveFree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2009, 22:13   #40
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Australia
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 311
Posts: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger.waite View Post
My 'myth buster' would be that you have to step right onto the ideal cruising boat.
Yeah my worry is that I won't get a second chance to get aboard. But now I'm learning that the older boats can hold much of their value if they are in good shape to begin with and maintained. So the cost of learning what you need and what you really want shouldn't be to high if this fact continues to hold true.
__________________
RigelKent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2009, 22:26   #41
Registered User
 
roger.waite's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Plimmerton, New Zealand
Boat: Samsara, a Ross 930
Posts: 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Nah.


Its a scientific fact: Women can yell 41 feet


Ah yes, Grasshopper.

But it is the illusion that life is survivable, that makes it liveable.
__________________
roger.waite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2009, 13:36   #42
Registered User

Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7
I've been lurking for a few months, and I'll give you my story:

I'm currently 24 years old, and about to graduate from law school. After graduating, I'll be working for a firm in manhattan.

I've loved boats all of my life, but my family does not so my experience is limited to jaunts on friends' boats (none of them sail powered) and some light sailing on vacation. The biggest I've singlehanded is a 34' sloop, but the captain was standing right next to me.

I've wanted a boat for as long as I can remember, and now that I live by the water I finally have the chance to do so. However, I have 2 problems: (1) money and (2) time. I'm currently in the point in my life where I'm saving for a down payment for a house, paying off student loans, etc., and not really ready to make a big financial commitment. My second concern is time: I will be working long hours, and likely lots of weekends.

I generally fit the description of the person who impetuously buys a boat without doing enough homework, then has it sit in the marina for a couple years and fall into disrepair, then sell it at a loss. I'm trying to do enough homework so that I don't end up like that.

I'm not really looking to "cruise," I just want a weekender that I can take around New York bay on day trips, maybe take it down to the Jersey shore on the weekends in the summer, and perhaps take it through long island sound up to the Vineyard once a year.

I don't really know much about the intricacies of sailing (navigation, boat maintenance, etc), I just get the big picture of how to set the sails and make the boat go where I want.

The Weehawken headquarters of SailNY - New York City's Community Sailing Association is a half mile walk from my apartment in Hoboken, so I'll likely head over there this summer if I'm not too busy studying for the bar exam and try to hit them up for some knowledge.

I've been trying to cruise the site to get a little more info on what boats I should be looking for and whether this is even for me, but I can see that the discussion here is not really geared towards people like me.

I think that answered one or more of the questions, though in no specific order.
__________________
JMerc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2009, 15:24   #43
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMerc View Post
I'm currently 24 years old, and about to graduate from law school. After graduating, I'll be working for a firm in manhattan.
Isn't Manhattan a small island off the coast of the USA?

The sailing club link shows a huge page of fees.

And they are small racing boats called Solings. They were an Olympic class till 2000 and great fun to sail and very competative.

But you do get wet and cold!

There may be another yacht club near your island that races larger cruiser/racers. That can be great fun, and you might find some excellent business contacts at the bar (maybe some crims too!).

A big expensive yacht club can be a great way of learning and skippers are always on the lookout for crew, no matter how confident they look!


Mark
__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2009, 18:41   #44
Registered User

Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Isn't Manhattan a small island off the coast of the USA?
Yes, Manhattan is an island that is the main borough of New York.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
The sailing club link shows a huge page of fees.
Yes, but it's only $350US for a full season of unlimited racing, which should not only be a good way to hone my skills but also a good way to get some information about sailing in the area from the instructors.

As far as total money out of my pocket to keep a boat in the area, I'm seeing fees at local marinas at about $4,000 for a slip for the summer season (April to October) for a boat in the size I'm looking for (27'-36'). Keep in mind that I won't be living aboard, so I'm really looking at the purchase price of the boat, plus nominal maintenance (famous last words) and then the cost of the slip and winter storage.

Am I crazy to be doing this in this area? Is this a dream that has to wait another 40 years until I'm retired?
__________________
JMerc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2009, 19:08   #45
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Saipan, CNMI
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randyonr3 View Post
1. what kind of boat do you wish to own, and why
2. When do you plan on cutting the ropes and why
3. What misconceptions about the cruising lifestyles have you experenced
The hopes of this thread is to lay streight any ideas or misconceptions that might
lead someone astray or detur from cruising. You may include what you think you will have to have as far as money to leave..
Those that reply to the post on this thread, Please, speak from experance only.
1. I think I would like a catamaran between 36 and 46 feet. For me, it is mostly a space issue, as I plan on living aboard before I start jaunting around (and I do hope to do that). And maybe after, too. I would like the room for when (if ) the kids come to visit. Also space for extra crew/guests, because I do NOT think I would ever singlehand with my skillset (and the boats I want seem pretty big for one dude).

Also, it's kind of a nod to the whole Polynesian/Micronesian tradition (I live in the islands in the Pacific). But mostly because I think I would prefer the relative stability (not heeling too much). And at the age I plan on going (55 +) I don't think "condomaran" sounds too bad.

2. This, for me is easy. I have 2 kids under 4, and will have to wait until they are in or done with college (I also have a wife who can't swim, and certainly DOES NOT share the dream). So, I wait. I will leave no later than 20 years from today. (Man plans, God laughs, I know. But I do need a reason to keep going to the job I hate, and sailing off to the sunset is what got me to work this morning).

The dream is to putter around primarily around the Philippines (wife has a home there, and kids may go to college there) and while away the days of my retirement, and perhaps take my kids on extended sails whenever they want. Nothing grand like a circumnavigation, unless they were up for it.

3. Misconceptions? No clue. I would, however, offer a third way to the whole "go now vs. wait until you've saved more" debate. I chose the middle path. I took a huge cut in money (I'm a lawyer) to live and work in the tropical islands. Don't make $$$, but also work 40 hours a week, SCUBA whenever I want, and take the kids to the beach whenever they want. Pretty much all the things I imagine many cruisers dream about doing, I can do daily (when I'm not at work...ugh)
__________________

__________________
N.M.I.ke is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
boat

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Boat Recommendation - 35-45' Bluewater Boat with Two-Cabin Floor Plan ? capt.cam Dollars & Cents 33 19-02-2014 19:09
Cutter vs Sloop on My New Boat - or Is My Boat a Transrigged ? Ironhorse74 Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 1 09-05-2011 07:07
Boat Registration for German Partner in Brit Boat wassermann44 Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 0 30-03-2009 19:57
powersailer, diving boat, trailersailer, fishing boat, sailboat, powerboat, 12"draft BernieOdin820owner Fishing, Recreation & Fun 1 04-12-2007 18:56



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:26.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.