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Old 02-09-2008, 19:19   #1
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What are your opinions of Hunter yachts?

Curious as to the prevalence of Hunters among this crowd. I do not own one, and have not made plans to purchase one, but I do like them from what little I've seen (I do like the teak of the tiawan yachts too, but I also like NEW or NEWER for less pain-in-my-butt). I understand to say a boat is bluewater safe depends on how it's outfitted, but structurally and functionally is there any reason a Hunter could not be bluewater boats? I am specifically referring to the passage/legend/deck salon varieties 40'.

Aside from the small fuel tanks, I would say most everything seems right. I assume fabricating some 20/30 gallon reserve tanks in some nook or cranny might not be too hard or espensive either as well as adding a small water maker. Are the rigs too big for bluewater? Would a new mast be required?

- Joe
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Old 02-09-2008, 19:36   #2
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Pop the popcorn....

FWIW,

Here is a link to this topic on the Seven Seas Cruising Association forum.
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Old 02-09-2008, 19:50   #3
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Since I participated in the SSCA discussion I would encourage you to start there since you will get many of the same comments from the anti-Hunter and pro-Hunter groups here.
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Old 02-09-2008, 20:01   #4
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Real Blue water or pretend blue water? Lots in Bahamas and the Caribean. Not to many in the Azores. They are spacious. If you are not going to The Med or the southern ocean or who says you need " Bullet proof"
Spend some time on one before you think of getting one. I chartered one in the VI and found it had the most uncomfortable cockpit I have ever been in but it really was quick and comfy below.
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Old 02-09-2008, 20:25   #5
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Quote:
Curious as to the prevalence of Hunters among this crowd.
Its really about most people. Most people don't do long offshore passages or real blue water cruises. Being popular is not much of an indication except about what most people do. Boats really are built for a specific purpose and if you know your purpose then you can select the correct boat that works for you.
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Old 02-09-2008, 21:11   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JB_in_Fla View Post

Aside from the small fuel tanks, I would say most everything seems right. I assume fabricating some 20/30 gallon reserve tanks in some nook or cranny might not be too hard or espensive either as well as adding a small water maker. Are the rigs too big for bluewater? Would a new mast be required?
For a full time livaboard world cruiser I would not choose a Hunter.

For limited passage making and maybe an ocean delivery journey - no problem.

BTW - I feel the same about bavaria, jeneau, beneteau etc.

Just my opinion.
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Old 03-09-2008, 14:52   #7
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Thank you, I will head over to the SSCA discussion and read more. It sounds like there is some apprehension in most of the post about "serious" bluewater voyaging, I guess my curiousity is in the "why". This boat will likely be the one that takes me to the med - yes. I doubt it'll be a frequent migration, and not any time this decade, but an atlantic crossing or two is likely in the coming years and I don't want to sell and rebuy to do it. And no, my personal experience does not include any bluewater travels, at least not on anything that didn't say CARNIVAL on the side and have an LOA somewhere around 800 feet. So as a rookie, much explanation and insight is appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 03-09-2008, 16:31   #8
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After a quick read here's what I got:

Everyone likes their layouts
Their designs will 'rock n roll' more than others due to their goals (light, fast)

But seems the only real thing I could find that would make a Hunter seem less appealing is the lack of a full keel. Loosing a rudder would suck, and a full keel seems to be the best way to protect prop and rudder, along with the added tracking help.

So in a nutshell, the lack of the full keel really bums me. I've heard many stories of successful crossings in Hunters but unless you keep a spare rudder, and it happens to be nice weather when you loose it, having a ruder go south pretty much sends your boat down out there, unless you have a ketch.

Guess I'm just nervous to write that big a check on something as old as my alternate choices. A 20 year old boat scares me maintenance wise - I know what it can be on a new boat
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Old 03-09-2008, 16:39   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JB_in_Fla View Post
After a quick read here's what I got:

Everyone likes their layouts
Their designs will 'rock n roll' more than others due to their goals (light, fast)

But seems the only real thing I could find that would make a Hunter seem less appealing is the lack of a full keel. Loosing a rudder would suck, and a full keel seems to be the best way to protect prop and rudder, along with the added tracking help.

So in a nutshell, the lack of the full keel really bums me. I've heard many stories of successful crossings in Hunters but unless you keep a spare rudder, and it happens to be nice weather when you loose it, having a ruder go south pretty much sends your boat down out there, unless you have a ketch.

Guess I'm just nervous to write that big a check on something as old as my alternate choices. A 20 year old boat scares me maintenance wise - I know what it can be on a new boat
A 20 year old well cared for long distance cruiser is no more or less maintenance than a brand spanking new boat. I spent some time as a service tech for a Hunter dealer and would not touch one UNLESS I planned to do only day sails and weekends and then I would consider other models first. Our 30 year old cruiser can leave tomorrow on a circumnavigation with no more added than pots and pans, clothes and food. The maintenance on a circumnavigation on this boat will be no more or less than a brand new off the line Island Packet or any other vessel out there. You need to work on that particular fear factor in your choice OR make sure the check book is sufficiently stuffed. If you want to sail the Med in a Hunter either ship it there or buy one there then sell it there when you are done. If you want a quick and dirty on a Hunter, go to a dealer and take one for a test drive. Under power, let go of the wheel and watch the boat make an abrupt right turn. This will just be the beginning.
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Old 03-09-2008, 16:49   #10
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It has been my experience that after about 7 years, everything that moves or is mechanical on the boat is suspect. (the exhaust elbow, the waterlift muffler, all pumps, many hoses, tanks, lines, all electrical, stuffing box/bearing etc) it's the marine environment. If you buy new and do your homework you wont have to deal with this for 7 years, however, you will have to do a lot of outfitting. On a used boat, if you select right, someone will have thought through and outfitted many of the things for you. I would buy used, but would plan on nothing working very long without repair or replacement. Also, a boat that gets used often is better than one that sits and "hardly been driven".
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Old 03-09-2008, 17:20   #11
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Thank you, I will head over to the SSCA discussion and read more. It sounds like there is some apprehension in most of the post about "serious" bluewater voyaging, I guess my curiousity is in the "why".
For me it boils down to pounding time. Compared to "most" heavy displacement, heavy rig boats the production cruising rigs are too light.

For full time (years at sea) I would prefer a heavier rig that in my mind would stand up the to repeated pounding better.

For heavier rigs you give up speed.

As I said for the occassional delivery and island cruising where you pick your weather I have no problem.
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Old 03-09-2008, 17:37   #12
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Heavier rig and heavier boat require heavier rig and heavier sails and...... etc.
I'm not a hunter fan, but mostly because their designs look like they took pieces from different boats and just put them together! no visual flow... I'd take a well built medium light boat anywhere though.
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