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Old 14-10-2010, 06:54   #16
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Bob Perry also said (with tongue-in-cheek), that double-enders are good if you want to sail around the world backwards. He was pleasantly surprised they became as popular as they were.

His recent book, "Yacht Design According To Perry'" is a witty, honest, self-effacing history of his boat designs during his career.

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Old 14-10-2010, 08:26   #17
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I don't know why ... I realized I have no reason for this thought except abject ignorance ...
Realizing one’s ignorance is the first step towards enlightenment.
Good question.
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Old 14-10-2010, 08:32   #18
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For my cat the canoe stern produces virtually no wake. That must mean less drag surely. Above four knots we leave four lines of bubbles on the surface. We don't disturb moored boats, sleeping sea gulls or anything else much. Such a nice way to move in light winds. At peace with the world and the water.
Then some donut head in a motor dinghy (0.1 to 40 tonnes) jerks the world back into instability.
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Old 14-10-2010, 09:00   #19
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Another disadvantage is how the boats name is seen if painted on the stern.

Arctic Lady
Juneau Alaska

When viewed from one side it looks like Arctic Juneau.....from the other Lady Alaska.

Next time I paint I'm going to write it all out on each side.
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Old 14-10-2010, 09:05   #20
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Old 14-10-2010, 09:08   #21
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Another disadvantage is how the boats name is seen if painted on the stern.

Arctic Lady
Juneau Alaska

When viewed from one side it looks like Arctic Juneau.....from the other Lady Alaska.

Next time I paint I'm going to write it all out on each side.
Yes. We have ours duplicated for each side.

Another issue is when at a dock without a finger slip or at a Med mooring, then getting off the stern to the dock is a pain.
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Old 14-10-2010, 09:15   #22
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Yes. We have ours duplicated for each side.

Another issue is when at a dock without a finger slip or at a Med mooring, then getting off the stern to the dock is a pain.
Absolutely!
I've been working on a couple different designs of a boarding ramp that gets me past the dingy.
But to date have none.
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Old 14-10-2010, 09:53   #23
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Maybe it is an advantage if you decide to ride before the gale that the push from the impact of a roller is not as great as in a boat with huge flat transom?

Maybe it is easier to build a strong hull if the stern is round and pointed?

In any case, I can see some differences between the radical new transoms (wide and flat) and a double-ender (narrow and deep) but the older boats seem mostly the same - the waterline shape is the same in a double ender and in a 'normal' boat anyway.

I think I will be back to this thread later again.

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Old 14-10-2010, 11:22   #24
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I can't think how much we would have missed.
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Old 14-10-2010, 11:37   #25
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Canoe Stern

ADV
- running in a breaking sea
- smaller cockpit drains easily

DISADV
- poss rocking horse FX
- small cockpit - limited crew room
- aft storage limitation
- limited room for engine maintenance
- possibly not enough height to protect from sidewaves.
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Old 14-10-2010, 12:58   #26
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MarkJ,
I see you have the "seal of approval."
regards,
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Old 14-10-2010, 13:20   #27
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All sailboats are double enders at the water line Why?
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Old 14-10-2010, 13:40   #28
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I would add that my boat seems to track better than any boat I have ever had. I do agree with all the disadvantages too though. Esp. the lack of a good fishing platform.
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Old 14-10-2010, 13:51   #29
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All sailboats are double enders at the water line Why?
so the head will flush correctly
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Old 14-10-2010, 14:12   #30
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All sailboats are double enders at the water line Why?
Aside from SaltMonkey's answer (which is correct in its way):

- go to a boatyard find a doubleender (say a Valiant), go under the boat and look,
- repeat same with any adjacent hull (e.g. a Contessa 32, S&S 34, etc).

As you will find, their underbodies are the same. As long as they are the same, the boats will behave alike in the water.

Nearly all pre planning era boats are 'doubleenders' except not all of them have pointed stern.

I have sailed some doubleenders and many 'normal' boats and never noticed any difference in how they behave. The only boat that does sail differently is a planning hull. But that's another story altogether and part of this thread.

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