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Old 10-08-2009, 12:20   #31
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That is heavy! :>) Did you notice, the lines look a lot like a Bristol Channel cutter? you're definitely into a HD Pickup for towing, I've towed a Contessa 26 with w Diesel Ford F250. I would think maybe F350 for long tows. No moorage! Trail that thing to Puget Sound, Baha, or Florida.... Whatever the season requires!
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Old 10-08-2009, 12:27   #32
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Yeah, I would think a 3/4 ton HD would be perfect (just not my gas-guzzling Chevy with the 454 long block - it gets about 8mpg empty). The Seaward does resemble the BCC.

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Old 10-08-2009, 12:56   #33
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I'm gonna be redundant and second the suggestion for F-27 trimaran. Here lately the prices are quite reasonable and they have held their value exceptionally.

I spend a week at a time in the Keys on mine (which is modified and not a good example). I know there are a fair number of F-trimaran boaters (27 and up) going b/forth to the Bahamas etc.

Ian Farrier, the designer, is from NZ and I have always understood that Farrier designs his boats with Southern Ocean waters in mind.
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Old 12-08-2009, 14:43   #34
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I guess part of this comes down to what defines it as trailerable too.

I've seen houses moved down the road on trailers before (not mobile homes, houses). I wouldn't really call them trailerable. I've heard of 40+ boot full keel sailboats being trailered by semi trucks halfway across the continent too, but wouldn't call them trailable.

Thie seaward looks pretty cool, and the specs on the site list the weight at 8300 lbs dry, which is pretty heavy, but manageable with a 1 ton truck. But it also lists a 10'6" beam that I beleive is wider that what is generally allowed in most states.

Some of the other boats I've seen listed are trailerable as long as there's a lift or crane handy to pick the boat up and put it on the trailer.

And the other issue is how to get the mast down? Having a system that one or two people can pull the mast up or down in a hour or two with equipment that can be carried on the boat or trailer is probably always going to limit the durability of the boat as a whole, regardless of how strong the hull is.
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Old 12-08-2009, 16:29   #35
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Yea, it's really two different things: do you want a boat that is trailerable everytime you use it or are you looking for a boat that can be readily trailered a couple times a year.... I'm thinking if a person wants a 30 footer that they dont have to pay moorage on, insurance is cheap (ins co's kind of lump a trailerable in with the ski boats!), no bottom paint or blister issues etc... That Seaward looks like a heck of a boat. Reportedly they are built stout too... but I've not inspected one.
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Old 14-08-2009, 12:43   #36
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Anyone now anything about the Newbridge Navigator or Venture? I think they are Brit Twin Keel boats. Are they capable of bluewater?
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Old 21-08-2009, 11:53   #37
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I saw one other vote earlier for a Cape Dory 25...does anyone else have input on them (I looked through all the threads that specifically mentioned them)? My main use for it would be on the Chesapeake Bay.

My weight limit to tow is 6,500 lbs. When you factor in the weight of the trailor, that's going to exclude a lot of ~25' boats. I basically want something I can store on the trailer at a marina and can ramp launch. I'm also considering a Catalina 25.

Edit: One more question...is total weight calculated by adding displacement and ballast, or is the ballast figure included with displacement?
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Old 21-08-2009, 12:49   #38
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A Yankee Dolphin is a great trailerable boat with the ability to cross oceans. It's an S&S design originall built by built by O'day, later Yankee and some other builders. A true centerboard boat so has won't have the risky stability problems of the typical swing keel boat. Try Dolphin24.org - A Website For Dolphin Owners and Others Interested inthis Classic Design for more information.
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Old 21-08-2009, 13:04   #39
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Those Dolphins are sweet looking little boats...and the centerboard would be great for the Chesapeake...
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Old 21-08-2009, 13:17   #40
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Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
A Yankee Dolphin is a great trailerable boat with the ability to cross oceans. It's an S&S design originall built by built by O'day, later Yankee and some other builders. A true centerboard boat so has won't have the risky stability problems of the typical swing keel boat. Try Dolphin24.org - A Website For Dolphin Owners and Others Interested inthis Classic Design for more information.
Thanks. I'll check those out.
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Old 05-02-2010, 22:40   #41
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Can't help but to give my two cents worth in this thread. I've lived aboard my center cockpit Norsea27 for 16 years. In that time I have completed most of a global circumnavigation spanning 4 years, 3 months. Having nothing better to do with my time, I am back in Brisbane, Australia now - having sailed from Washington, State to San Francisco, points in between and eventually from Mexico via the milk run to Brisbane. Living aboard a Norsea27 can be a challenge if cruising - especially if there is more than one soul aboard. But, the never ending effort to get stuff off, and control what stuff comes aboard is not unique to small boats - as others have already alluded to in other posts. Her strengths have been adequately covered by others here. Negatives? Sure. She is a "wet butt" boat due to her low free board and tendency to occasionally take water over the rail. Uncomfortable with following seas alternatively lifting her quarters that create significant roll. But, how many boats are not uncomfortable going down wind? She is a champ on a broad reach and with the wind anywhere near a close reach. Fast? Nah. So, if you want to cover ground quickly, a boat with a longer water line would be a better choice. Storage space? If I used it all she would be another 4 inches down on her lines. Safe? A relative question for all boats, but the Norsea27 is built to take abuse. The boat is more likely to come through exceptionally bad conditions than I am... Another negative regards owning a trailer. Most owners probably trailer their Norsea27 infrequently, meaning that they must have some place to store the trailer when not in use. Potentially very expensive and troublesome. Try pulling your Norsea27 to San Diego then find either a place to park it for free or at an affordable cost. Good luck. Been there, done that. Corrosion to trailer brakes and other parts is unavoidable and again potentially expensive to repair. Been there and done that too. For single handing the Norsea27 is ideal. Attracting crew can be a challenge if you want someone to sail with you. Been there, done that. Managing close quarters with someone you know is quite different from doing so with a stranger. Frankly, I have a hard time understand how some couples - possibly married for years - manage the limited space. Can I recommend owning a Norsea27. You bet. As in owning any boat, serious consideration must be given to what you plan to do with the boat, your personal limitations, wants and needs.

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Old 06-02-2010, 20:57   #42
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As in owning any boat, serious consideration must be given to what you plan to do with the boat, your personal limitations, wants and needs.

Bob Lorenzi
Lots of wisdom in that post, me thinks...
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Old 17-02-2010, 10:41   #43
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One more choice - the Seafarer... "Mikula" is 24 c/b model, less than 2' draft with c/b in, about 4000# (the boat only). Very well built, sails well. I have a two-axis trailer with brakes, towing vehicle Isuzu Rodeo 3.2L. However this is not a boat to spend a few hours on the water then go home.... it takes a couple oh hours minimum to have the rig up etc. Can be done singlehanded - tu raise/lower mast etc....
I am wondering if you did make your choice by now.....
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Old 17-02-2010, 11:51   #44
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I'll second the PSC25. Not easily trailerable but certainly doable. I have a cradle on a flatbed which makes loading a bit of a hassle but launching is easy enough. It takes me about an hour to get her rigged from travel mode to in the water. I however keep her in a slip but I know of several people who trailer sail their PSCs. Their float on float off trailers cost more than my boat did though so like all things sailing it's a compramise. I also know of a bunch of people who have taken boats ranging from canoes to Mac26X to the Bahamas so if you have time to wait for a good weather window it is easily doable. Trying to fool mother nature will get mixed results, some uncomfortable, some deadly. Picking a weather window is much more important than the "right" small boat. Buy something learn to sail it well and have fun.........m
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Old 17-02-2010, 16:16   #45
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I too own a macgregor 26x,they are good trailor sailors,fully loaded mine weighs around the 1.5 ton mark.I have trailered my boat at distances of up to 350miles,they are easy to tow.

As for weather capability,i have had mine out in the North Sea in a force 7 going through "washing machine seas" that had a wave height of 8-10ft,it can take the rough weather okay,yet i would not have liked to have stayed out in that much longer.

If you are learning to sail as i have,the mac is a great learning boat,the keel and rudders kick up if you hit anything and the 50hp on the transom is usefull for getting in quick,they are also unsinkable and parts are cheap.

I would not cross the North Sea in one,i would however cross the channel at 22 miles ,the 150nm crossing is too great a distance for a mac to do it safely.

There is a group of sailors who take out boats as small as 19ft in what is known as the Jester Challenge,this year these guys will sail from plymouth to Rhode Island,if you check their website you can find a list of Ocean worthy small boats http://www.jesterinfo.org/
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