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Old 15-10-2018, 18:38   #76
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Propulsion?
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Old 15-10-2018, 18:39   #77
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

It is hard to beat an F27 for daysailing and pocket cruising, I owned one and sailed to the Bahamas. Loved it but it didn't rest at anchor, sailed through the wind. I have a PS Dana 24 all fun
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Old 15-10-2018, 22:13   #78
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Shaw 24, first boat designed to the MORC, prototype of S&S Dolphin 24

Apparently 10 made in Texas, a "pirate" version no royalties paid.

Thoughts?
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Old 18-01-2019, 12:42   #79
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Hi All Great thread with many great ideas and thoughts. Having owned and sailed Trailer yachts for over 40 years I thought I would contribute with my current solution and some of my thoughts.
I have owned many yachts and sailed on over 100 from Hartley 16ís ( one of the first trailable yachts ) to Sydney to Hobart Maxiís.
My own recent trailable mini cruisers have included Jarcat 6ís ( Plywood bridge deck trailable catamaran) and a TT680 Trailer Folding Trimaran.
As you can see I am not convention bound with tight prejudices around weight down low, the ability to withstand Atlantic games and point upwind at tiny angles.
My current and hopefully last big purchase has been of a maximum sized trailable yacht which I feel will be capable of being lived on for around half of each year whilst being moved around the country to explore, inshore islands, lakes and rivers and the odd short well planned coastal passage. An extended trip in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia is also on the retirement agenda.
I have purchased and commenced sailing and equipping an Imexus 28 which is a large trailable Power Sailer manufactured in Poland.
Swing keel, over six foot headroom at the galley, enclosed shower toilet compartment, 5/6 berths, intergrated mast raising system for one person and many other attributes.
It has a quality mast and sail control system designed for single handing along with a big inboard Diesel engine capable of planning speeds.
Whilst wishing to avoid the grief some have around Macgregors it was definitely inspired by that example whilst not really in the same league being bigger, stronger and more sailing focussed.
At around 3.2 ton ( just under 7000 lbs) on trailer fully laden with cruising equipment it is no daysailer but I can rig and launch it in under 45 minutes so itís not restricted to once or twice a year relocates.
I intend to use it as accommadation on land whilst trailering to distant cruising destinations as well.
I have recently towed a sister ship over 3000 miles from Perth to New South Wales here in Australia so can speak to its suitability to tow having done this.
I have recently fitted a tiller steering system which can take over from the small wheel steering with a quick control bar swap. I find sailing on small yachts with a tiller much more pleasurable and it has also given me a backup steering system as the power assisted wheel relies on the engine.
I hope my new yacht will become the ultimate grey nomad ( travelling retiree here in Australia) alternative to the caravan/motorhome/bus for around six months most years.
It might be an alternative for those seeking to do similar but whilst some earlier smaller Odin 820ís are around there are relatively few Imexus 28ís here in Australia ( 8-12 I think) and not that many in the States either.
Happy to answer questions or respond to thoughts.
Regards Graeme Kangaroo Valley Australia
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Old 18-01-2019, 18:13   #80
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

looks like a fun Trailer Sailor project. The ability to launch and recover by yourself is very appealing. I am refitting a Columbia 29 myself and while she is trailer-able (boat and trailer are a tad over 10,000 lbs) it's not something you want to drive across the country frequently.

I have been debating the use of a tabernacle mast and have plans for one that has already been engineered. Not sure I will though since I would rather spend my limited money on a water maker and custom cabinets.

Regardless, post up some more photos of your adventures across Australia for the rest of us.
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Old 18-01-2019, 20:47   #81
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Wow I really donít think I would like to trail that one more than once or twice a year.
Many think mine is a too big to regularly trail but sitting very low on the trailer and being right on the no permit required trailable width here in Aus at 2.5 meters wide its not that bad.
It was a bit intimidating at times being passed by huge double length road trains out crossing Australia as I stayed under 60mph and they often go closer to 70 mph.
An open stern and only a few ladder rings up from the ground when on trailer is a great advantage when trailing and even just getting back on board from swimming or the dingy.
One big advatange of an on water mast lowering ability is passing under bridges and powerlines to access rivers and some inland waterways.
Regards Graeme
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Old 18-01-2019, 23:41   #82
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Grith, welcome aboard CF, nice rig boat.
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Old 19-01-2019, 18:40   #83
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grith View Post
Wow I really donít think I would like to trail that one more than once or twice a year.
Many think mine is a too big to regularly trail but sitting very low on the trailer and being right on the no permit required trailable width here in Aus at 2.5 meters wide its not that bad.
It was a bit intimidating at times being passed by huge double length road trains out crossing Australia as I stayed under 60mph and they often go closer to 70 mph.
An open stern and only a few ladder rings up from the ground when on trailer is a great advantage when trailing and even just getting back on board from swimming or the dingy.
One big advatange of an on water mast lowering ability is passing under bridges and powerlines to access rivers and some inland waterways.
Regards Graeme

Looks like a great boat for some awesome adventures!
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Old 23-02-2019, 09:52   #84
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Great thread!

Last year I got bit by the sailing bug and purchased a 1989 Rhodes 22. General Boats has been making this same 22' model since the 1950's and is still in business. One of their programs has been to "recycle" the boat by buying used Rhodes 22's, updating, refitting, repainting and then reselling as a nearly new boat for considerably less than a brand new one. Mine was recycled in July of 2018.

I wanted to start small and learn. We started on a small lake and have worked up to bigger lakes and now getting ready for the Gulf of Mexico. We've spent a few nights on board and it's really not too bad. Kinda like a pop-up camper. It has a small v-berth which (like most boat owners it seems) gets used primarily for storage. There is an enclosed head with actual leg room, a very small galley on the starboard side with sink, stove, counter and storage space. Ours came with an ice box. The sitting area on the port side opens into a surprisingly comfortable full size bunk. Lot's of medium to small areas for stowage.

The cockpit is large with room to easily sit 6 adults. The traveler is mounted at the stern and keeps the cockpit clear of lines. The two winches for managing the genoa have storage boxes in the side of the hull for managing any excess line. The lazarette encompasses the entire stern, is lockable and can hold a lot of gear.

The 175 genoa is easily managed with the furler and the main is furled in mast. The boat was designed to be easy to sail (perfect for a newb, like myself), and can be single handed with some degree of confidence. Everything (except the anchor) can be managed from the cockpit.

Set up can also be accomplished by one person. General Boats includes a mast stepping system with a removable winch/gin pole on the bow. The rear stays and two side stays are attached to the boat, with the other side stays being attached at the gin pole. The winch is attached to the anchor cleat near the bow. Once the bottom of the mast is attached to the pivot point on the step, it's just a matter of cranking the winch handle to raise the mast. Once up the forstay/furler is attached and the rest of the stays. The traveler is attached between the rear stays with quick pins. From parking lot to launch to dock usually takes me about an hour.

Power is managed with a 8hp Yamaha outboard

So far it's been a great boat. It's a pocket cruiser and inspires confidence. We're gearing up for trip to the keys in April and plan to sail to the Dry Tortugas. I'm looking forward to sailing out of sight of land for the first time.
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Old 23-02-2019, 10:24   #85
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

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Originally Posted by trailguy View Post
Great thread!

Last year I got bit by the sailing bug and purchased a 1989 Rhodes 22. General Boats has been making this same 22' model since the 1950's and is still in business. One of their programs has been to "recycle" the boat by buying used Rhodes 22's, updating, refitting, repainting and then reselling as a nearly new boat for considerably less than a brand new one. Mine was recycled in July of 2018.

I wanted to start small and learn. We started on a small lake and have worked up to bigger lakes and now getting ready for the Gulf of Mexico. We've spent a few nights on board and it's really not too bad. Kinda like a pop-up camper. It has a small v-berth which (like most boat owners it seems) gets used primarily for storage. There is an enclosed head with actual leg room, a very small galley on the starboard side with sink, stove, counter and storage space. Ours came with an ice box. The sitting area on the port side opens into a surprisingly comfortable full size bunk. Lot's of medium to small areas for stowage.

The cockpit is large with room to easily sit 6 adults. The traveler is mounted at the stern and keeps the cockpit clear of lines. The two winches for managing the genoa have storage boxes in the side of the hull for managing any excess line. The lazarette encompasses the entire stern, is lockable and can hold a lot of gear.

The 175 genoa is easily managed with the furler and the main is furled in mast. The boat was designed to be easy to sail (perfect for a newb, like myself), and can be single handed with some degree of confidence. Everything (except the anchor) can be managed from the cockpit.

Set up can also be accomplished by one person. General Boats includes a mast stepping system with a removable winch/gin pole on the bow. The rear stays and two side stays are attached to the boat, with the other side stays being attached at the gin pole. The winch is attached to the anchor cleat near the bow. Once the bottom of the mast is attached to the pivot point on the step, it's just a matter of cranking the winch handle to raise the mast. Once up the forstay/furler is attached and the rest of the stays. The traveler is attached between the rear stays with quick pins. From parking lot to launch to dock usually takes me about an hour.

Power is managed with a 8hp Yamaha outboard

So far it's been a great boat. It's a pocket cruiser and inspires confidence. We're gearing up for trip to the keys in April and plan to sail to the Dry Tortugas. I'm looking forward to sailing out of sight of land for the first time.
Looks and sounds like a great boat! Have fun in the Tortugas.. we love it there.
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Old 23-02-2019, 12:19   #86
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

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Last year I got bit by the sailing bug and purchased a 1989 Rhodes 22
That pop top intrigues me, as does the centreboard. What are the tank capacities?

Have they crossed oceans much?
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Old 23-02-2019, 14:44   #87
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

Hi Trailguy Great to see some others enthusiastic about using their Trailable yachts for extended cruising. Hoping it brings you lots of fun. Graeme
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Old 25-02-2019, 06:43   #88
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Re: Trailer Sailor & Pocket Cruiser Boats, Tips, Advice, Examples

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That pop top intrigues me, as does the centreboard. What are the tank capacities?

Have they crossed oceans much?
The pop top connects to the mast so it can stay up while under way. It extends the headroom to just over 6' in the cabin. General Boats makes an enclosure for it to keep out wind and bugs. The centerboard (called a diamond board by GB) can be raised or lowered from the cockpit and is designed so if you run aground it will retract into the hull. One of the things I like is the boat has a shallow draft keel and will still point decently with the center board up, yet only draws 18-24" (depending on how your loaded).

I'm doubtful about ocean crossing, but there are several accounts of other Rhodes 22 owners sailing them to the Bahamas.
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