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Old 04-12-2012, 13:16   #1
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Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

We are evaluating several vessel types for our Floating Health Care Clinic (mono, Cat, and Tri) and although we are leaning toward the Cat, the more affordability of the monohull will allow us to keep more $$ into medical supplies and volunteers.

I really need your feedback on a type of Monohull that we are seeing in different locations. The Bodrum Yard Gulet vessels (link to one example). They provide the deck space we need for patient evaluation and treatment, the room we need for volunteer housing, and the storage we need for medical supplies. My question or concern is "How are they for water sailing">Blue water sailing?". With key health care volunteers, we want to make sure they are safe with the short island to island runs, but also in the open ocean when we head back to OZ or NZ. From the looks of the majority of their locations, it will require us to sail them from the Mediteranean to the South Pacific (a lot of open ocean).

Does anyone have any first hand knowledge of how well these vessels operate?

Thanks!

Richard Hackett
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Old 04-12-2012, 13:34   #2
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Hi Richard,

Some parts of this post may sound negative but they are well ment and honestly put.

I don't think the Gulet style boat will work outside the close in shores of the Mediteraniean where there is always a port to fly into.

No, I'm not some traditionalist, I have a Beneteau 393 and some don't think mine can cross an ocean, I don't think an Gulet can.

They are made of soft pine wood at a price affordable to people with a lot less ability to pay than us.

They look great on the water. But they are day tripping tourist boats. They last for a few years and then get ummmmm well they get rid of them to anyone unsuspecting.

Finally, unless you have had extensive time in that particular country and have extensive business contacts in the marine industry and have people who not only tell you that you can trust them, but have done dollars and cents deals with them, then I don't think you will ever buy anything on a win/win deal in that country.

And it's you that will be the loser.

I am sorry to sound negative, but if you have that ball park figure to buy a ocean going boat for clients then I would recommend a catamaran made of fiberglass from a French or well know builder.

Some people would end up a post saying: well if I am wrong at least I warned you.
I won't. I'll end up saying please head the warning because a purchase will be a mistake.


Mark
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Old 04-12-2012, 13:38   #3
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

LOL, I love your honesty. Thanks for taking the time to share it. I had never really heard of, or been around these vessels, so any advice will be heeded.

Advice taken.
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Old 04-12-2012, 13:52   #4
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Mark's comments on Gulet's may be overly harsh. There are Gulets that are built of mahogany over proper hardwood frames, there are even 'sailing gulets' that are designed to actually sail. But unless you have access to very cheap labour trained in traditional wood boat maintenance, the annual haul-out required by these vessels will break the bank.

Gulets are fine motor vessels for cruising in the Mediterranean, but they are not ocean crossing vessels.
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Old 04-12-2012, 13:56   #5
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Hi Richard,

Some parts of this post may sound negative but they are well ment and honestly put.

I don't think the Gulet style boat will work outside the close in shores of the Mediteraniean where there is always a port to fly into.

No, I'm not some traditionalist, I have a Beneteau 393 and some don't think mine can cross an ocean, I don't think an Gulet can.

They are made of soft pine wood at a price affordable to people with a lot less ability to pay than us.

They look great on the water. But they are day tripping tourist boats. They last for a few years and then get ummmmm well they get rid of them to anyone unsuspecting.

Finally, unless you have had extensive time in that particular country and have extensive business contacts in the marine industry and have people who not only tell you that you can trust them, but have done dollars and cents deals with them, then I don't think you will ever buy anything on a win/win deal in that country.

And it's you that will be the loser.

I am sorry to sound negative, but if you have that ball park figure to buy a ocean going boat for clients then I would recommend a catamaran made of fiberglass from a French or well know builder.

Some people would end up a post saying: well if I am wrong at least I warned you.
I won't. I'll end up saying please head the warning because a purchase will be a mistake.


Mark
+1

I love Turkey, but I am afraid that Mark speaks the truth.

As salty as they look, Bodrum gulets are not really made for sailing, and I would be afraid to be caught in any weather in one. The are really motor vessels with decorative sails.
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Old 04-12-2012, 14:02   #6
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

But on the cat side of things (and I am not a cat person!) is this sort of think only 6 years old EU VAT paid, sleeps 8 plus crew, so 4 client couples, and look at the deckspace! you can do yoga group for 10 with space to spare. for $520,000
2006 Lagoon 500 Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
It's a sail boat, not power boat like the URL says.

But that's just a quick look at Yachworld
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Old 04-12-2012, 14:33   #7
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

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Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
But on the cat side of things (and I am not a cat person!) is this sort of think only 6 years old EU VAT paid, sleeps 8 plus crew, so 4 client couples, and look at the deckspace! you can do yoga group for 10 with space to spare. for $520,000
It's a sail boat, not power boat like the URL says.

But that's just a quick look at Yachworld
I love the Lagoon, and that is a great price for a Lagoon 500). It is right on the minimum limits with regrds to volunteer housing and storage, but worth looking into. Yoga for 10? Sounds like a sea tale to me.

Thanks!
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Old 04-12-2012, 14:37   #8
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Hi Richard,
I am not sure what your experience is on delivering medical aid from a private boat.
I am a sailing surgeon on a 45 Cat and have done similar projects in Vanuatu and PNG from my boat. From my experience it easier to keep a lot of the work shore based. Usually the local chief will have a community hut available for consultations and examination. It makes the whole logistics easier - no ferrying of sick people back and forth with the dinghy. If that is not available just rig up a tarps for shade and privacy. Often you can take the people that you cant deal with there and then to a local health clinic or hospital with your boat and rely on local expertise often quite good or supply the know how via your volunteers and use the facilities - that opens up the whole field of local registration and right to practice discussion but let's not go there. So I do not feel you need a lot of deck space. I am a Cat person and my boat is ideal for what I do but if you are on a limited budget and want to carry lots of supplies a monohull might be better for you. An easier option would be to by the boat in the States and just sail it over or in OZ - but the prices are a bit higher here. Please also keep in mind and I am sure you do that the upkeep of a boat is an expensive budget item and something you have to factor into your calculations. Usually the older and more exotic the boat is the more so - you really get what you pay for. My opinion about volunteers: they should pay for their own way to get there - if not you might encourage a sponsored aid tourism program that significantly depletes the funds that should go to the people you want to look after.
I wish you all the best for your venture
Nils
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Old 04-12-2012, 14:40   #9
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Sorry, I reread your first post... If they are only volunteers you can stick 8 in every cabin. Just have a buzzer for when they roll over.
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Old 04-12-2012, 14:52   #10
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nils View Post
Hi Richard,
I am not sure what your experience is on delivering medical aid from a private boat.
I am a sailing surgeon on a 45 Cat and have done similar projects in Vanuatu and PNG from my boat. From my experience it easier to keep a lot of the work shore based. Usually the local chief will have a community hut available for consultations and examination. It makes the whole logistics easier - no ferrying of sick people back and forth with the dinghy. If that is not available just rig up a tarps for shade and privacy. Often you can take the people that you cant deal with there and then to a local health clinic or hospital with your boat and rely on local expertise often quite good or supply the know how via your volunteers and use the facilities - that opens up the whole field of local registration and right to practice discussion but let's not go there. So I do not feel you need a lot of deck space. I am a Cat person and my boat is ideal for what I do but if you are on a limited budget and want to carry lots of supplies a monohull might be better for you. An easier option would be to by the boat in the States and just sail it over or in OZ - but the prices are a bit higher here. Please also keep in mind and I am sure you do that the upkeep of a boat is an expensive budget item and something you have to factor into your calculations. Usually the older and more exotic the boat is the more so - you really get what you pay for. My opinion about volunteers: they should pay for their own way to get there - if not you might encourage a sponsored aid tourism program that significantly depletes the funds that should go to the people you want to look after.
I wish you all the best for your venture
Nils
great input,nice to hear from people that have actually done it
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Old 04-12-2012, 14:54   #11
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nils View Post
Hi Richard,
I am not sure what your experience is on delivering medical aid from a private boat.
I am a sailing surgeon on a 45 Cat and have done similar projects in Vanuatu and PNG from my boat. From my experience it easier to keep a lot of the work shore based. Usually the local chief will have a community hut available for consultations and examination. It makes the whole logistics easier - no ferrying of sick people back and forth with the dinghy. If that is not available just rig up a tarps for shade and privacy. Often you can take the people that you cant deal with there and then to a local health clinic or hospital with your boat and rely on local expertise often quite good or supply the know how via your volunteers and use the facilities - that opens up the whole field of local registration and right to practice discussion but let's not go there. So I do not feel you need a lot of deck space. I am a Cat person and my boat is ideal for what I do but if you are on a limited budget and want to carry lots of supplies a monohull might be better for you. An easier option would be to by the boat in the States and just sail it over or in OZ - but the prices are a bit higher here. Please also keep in mind and I am sure you do that the upkeep of a boat is an expensive budget item and something you have to factor into your calculations. Usually the older and more exotic the boat is the more so - you really get what you pay for. My opinion about volunteers: they should pay for their own way to get there - if not you might encourage a sponsored aid tourism program that significantly depletes the funds that should go to the people you want to look after.
I wish you all the best for your venture
Nils
First off, Kudos to you for giving of your time and energy to meet the needs of the South Pacific. I'd love to pick your brain in greater detail if possible. Willing to sail to Tonga and work with us a year or two?

With regards to your advice, I agree, at 50' and under, the best deliver method for service is onshore. Our goal was to avoid the perpectual setup and teardown process with each stop (except for the "cannot be moved" care) and the concern of power, transporting medicines, clean room, etc. that can be provided directly on the vessel. With regards to the volunteers, that is exactly how we have it setup (except for those willing to volunteer for longer periods... refund on their way back at the end of the tour).

Great advice, hope to hear from you again.
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Old 04-12-2012, 15:15   #12
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Hi Richard,
I have googled SeaMercy and I am glad to see you are serious.
I am happy to help with advice as much as possible.
I am Australian Navy Reserve and must say it is a great luxury and a fantastic way to operate (pun intended) especially for procedural work and have all your facilities and the logistics with you on board but it relies on a huge infrastructure and the costs......
if you feel I can be of help please feel free to send me an email
my email is nils@westnet.com.au
cheers
Nils
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Old 04-12-2012, 15:51   #13
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Look at the underbody of these. IMHO they will roll at anchor making life difficult and most any work impossible.

Looks wood and built in Turkey? Steer clear.

Bloody expensive too.

b.
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Old 04-12-2012, 20:04   #14
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

If you are planning a floating clinic in the So. Pacific, perhaps it would make sense to search out boats that are used in that area, and which have been there a while. They will obviously be able to handle the weather (since they've been there a while) and they will already be there, so there is less expense in getting them where they'd be needed. You might be able to find a cheap canal barge in Europe, but it wouldn't be easy to get to Oz, or suitable for the sailing conditions once it got there.
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Old 08-12-2012, 11:18   #15
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Re: Thoughts on the "Gulet" for Blue Water sailing?

Hello Richard,

I am contacting you via the Sea Mercy Captain Form. Nothing firm yet but it looks interesting...
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