Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 28-11-2012, 04:05   #91
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 48
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

now the trick is to keep it, we lost a 11ft waler rib and 9.9 first night in san juan. now we got a 10ft chain with 20$ square padlock we use when dingy not on davits or deck. we was actually still tied up in front of the pink customs shack when it was stolen during the first night, that place even had 24/7 security guards. chain to davits to prevent hull damage with painter line off dingy bow. lock chain first when coming alongside and make a habit of locking your dingy as we lost 3 before getting dilegent about lock first then unload/depart to deck/shore.first insurance claim resulted in no premium increase but never made subsequent claims outside USCG patrolled areas due to premium increases. cheers
__________________

__________________
bottomend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2012, 04:33   #92
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,750
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

There is no good solution to the problem of what kind of dink to have and how to store it onboard, especially on a boat that size. Every approach has severe disadvantages of one kind or another. For example:

1. Davits. Pro: convenient. Con: ugly, windage, extra LOA, expensive, ugly, ugly, ugly.

2. Storage on deck. Pro: Less windage, cheapest. Con: Blocks vision, in the way and trip over, interferes with rigging, very hard to get the dink up on deck.

3. Deflate and roll up. Pro: Least (zero) windage, cheap. Con: Very laborious to inflate, deflate, get the dink on and off deck, occupies space below.

4. Dinghy garage. Pro: Zero windage, extremely convenient, dink protected from elements. Con: Occupies a vast amount of hull volume.


I don't even mention towing, which I would never do.

Dinghy is a real problem. Having a bigger, faster RIB is a tremendous plus -- opens up all kinds of possibilties to explore, and you have effortless transport even to more remote anchorages. But where the hell to store it? One of the main advantages of bigger boats is that this problem becomes gradually easier to solve with less negative effects, with more size of the mother ship. Up to the point that on superish- yachts, you can have a really good RIB in its own well in the foredeck, and its own lifting gear, or a tender garage that doesn't eliminate your lazarette.

On my last boat, a 37 footer, we used manual davits to lift a hard floor inflatable (non-RIB). Motor was stored separately on the rail. It was enough of a PITA to get it in the water and ready to go that we often skipped going on shore altogether, which I regret now.

Present boat, we have a 3.4 meter RIB with remote steering (a huge plus) and 25hp. We store it in beefy electric davits, motor and all. This is much more convenient, so we "get out more" at anchor, so to speak. But it is extremely ugly, and adds 2 meters to LOA bringing us over 60 feet. I've carried the dink in the davits in all kinds of horrible weather, and it seems very stable, although I would hesitate to cross an ocean with the dink in any kind of davits, and I can't imagine what else we would do with that dink.

It's a real PITA -- carrying dinks on board, however you slice it.
__________________

__________________
Dockhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2012, 09:40   #93
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,363
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
There is no good solution to the problem of what kind of dink to have and how to store it onboard, especially on a boat that size. Every approach has severe disadvantages of one kind or another. For example:

1. Davits. Pro: convenient. Con: ugly, windage, extra LOA, expensive, ugly, ugly, ugly.

2. Storage on deck. Pro: Less windage, cheapest. Con: Blocks vision, in the way and trip over, interferes with rigging, very hard to get the dink up on deck.

3. Deflate and roll up. Pro: Least (zero) windage, cheap. Con: Very laborious to inflate, deflate, get the dink on and off deck, occupies space below.

4. Dinghy garage. Pro: Zero windage, extremely convenient, dink protected from elements. Con: Occupies a vast amount of hull volume.


I don't even mention towing, which I would never do.

Dinghy is a real problem. Having a bigger, faster RIB is a tremendous plus -- opens up all kinds of possibilties to explore, and you have effortless transport even to more remote anchorages. But where the hell to store it? One of the main advantages of bigger boats is that this problem becomes gradually easier to solve with less negative effects, with more size of the mother ship. Up to the point that on superish- yachts, you can have a really good RIB in its own well in the foredeck, and its own lifting gear, or a tender garage that doesn't eliminate your lazarette.

On my last boat, a 37 footer, we used manual davits to lift a hard floor inflatable (non-RIB). Motor was stored separately on the rail. It was enough of a PITA to get it in the water and ready to go that we often skipped going on shore altogether, which I regret now.

Present boat, we have a 3.4 meter RIB with remote steering (a huge plus) and 25hp. We store it in beefy electric davits, motor and all. This is much more convenient, so we "get out more" at anchor, so to speak. But it is extremely ugly, and adds 2 meters to LOA bringing us over 60 feet. I've carried the dink in the davits in all kinds of horrible weather, and it seems very stable, although I would hesitate to cross an ocean with the dink in any kind of davits, and I can't imagine what else we would do with that dink.

It's a real PITA -- carrying dinks on board, however you slice it.
Good post, but I just dont get the ugly part. Alot of things could be called ugly on a cruising boat. Bimini? Ugly, Solar Panels? Ugly, Lifelines? Ugly, Windvane? Ugly, Radar antenna? Ugly, Windmill? Ugly. Davits solve the theft, time, effort and mess issues readily. Dont leave home without them!
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2012, 16:25   #94
Senior Cruiser
 
s/v Beth's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Boat: Valiant 40 (1975)
Posts: 4,066
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

Nash, I used to have a whaler (the old 13 foot one) Great craft, probably too heavy for a tender on a 40 foot sailboat. If you decide to passagemake, you are going to have to put it on the deck somewhere. Just a thought.
__________________
s/v Beth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2012, 16:52   #95
Registered User
 
Nicholson58's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Live aboard
Boat: Camper & Nicholson58 Ketch - ROXY Traverse City, Michigan No.668283
Posts: 3,466
Images: 83
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post

One of the main advantages of bigger boats is that this problem becomes gradually easier to solve with less negative effects, with more size of the mother ship. Up to the point that on superish- yachts, you can have a really good RIB in its own well in the foredeck, and its own lifting gear, or a tender garage that doesn't eliminate your lazarette.

It's a real PITA -- carrying dinks on board, however you slice it.
We are 58 feet with a Carribe 9.5 foot & 15 OB. The Camper-Nicholson is old school with narrow nipped in stern and a mizzen; center cockpit. In this case, big boat doesn't help much. The RIB is still a pain. We usually transport with the RIB inverted below the mizzen boom. It covers the master hatch and lazerette hatch. Foredeck has two intermediate stays so its not possible to place the thing on deck.
__________________
Nicholson58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-10-2013, 11:43   #96
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 6
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

I have a 3m inflatable with a 5hp Suzuki 4-stroke. In a chop its very wet, it doesn't plane with more than one on board, it doesn't row well, it doesn't sail at all, its susceptible to damage in rocks etc. and its not that much lighter than a quality hard dinghy. USABLE internal space for a 3m is limited as the tubes take up a lot if room and extend past the transom. Its only real PRO is that I can deflate it and stow it away on a long voyage (very seldom!).

Now, I don't have one, but I have been looking at a 9ft NESTAWAY nesting dinghy made in the UK. Rows very well, sails very well, tows very well, and (most importantly) it breaks into two halves that "nest" into each other for stowage on the foredeck. Getting onto the deck would be easy with a halyard. Only needs a small outboard, around 4hp I think.

One factor not mentioned here, but VERY important in the Med or any area where you are moored stern-to and have other boats alongside, is that a RIB or inflatable can be sandwiched between hulls without damage. A hard dinghy would be a disaster.

Davits are an impossible obstacle on a stern-to morning, unless on a catamaran. So for the Med, it really has to be stowage on deck, or towed, or a combination depending on conditions.

FYI My boat is a 45ft Shearwater (Dudley Dix design), and it's based in the Med.
__________________
Schapera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-10-2013, 12:12   #97
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Durban South Africa
Boat: L 34
Posts: 280
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

This is an advanced thread with pages of comments that I'm not going to wade through. I'm just going to have a good rant.! Inflateables are absolute Cr*P. The guys who make them should be made to eat them! Non-Biodegradeable, un-repairable, Landfill fillers. On any boat bigger than around 28ft, there is always a way to stow a hard dink on deck, the size of which will grow along with the size of the boat and the number of people that can be accomodated on board. The fixation with big outboards and the ability to plane should also be questioned. You've taken the whole day/week/months to get to the anchorage, and now it's imperative that you get to shore, and that cold beer, in 10secs flat?!! C'mon. 2, or if you're wealthy, 4 hp is perfectly adequate. Fibreglass is infinitely repairable, - get a dinghy that you'll never have to replace and put these inflateable garbage merchants out of business.
__________________
holmek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-10-2013, 15:05   #98
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Wherever the wind takes me
Boat: Bristol 41.1
Posts: 809
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

When the dinghy commute is 2-3 miles, the ability to safely plane the dinghy does matter. Makes the difference in getting back to your boat in minutes rather than an hour. When time matters, this can make a difference.

I think that if I were to do it again, I'd go with a RIB - 10 ft. or so, with a 10hp. Too many beaches that are rocky, piers that are covered with razor clams, etc.
__________________
redsky49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-10-2013, 17:18   #99
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Mackay,QLD, Australia
Boat: planning a approx 45ft cat
Posts: 3,651
Images: 3
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by holmek View Post
This is an advanced thread with pages of comments that I'm not going to wade through. I'm just going to have a good rant.! Inflateables are absolute Cr*P. The guys who make them should be made to eat them! Non-Biodegradeable, un-repairable, Landfill fillers. On any boat bigger than around 28ft, there is always a way to stow a hard dink on deck, the size of which will grow along with the size of the boat and the number of people that can be accomodated on board. The fixation with big outboards and the ability to plane should also be questioned. You've taken the whole day/week/months to get to the anchorage, and now it's imperative that you get to shore, and that cold beer, in 10secs flat?!! C'mon. 2, or if you're wealthy, 4 hp is perfectly adequate. Fibreglass is infinitely repairable, - get a dinghy that you'll never have to replace and put these inflateable garbage merchants out of business.
Sounds like you have only be exposed to CRAP inflatables.

There are long lasting, durable RIB inflatables available. Plenty of long term cruisers here would disagree with you.
__________________
downunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-10-2013, 17:21   #100
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
Re: Tender for 40' Yacht ?

i now have 10 ft walker bay instead of my old 8 ft one. it is a much more stable row boat and provisioning platform. also easier to carry bike. and crew.. go figger...lol
__________________

zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tender, yacht

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Royal Suva Yacht Club - Fiji Atraxia Pacific & South China Sea 1 15-10-2011 02:30
Polaris Yacht Deliveries is launched! ionianpilot Commercial Posts 0 24-08-2011 14:21
Wealth ! . . . How Yacht Owners Are Perceived Pelagic Off Topic Forum 93 21-08-2011 23:41
After Changing a US-Flagged Yacht, How Long Can it Stay in USA ? Mexdon Liveaboard's Forum 8 09-08-2011 00:03
Free: Cargo Shifting . . . Yacht Design Anachronisms SvenG Classifieds Archive 0 23-05-2011 20:46



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 23:30.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.