Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 10-12-2010, 08:57   #16
Registered User
 
simonmd's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Sant Carles, S Spain
Boat: 30ft Catalac 900 "Rubessa"
Posts: 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantomracer View Post
The previous owner of our Ohlson 38 redid the teak deck.. after starting a recaulking project...the entire deck was in the dumpster!





Of course..the final product was well worth the effort! (1992 picture)




Only maintenance is washdown with salt water, and occasional brightening. Looks decent 18 years later (2010 picture below)




I would go for a teak deck.. Naturally skid resistant, pretty, long lasting, low maintenance. Not cheap if it needs to be replaced though. The deck on our boat was made by Teak Decking System, in 2 pre-made pieces and glued down. No bungs to worry about popping or leaking.
Now that is B, E, A, UTIFULL!

I have teak on my motoryacht and LOVE it. It's very practical and safe as the combination of the teak and calking provide a very non slip surface, even when wet. However, as has been mentioned, in the summer WOW does it get hot! You certainly cannot walk on it in bare feet thats for sure.

If the boat you're looking at has teak in good condition then great, day to day maintainace is almost nil and teak actualy loves saltwater. If it needs work then prepare for a BIG bill. Easiest way to assess the condition is look at the level of the teak compared to the level of the calking (the black sealer inbetween the planks). If the calking is noticably higher in places then the teak is really past it's best.
__________________

__________________
Previous owner of a 1994 Catalac 900, now sadly SOLD
simonmd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 09:03   #17
Registered User
 
Auspicious's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: HR 40
Posts: 1,793
Send a message via Skype™ to Auspicious
I spend less time caring for my teak deck than I used to spend mowing the lawn. Not bad at all.
__________________

__________________
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks
Beware cut and paste sailors
Auspicious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 09:25   #18
S&S
Registered User
 
S&S's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2009
Boat: 48' 1963 S&S yawl
Posts: 851
Images: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by cburger View Post
If you read my post carefully it said"Properly installed and cared for it can last indefinately" Improperly installed and abused they can turn into a real mess.

The teak decks on my personal boat are over thirty five years old, over an inch thick and absoltly no deck core problems. After a "High quality" reseaming that was performed two ars ago I expect the deck will be going strong long after I have passed on to the "Happy hunting grounds". The origional installer wasa skilled shipwright adlaid the decks right.

P.S. Phantomracer what a pretty boat.
Lucky you. Point beng, teak does wear out. It just doesn't make a lot of sense to me putting it on a glass hull. YMMV
__________________
S&S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 09:40   #19
Registered User
 
swagman's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Winter land based UK New Forest. Summer months away. Making the transition from sail to power this year - scary stuff.
Boat: Super Van Craft 1320 Power Yacht
Posts: 2,175
Images: 10
Send a message via Skype™ to swagman
Love teak. Had it on current and past two yachts. Both earlier were teak onto GRP. Looked great and I think caring for them was good therapy. Like cleaning a pool and well worth the effort.

Current (new) boat is 45 year old steel with teak overlaid. Sure it took two weeks when we got her to track back where caulking was failing and fixing that - plus replacing perhaps 40 screws / plugs - but it felt soooo good to get that job done and look at the end result.

How quick does it really wear out? This teak deck is now down to 3/4 inch thick - lost maybe 1/8th in 45 years. But was kept in northern europe.

Even so, I fully expect the boat AND deck to last my lifetime.
That will do me.

Cheers
JOHN
__________________
Don't take life too seriously. No ones going to make it out alive......Go see our blog at http://www.sailblogs.com/member/yachtswagman/
swagman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 10:26   #20
Registered User
 
phantomracer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: 1968 Ohlson 38 Sloop
Posts: 773
Images: 9
Send a message via Yahoo to phantomracer
Quote:
Originally Posted by cburger View Post
He thought the deck was solid until he pulled out the caulking..and all the boards came out with it!

"Guessing" from the pictures a true teak deck not an overlayment?[/QUOTE]

The original deck was a traditional teak deck.

The new deck is Marine Plywood, West Epoxy, dynel, epoxy, and a deck made in 2 pieces by Teak Decking Systems in FL, trucked up in a containter to MA, glued/vacuum sealed down. Seems to have held up great for 18 years, IMO.
__________________
phantomracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 10:33   #21
Registered User
 
phantomracer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: 1968 Ohlson 38 Sloop
Posts: 773
Images: 9
Send a message via Yahoo to phantomracer
Quote:
Originally Posted by swagman View Post
How quick does it really wear out? This teak deck is now down to 3/4 inch thick - lost maybe 1/8th in 45 years
Cheers
JOHN
I hear this all the time. 'teak wears out'. Always wanted to know how fast. Mine is 18 years old, from the pictures, looks as good as the day it was installed. I can't even see 1/64 of an inch gone.

I don't know when my deck will wear out to the point it needs replacing due strictly to normal wear.. I suspect it wont be in my lifetime.

No doubt decks that have a lot of neglect and lack of maintenance will degrade faster. Keep after it, I think it should last the life of the boat.
__________________
phantomracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 11:06   #22
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
I have teak decks. I work on them all the time, and all in all they've been pretty good to me. It took me a few years to really "get it" when it comes to how to maintain them, what's a real problem, what's just cosmetic, etc.

Bad signs (if you see any of these, walk away):

- boards are thin (like less than 1/4" anywhere. 1/2" or bigger is best).
- screw heads are under the deck, screw points are pointed up (I've seen it).
- rotten boards. crap lumber. sadly, "new teak" is nowhere near as great as the old growth stuff that is now completely gone from the planet's surface.


If you're planning on living aboard and cruising, forget about putting the boat in the garage and spending two weeks straight working on the decks and doing a "perfect" job. The boats with the most amazing decks never get underway and sit under covers like some museum piece. Especially beating to windward you will cause the decks to shimmy loose from their polysulfide. It's not the end of the world: just reef/pay the seams again and you're good to go. You'll do in in sections rather than some big "all the boat at once project".

Don't *ever* use a sander, get a Fein multimaster, put salt water on your decks all the time to wash them, scrub them with a scotch pad (no bristles).

After rain or dew, look for places were the wood is still wet at the seams (compared to other dry places). Those seams are starting to give, and you need to rebed them. Again, if you spend a few hours every few weeks reefing/paying seams, you'll keep the deck pretty water tight, you'll avoid mega-projects, and it will stay pretty manageable.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 11:06   #23
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantomracer View Post
I hear this all the time. 'teak wears out'. Always wanted to know how fast. Mine is 18 years old, from the pictures, looks as good as the day it was installed. I can't even see 1/64 of an inch gone.

I don't know when my deck will wear out to the point it needs replacing due strictly to normal wear.. I suspect it wont be in my lifetime.

No doubt decks that have a lot of neglect and lack of maintenance will degrade faster. Keep after it, I think it should last the life of the boat.
My $0.02: it "wears out" from lazy/dumb owners who put sanders to them.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 11:53   #24
Registered User
 
Bluefuss's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: B.C. Canada / San Carlos, Sonora
Boat: Tayana 37
Posts: 168
Thank you all for your input.As I said the boat has basically been rebuilt and other than the deck worry she makes me smile everytime I think of her. If I make an offer that leads to a survey I suppose I will have to trust my surveyor to educate me as to the real state of the core and the teak. I too enjoy maintainance, but dont want to spend all my time on projects. I believe the boat has spent a lot of time in the pacific northwest, but in a season or two i will sail south. (So Columbia is a good option for repair or replacement). For the first few years I will leave her on the hard for aprox 6 months a year, and sail the other months, will the teak need constant dampening while I'm away?
__________________
When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.
Mark Twain
Bluefuss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 11:54   #25
Registered User
 
Bluefuss's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: B.C. Canada / San Carlos, Sonora
Boat: Tayana 37
Posts: 168
And yes searching the archives can be a bit of a shot in the dark
__________________
When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.
Mark Twain
Bluefuss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 12:11   #26
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,767
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
i wish my formosa had teak decks--they are easy care and very nonskid, best nonskid in world. easy care-- throw salt water and swab, mate-- gently at the swabbing--ye dont want to remove the teak. no sanding-- many do that--is horrid thing to do to the decks-- "wears em out" as it were--- is unnecessary. cover them in tropix and use sea water EVERY DAY and often more than once per day--keeps heat down and makes them last looong time. teak is awesome.
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 12:16   #27
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefuss View Post
Thank you all for your input.As I said the boat has basically been rebuilt and other than the deck worry she makes me smile everytime I think of her. If I make an offer that leads to a survey I suppose I will have to trust my surveyor to educate me as to the real state of the core and the teak. I too enjoy maintainance, but dont want to spend all my time on projects. I believe the boat has spent a lot of time in the pacific northwest, but in a season or two i will sail south. (So Columbia is a good option for repair or replacement). For the first few years I will leave her on the hard for aprox 6 months a year, and sail the other months, will the teak need constant dampening while I'm away?
It would be best, but it's not the end of the world if you don't do it. Dump some sea water on it before you leave, and try to do the same after it rains (which rinses the salt away). Again, not the end of the world, but the more often you do it the better. You might want to consider getting a full boat canvas cover made that goes lifeline-to-lifeline, in which case not a lot of rain will get on the decks and it won't heat-expand / cool-contract as much.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 12:48   #28
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefuss View Post
Thank you all for your input.As I said the boat has basically been rebuilt and other than the deck worry she makes me smile everytime I think of her. If I make an offer that leads to a survey I suppose I will have to trust my surveyor to educate me as to the real state of the core and the teak. I too enjoy maintainance, but dont want to spend all my time on projects. I believe the boat has spent a lot of time in the pacific northwest, but in a season or two i will sail south. (So Columbia is a good option for repair or replacement). For the first few years I will leave her on the hard for aprox 6 months a year, and sail the other months, will the teak need constant dampening while I'm away?
One thing to watch out for - in the winter, if the boat is stored outside, any water between deck layers might freeze, thus imitating the feel of a solid deck.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 13:03   #29
Registered User
 
Bluefuss's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: B.C. Canada / San Carlos, Sonora
Boat: Tayana 37
Posts: 168
Thanks Rebel, as a matter of fact it has a full cover. When I leave it for 6 months, the boat will be in the tropics, while in Canada I will be on it most of the time. Is it possible to find a boatyard that would throw some saltwater on the deck once a week or so, in the tropics? Good thought about the ice Sneuman.
__________________
When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.
Mark Twain
Bluefuss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2010, 02:02   #30
Registered User
 
BlueWaterSail's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Honolulu, HI
Boat: 36' Magellan "Steady Beat"
Posts: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by S&S View Post
It doesn't last indefintiely- almost bought a nice Morgan Giles sloop with a planked deck- the original 1 1/4" teak was worn down to 1/2" in spots. The wood alone would have cost thousands.
That's how it was on my Cheoy Lee - the teak had received ongoing attention over the years (she was a '65), but had been worn/sanded down so much that it had lost it's structural integrity and needed either a full replacement or removal & glass over job.

BWS
__________________

__________________
BlueWaterSail is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Refinishing Teak Decks rourkeh Construction, Maintenance & Refit 1 27-07-2010 09:41
Teak Decks and Stains Jay Construction, Maintenance & Refit 14 01-03-2010 12:33
Teak Decks sailorboy1 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 45 06-01-2010 09:52
What to do with old teak decks? Solosailor Monohull Sailboats 2 19-02-2009 23:38
teak decks capt lar Construction, Maintenance & Refit 17 05-11-2005 19:50



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:53.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.