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Old 29-01-2010, 11:53   #16
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No one should buy a Catalina 27 before reading what John Vigor has to say about this boat. There are chapters on the Catalina 27 in two of his books.
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Old 29-01-2010, 12:07   #17
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The Kon Tiki was doable, but that doesn't make it a good idea.
Take a look at the rudder shaft of the Catalina 27 , then look at the amount of rudder behind it, and how far behind the rudder shaft it is, then look at the tiny amount of rudder area ahead of the shaft. It's hard to imagine a more unblalanced rudder. It would be bad enough on a balanced hull shape, but the catalina hull shape is anything but balanced.
The lady had no problem ever getting my 31 to balance well , in thousands of miles of ocean cruising.
If I were to collide with a cargo container on a dark night, I can't thing of any common fibreglass boats I'd feel safe in, regardless of how new they are. I have no such worries in my 25 year old steel hull.
Never owned a liferaft in 38 years of cruising , and in a steel hull I don't feel the need. My current 31 footer cost me $6,000 to get sailing, far less than the cost of a liferaft. I fell being at sea in my boat is a lot safer than living and commuting in a big city will ever be.
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Old 29-01-2010, 17:08   #18
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So why aren't there more steel boats? It's a relatively inexpensive material and easy to work. It's heavy, I suppose.
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Old 29-01-2010, 17:34   #19
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For about ten grand you could buy a snap together catalina, then you should take the other five and buy a switlik or a Viking life raft because your gonna need it when that peice of junk falls apart. Please for our tax payers sake sail around a bay for a year or go on a cruise with someone with some ability first. We shouldn't have to pay the Coast Guard to come save your butt when your crapping in your pants watching the mast light vanish from your sight. lol
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Old 29-01-2010, 18:20   #20
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Well, the person who started this thread realizes that a Catalina 27 won't fill the bill. The problem is, a 10K budget won't go very far in purchasing and outfilling a proper blue water boat.
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Old 29-01-2010, 20:38   #21
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There have been over 6,000 Catalina 27s built--more than any other sailboat in its size range. The nice thing about a Catalina 27 is that owning one will teach you to how to identify boat snobs.

A great plan for a sailor wannabe who only has $10,000 to throw at the sport:

1. Buy a C-27, realizing that you just bought the VW Beetle of the sailing universe. Realize, as well, that you're yet not ready for a Ferrari.
2. Let it teach you how to sail, just like it's taught tens of thousands before you.
3. Once you've outgrown it, sell it. If you've taken good care of it, you'll probably be able to sell it for as much as you bought it.
4. Now, and only now, start thinking about crossing oceans.
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Old 29-01-2010, 20:56   #22
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My friends, Steve and Charlotte are cruising in the Sea of Cortez right now in a Catalina 27 that they sailed down from the San Francisco Bay. How many people are working at jobs that they hate, saving up enough for that perfect, fully equipped, blue water cruiser, when if they settled for something less, could go now. If I had bought a less expensive boat, I could afford to be on it in Mexico right now, instead of back home, trying to raise more money.
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Old 29-01-2010, 21:18   #23
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I think JONCH was sincere yet because , in his lack of knowledge, appended some less than practical comments to his post, we have veered off the course of helping someone make real a dream.

Jonch, I would say this to you. If you truly want to accomplish this thing, let nothing stand in your way.

Henry Ford said it best:

WHETHER YOU THINK YOU CAN OR YOU THINK YOU CAN'T, YOU'RE RIGHT!

Dreams are the seed of reality and are watered by the sweat and tears of hard work and determination. Keep at it and don't let armchair sailors and "can't c*nt chickens**ts detour you from pursuit of your goals!

my $.02
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Old 30-01-2010, 06:38   #24
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Thanks for all the information guys. This will be a great starter point. I'm all about doing my homework, but I didn't really know what boat models to start looking at and reading about. I could probably stand to spend up to $15,000 if needed, but we will see.

I am still at least a year away from buying a boat, so I have plenty of time to research and weigh the pros and cons. I had even debating going ahead and getting a Catalina for now and use it for coastal cruising, but I'd rather buy what I want the first go around so I don't have to worry about trying to sell the Catalina and possibly not get all my initial investment back. I don't see any point in fixing up a boat that I will turn around and sell within a year or two.
Even a Hunter's better than a Catalina... lol. If your looking for a 27-30 may I suggest you look at a Pearson or Islander instead....
Come on guy's make some constructive suggestions... slagging Catalina's is getting boring..... hahahahaa
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Old 30-01-2010, 07:02   #25
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1. Look at the list of boats on atomvoyages.com-- posted in this thread.
2. Read Vigor's book-- 20 small sailboats to take you anywhere
3. Read Nestor's book-- 20 affordable sailboats to take you anywhere.
4. Periodically check Yachtworld to find one of these boats in halfway decent condition that you can afford.
5. Go look at as many boats you can. Go down to the local marinas and walk the docks.
6. Save every penny because whatever you buy will need some refitting.
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Old 30-01-2010, 08:54   #26
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I don't know if the boat snob comment was directed at me, but you don't know the first thing about me and shouldn't pass judgment. I happen to have bought my boat from National liquidators at an Auction in Fla and have rebuilt the whole friggen boat with my bare hands. I'm in the marine carpentry and glass/paint /gelcoat, etc business here on Long Island. My comments were not made to bash Catalina, but anyone hopping off to Catalina Island or up and down the west coat; who has never crossed the Gulf Stream in shitty weather is not in a position to tell this guy what a Catalina 27 can or can not take. I see the way deck hull joints are mated once all the interior fluff is out of the way. I also can tell you which boats have fully glass bulkheads, or just tabs every foot or maybe just marine adhesive. No way would any responsible sailor (wheather a Catalina fan or not suggest that it is a safe boat for a ocean passage). Yeah you may get lucky for awhile, but when the **** hits the fan and it will one day you will have wished you saved up. So if you want some realistic advise, take your ASA courses, sail around in a safe area for awhile, then do a passage like a Newport Bermuda race on a boat as crew. (very possible). See how you handle adverse conditions. Unlike hiking which you said you have done, you can't just get off the boat if you don't like it. Your in for the long haul. Anyone who has done any long term sailing, and been in bad stuff will tell you that this is when you find out what your made of. You'll either fold in the first five minutes or pull yourself together and do what you have to do to survive. Your only supposed to call the Coast Guard if your sinking, not scared. Just make sure you know what your getting into. These just go for it comments are very irresponsible.
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Old 30-01-2010, 09:37   #27
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Finding the boat and sailing it over the horizon are two different issues. There's nothing wrong with finding the boat and sailing it in protected waters until you feel you are ready to make a passage.

But if 10K is your budget and you want to see the world, find something like a Cape Dory 25D.
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Old 30-01-2010, 09:39   #28
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With your budget firmly in mind i would suggest you look at some of the old John Cherrubini designed Hunter 30 or even the 27s,now before everyone seeing the H word starts running off at the mouth just like they have with the Catalina suggestion,these things are a whole different animal to the newer ones.The 27,30,33and 37 were good moderate designs built as well(or as poorly)as the offerings from the likes of Pearson (Triton,Vangaurd etc) Columbia,Cal etc of the day.You might also look at Ferro cement boats(flame suit on) as you may find something larger and ready to go in your budget.As Brent said a steel boat would be great but probably not in your budget.Make no mistake,any boat you find will need to be modified and strengthened for the purpose,i dont care if its a Hunter or Catalina or a Triton,Vangaurd or Albin Vega.
Steve.
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Old 30-01-2010, 10:03   #29
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With your budget firmly in mind i would suggest you look at some of the old John Cherrubini designed Hunter 30 or even the 27s,now before everyone seeing the H word starts running off at the mouth just like they have with the Catalina suggestion,these things are a whole different animal to the newer ones.The 27,30,33and 37 were good moderate designs built as well(or as poorly)as the offerings from the likes of Pearson (Triton,Vangaurd etc) Columbia,Cal etc of the day.You might also look at Ferro cement boats(flame suit on) as you may find something larger and ready to go in your budget.As Brent said a steel boat would be great but probably not in your budget.Make no mistake,any boat you find will need to be modified and strengthened for the purpose,i dont care if its a Hunter or Catalina or a Triton,Vangaurd or Albin Vega.
Steve.
I agree with your assesment of the Cherubini designs... took a
37ft Cutter by Hunter across the Atlantic to Europe and found most shortcomings were in the limited storage and crap plastic leaky portlights... sliding doors suck too
Performance and feeling of safety were great....
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Old 30-01-2010, 13:04   #30
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I agree with your assesment of the Cherubini designs... took a
37ft Cutter by Hunter across the Atlantic to Europe and found most shortcomings were in the limited storage and crap plastic leaky portlights... sliding doors suck too
Performance and feeling of safety were great....
Supposedly the Cherubini designed Hunter 37 cutter was noticably better than the other Hunters of the era.
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