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Old 03-11-2012, 14:45   #1
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Stepping O'day 17 Daysailer Mast

I'm looking to buy an older (1960's) Daysailer 17, but I'm concerned about stepping the mast by myself. I'm an older guy, but still pretty nimble. I had a Ranger 16 and stepping the mast was a little hairy at times, so I'm wondering if anyone has good advice for me.

Thanks for your input.
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Old 03-11-2012, 15:45   #2
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Re: Stepping O'day 17 Daysailer Mast

There are all sorts of things that you can do to make stepping the mast easier, safer, and more controlled. I'm pushing 60 myself and I have no problems stepping the mast on my 15' daysailer. It's your decision, of course, but personally I wouldn't let worries about stepping the mast stop me from buying a boat.
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Old 04-11-2012, 15:50   #3
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Re: Stepping O'day 17 Daysailer Mast

Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
There are all sorts of things that you can do to make stepping the mast easier, safer, and more controlled. I'm pushing 60 myself and I have no problems stepping the mast on my 15' daysailer. It's your decision, of course, but personally I wouldn't let worries about stepping the mast stop me from buying a boat.
Many O'day Daysailers have a hinged tabernacle just above the cubby. If your boat does not have one it is easy to do. The tabernacle is common hardware.
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Old 04-11-2012, 19:14   #4
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Re: Stepping O'day 17 Daysailer Mast

I am 71, weigh 140 pound and can raise the mast by myself on my O'Day Daysailer II. This sailboat is 16' 9" long so I believe this is the boat you are considering. With the mast laying horizontally from the front of the trailer to the back of the boat, make sure the two cables (stays) that run from either side of the mast near its top run to the outward edges of both sides of the boat and are connected to these little inch square tabs that are bent up with a hole in them. Take the connector on the end of the stay and connect it to the inch square tab with a pin and clip. On a larger boat these tabs would be called chain plates. After connecting the stays which will keep the mast from tipping side to side, you will have to move the mast from its trailer support towards the back of the boat (aft). There are two similar looking stainless steel plates 4 inches long to with holes to attach two 3 inch pins through. These two plates together with the pins that connect the plates together are called the tabernacle. The two pins secure the tabernacle plates with the mast in the upright position. Now move the connection plate on the bottom of the mast to the similar plate that is connected to a post about three feet long made from the same extrusion as the mast that goes from the top of the miniature cabin (cuddy) to the floor of the cuddy. You will secure a 3-inch pin through the rearward hole on the plate on top of the post and also through the two lower holes on either side of the plate that is connected to the bottom of the mast. This now forms a hinge for the mast. Take the line used for hoisting the jib and connect the end of it that is normally attached to the top of the jib to a three or four foot long extension. You could use a 4-foot dog leash. A snap end of a dog leash can connect this extension to the forward most part of the boat. There is a stainless connector there that has two holes in it. Use the aft most hole. The forward most hole is used to connect the stainless cable to the front of the boat that holds up the mast just as the stays that attach the mast on the to the two sides of the boat. The jib sheet (rope) goes up the mast to a pulley normally used for raising the jib. Where the sheet comes back down the mast there will be another pulley that allows the sheet to then run aft and upwards a bit. Now lift the back end of the mast and pull on the jib line. The mast weight about 20 pounds. You should be able to get the mast half way up and then let the jib line do most of the work to get the mast all the way up. Cleat off the jib line (aka a sheet) and go forward with a pin and circle clip to secure the stainless steel cable (aka the forestay) that holds the mast up at the front of the boat. Also put the other 3-inch pin in the tabernacle. Two side stays that run somewhat aft and the forestay now support the mast. The mast is secure. Make sure the centerboard is all the way up. Now back the sailboat trailer into the water, take the sailboat loose from the trailer and put the rudder on. Somewhere here I am sure you will have tied the sailboat to a cleat on the dock. It takes me 30 to 45 minutes to get the mast up and boat in the water. If I have help I just walk the mast up and have someone clip in the forstay. Forget the jib sheet and extension.
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