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Old 10-01-2009, 15:42   #31
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"Origami Metal Boatbuilding a Heretics Guide" is a good read and far more up to date.
Do a search under origamiboats and pick the first one (yahoo groups)
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Old 27-03-2009, 18:36   #32
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We built our steel yacht 20 yrs ago and still sail her. For amateur building, work out an expected time frame and triple it. The hull is the cheapest quickest part of the venture. Steel is a great material. Our yacht would probably have been sunk two or three times over the last 20 yrs if she had not been steel. Good initial prep means easy maintenance. Once a year I get out there with a petrol engined compressor and a hand held blast gun and do touch up. If I haven't got the time I just put lanocote grease on and that lasts for years. For a new chip, a smear of five minute two pack glue holds things. Rust also usually looks much worse than it is. Also easy to alter. We are soon to move the engine, remove the aft cabin and relocate the cockpit and will be able to do so with a minimum of hassle compared with other materials. Regards, Richard.
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Old 27-03-2009, 21:02   #33
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Rust never sleeps..........
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Old 30-03-2009, 22:16   #34
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Rust never sleeps..........
If you paint it right it does.

It's blisters that never sleep--you can't paint them away or weld in a new plate if need be.

And then there's keel bolts. Out of sight and out of mind, right?
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Old 01-04-2009, 08:24   #35
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Welding Techniques?

Which welding techniques (for the hull) are steel boaters most fond of?
re building?
re finishing?
re durability/corrosion control?
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Old 01-04-2009, 08:36   #36
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Options?

Not quite sure what you are asking. Are there any options to just plain good welds?
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Old 01-04-2009, 15:20   #37
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If you have a trained welder, working inside a draught free shed and doing everything by the book, it is hard to beat MIG. However, it is very easy to put down a nice looking MIG weld that has little penetration and no real strength.
For the amateur builder, I would suggest stick. If a stick weld looks good, then the chances are that is strong. Make sure to learn about distortion control before you start. Which ever way you go, it is worthwhile doing a short welding course.
Regards, Richard.
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Old 01-04-2009, 22:07   #38
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Stick for thick

Agree that MIG can lack penetration and should probably be used for 3mm.
Many professionals stay with stick for that reason. Can turn out a pretty bad welding job if an amateur though due to the heat of sticks.
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Old 03-04-2009, 22:08   #39
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From what I have been reading it seems like steel is the way to go. Wood rots and there is not much you can do about it once it starts. Fiberglass is great until it breaks... But steel sounds like that all it needs is some love from time to time and it will last forever. Plus you can plow over pretty much anything without much worry of breaking in half. I think I am almost swayed into wanting to get a hold of a good solid steel boat.
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Old 03-04-2009, 22:35   #40
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wanting to get a hold of a good solid steel boat.

If you can find a good one. I found that if it was affordable to buy it was too expensive to own. I am sure there are good ones out there. Time and a place to do it by your self is hard to find. If you have the money no problem. I had one and was quickly overwhelmed. Even if I could fix it I found it was imposable to insure. It was a home built. Biggest most costly mistake I ever made, other than my marriages.
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Old 04-04-2009, 08:51   #41
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Weld Decay

Stillbuild & Boden,
Maybe a better question would be, "What combination of weld and hull material are people using?" Stick & Mild Steel? Is anyone using the the superaustenitic steel alloys as hull material?

What consideration are you giving to corrosion affects around the weld (e.g. weld decay)? I'm planning a build, and I am studying some of the effects of heat on the carbon content around the high heat areas of some steel alloys. I was hoping to hear from or compare anyone's experiences out there.

Point of interest - I have an aquaintance inspecting a steel hull for a potential repair job. The hull material is in good/great condition, but all the welds are severely pitted and corroded. (Beautiful boat - with a $$$$ repair).
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Old 04-04-2009, 16:38   #42
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Penetration, heat control and finish...

On of the reason that I brought Boracay was that the welds were done properly. All of them looked to have good penetration, had not been "overground" and distortion was acceptable.

I would be hesitant to build or buy a hull that was not made of mild steel.

There are many other factors in evaluating a steel boat. To me, the main one is that all internal water must drain freely to a well constructed bilge.
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Old 04-04-2009, 17:11   #43
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Hi,
you may like to join the MetalBoatbuilding.org - Welcome to the Frontpage group. A free not for profit organisation discussing only metal boats. ( ally and steel)
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Old 04-04-2009, 17:46   #44
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Ausenitic steel and welding

Mine has been built by a professional steel boatbuilder who came out of retirement to do this one last boat. Is all Corten steel (used to be Austen before Oz shipped steel production offshore) which has been no problem for him to weld. Austenitic steel merits are arguable but only a few dollars extra so why not. I believe there are some merits to the material.
This chap uses stick only, even for light plate. Hull is amazingly fair with very little need for epoxy clag. Welding impeccable of course. I have seen amateur welding literally fall apart under stress. I seem to remember one famous case of a yacht which had to be completely re-welded in South Africa - would be unusual case though.

Given that the welding is good, the real issues preventing deterioration are the detailed construction designs which allow shot blasting, good painting and drainage. Has not been a problem for me but could stop you being too intricate.

Some details which would reduce weight simply cannot be done or become self-defeating from a cost viewpoint. No big problem in this boat but might be in a light displacement design.

A good craftsman can do anything with steel of course but can be labour intensive which is why a professionally built steel yacht is likely to be MORE EXPENSIVE than GRP and its derivatives. Frankly, is difficult to find a true craftsman to do yacht finish in steel. Lots of workboat finish builders around but very few fine tradesmen. IMO.
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Old 04-04-2009, 18:48   #45
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Cor-Ten

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Is all Corten steel ... which has been no problem for him to weld. Austenitic steel merits are arguable but only a few dollars extra so why not. I believe there are some merits to the material.
Stillbuilding,
Was Cor-Ten a specific choice for your construction? I hear that it is popular for its improved atmospheric corrosion resistance. But I also hear that it is often less preferred by some builders because its not as workable as mild steel (bending and welding). What made you decide on Cor-Ten?
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